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The medieval roots of gender and sexuality in Spanish colonial law

The medieval roots of gender and sexuality in Spanish colonial law

Lecture by Marie Kelleher

Given at Oregon State University on January 7, 2015

Marie Kelleher discusses the medieval roots of gender and sexuality in Spanish colonial law, beginning with the written law (both secular and ecclesiastical) and how it defines the parameters of respectable female behavior. She then turns to law as a discursive practice, in which women engaged with both courts and communities to define themselves, paying special attention to how innovations in procedural law (especially inquisitorial procedure) provided the framework for this to take place. She concludes with a couple of brief case examples on the intersection of law, gender, and violence to illustrate what was at stake in these self-definitions.

Marie Kelleher

Marie Kelleher, Associate Professor of Medieval History, CSULB, author The Measure of Woman: Law and Female Identity in the Crown of Aragon, Winner of the American Historical Association’s 2012 Premio del Rey and in progress: The Hungry City: Food, Famine, and a Year in the Life of Medieval Barcelona.

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