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Voyagers in the Vault of Heaven: The Phenomenon of Ships in the Sky in Medieval Ireland and Beyond

This paper explores the phenomenon of ships voyaging in the sky. Such fantastical sightings are considered primarily in an early medieval Irish context, but evidence from places as widely separated in time and place as thirteenth-century England and eighteenth-century Canada is also addressed.

Viking invasions, a French failure?

Vikings never interested French Historians. Pagan, illiterate, barbaric, Germanic, everything was despicable in the eyes of the French Historians of the 19th century.

Dress pins from Anglo-Saxon England

This thesis examines the development, production and function of dress pins in Anglo- Saxon England.

The Day the Sun Turned Blue: A Volcanic Eruption in the Early 1460s and Its Possible Climatic Impact—A Natural Disaster Perceived Globally in the Late Middle Ages?

Strange atmospheric phenomena visible all over Europe in September 1465 are interpreted as the result of a volcanic dust veil, possibly originating from a re-dated eruption of Kuwae in Vanuatu, in the southwestern Pacific.

Rómverja saga: an introduction and a translation

Rómverja saga is an Old Icelandic translation of three Latin works on historical themes from the classical period. In this thesis, I provide the first English translation of this little-known text in the hope that it might prove a resource for scholars interested in the reception of Latin literature in the medieval period.

The economy of Norwegian towns c. 1250-1350

The aim of this thesis is to explain why differences arose between Norwegian, Danish and English towns with regard to their economic functions

Echoes of Legend: Magic as the Bridge Between a Pagan Past and a Christian Future in Sir Thomas Malory ‘s Le Morte Darthur

It the goal of this thesis to show how magic and Christianity form a symbiotic relationship in which both are reliant on each other in order to be successful in the medieval romance.

The Female Audience of the Manuscripts of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales

This thesis finds evidence that women used the manuscripts of the Canterbury Tales in an informal way, and the books were potentially kept in close proximity at home.

Survival to amputation in pre-antibiotic era: a case study from a Longobard necropolis (6th-8th centuries AD)

This is a remarkable example in which an older male survived the loss of a forelimb in pre-antibiotic era.

Hveiti ok Hunang: Viking Age Icelandic Mead?

This paper will try and draw out the picture of mead in Viking Age Iceland, a picture worth elaborating on due to the importance of Icelandic sources of information for an even larger culture.

The Fourth Crusade and the Problem of Food Provision in The Accounts of Robert De Clari and Geoffroy De Villehardouin

The analysis discusses their account of food provision and how Crusaders managed to provide for themselves during their journey from Venice to Constantinople in the period between June 1202 and May 1204.

“Flanders was empty and uncultivated and heavily wooded”: Historiography as Urban Resource in the Twelfth Century

This sentence tells us little about the actual beginnings of the county of Flanders but it does tell us something about the way Lambert imagined the beginnings of the county in the first part of the twelfth century.

Living with Medieval Things: Why We Need a Global Medieval Archaeology

This essay argues for the critical relevance of medieval material culture to contemporary politics, and for the necessity of an engaged global medieval archaeology.

‘I watch it for historic reasons.’ Representation and reception of the Middle Ages in ‘A Song of Ice and Fire’ and ‘Game of Thrones’

This article aims to analyse several ideas of the Middle Ages that inspired HBO’s TV show Game of Thrones (HBO 2011-), based on George R. R. Martin’s ongoing series of novels A Song of Ice and Fire (1996-).

From reformed barbarian to “saint-king”: literary portrayals of King Malcolm III Canmore (r. 1058-93) in Scottish historical narratives, c. 1100- 1449

It examines how King Malcolm went from being considered a barbaric king of Scots reformed by the influence of his second wife, Saint Margaret of Scotland (d. 1093), to the Scottish prince exiled in England by Macbeth (r. 1040-1057/8).

Blood Cries Afar: The Forgotten Invasion of England, 1216

The large French expeditionary force that landed in England in May 1216 allied with baronial rebels against King John to divide the country for eighteen months. For a year the French occupied and ruled the richest one-third of England, including the capital, London.

Fighting in women’s clothes: The pictorial evidence of Walpurgis in Ms. I.33

Ms. I.33 is not only the oldest of the known fencing treatises in European context, it is also the only one showing a woman fighting equally with contemporary men.

Fulfilling Gregory’s goal: the conversion of the Anglo-Saxon people

The conversion of the Anglo-Saxons in the seventh century AD was a complex process that involved several stages.

A Pious Mouse and a Deadly Cat: The Schede tou Myos, attributed to Theodore Prodromos

The text, here translated and commented on, is a school exercise but comic in tone, and so appropriate both for pupils and as court entertainment, as it echoes contemporary criticism of monks.

Severity and Selectivity of the Black Death and Recurring Plague in the Southern Netherlands (1349-1450)

This paper offers a newly-compiled database of 25,610 individuals that died between 1349-1450 in the County of Hainaut to test a number of assumptions on the selectivity and severity of late medieval plague outbreaks.

The Square “Fighting March” of the Crusaders at the Battle of Ascalon (1099)

In this paper I will examine a number of theories about the origin of this particular marching formation, based on the manuals attributed to the Byzantine Emperors Maurice (582–602), Leo VI (886–912) and Nicephoros Phocas (963– 69) and several anonymous Byzantine military treatises of the sixth and tenth centuries.

Ampullae and Badges: Pilgrim Paraphernalia in Late Medieval England

Late medieval persons who adorned their hats and cloaks with the traces of their pilgrimage visits grappled with many conflicting perspectives.

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