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Outcasts: Prejudice and Persecution in the Medieval World comes to the Getty

Outcasts: Prejudice & Persecution in the Medieval World, on view January 30—April 8, 2018 at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center, presents individual case studies that examine the way art, like language, was used to articulate a rhetoric of exclusion.

Now and Forever: The Art of Medieval Time – new exhibition comes to the Morgan Library

Drawing upon the rich holdings of the Morgan Library & Museum’s collection of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, Now and Forever explores how people told time in the Middle Ages and what they thought about it.

Is the Bayeux Tapestry coming to Britain?

Reports suggest the Bayeux Tapestry – one of the most famous pieces of medieval art – will be loaned to the British Museum for several months.

York Minster’s Great East Window restoration completed

On 2 January 2018, the final panel in York Minster’s 600-year-old Great East Window was returned to the world-famous masterpiece, 10 years after all 311 panels were removed by York Glaziers Trust.

Research into Anglo-Saxon burials uncover new insights

Christine Cave, a PhD candidate at the Austrialian National University, has developed a new method for determining the age-of-death for skeletal remains based on how worn the teeth are.

Canterbury Roll now available online

In New Zealand, University of Canterbury staff and students are working to translate and digitise a unique medieval manuscript to make it accessible to the world.

Medieval friary where Richard III was buried to be protected

The remains of a 13th century monastic site, Greyfriars in Leicester, which was the burial place of King Richard III, has been granted protection by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on the advice of Historic England.

Ruins of 8th century monument discovered in Mongolia

A joint excavation team from Osaka University and the Institute of History and Archaeology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences discovered the ruins of a unique monument surrounded by 14 large stone pillars with Turkic Runic inscriptions.

How the Pope’s rhino drowned and was immortalised in art history

The story of one of the most infamous gifts, and one of the most influential images in art history, has been brought back to life thanks to research at the University of Warwick.

Restoration work begins on 15th century altar

The Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung has launched a large-scale conservation project that will focus on one of the collection’s most important works over the next few years.

Thousand-year-old cathedral surrenders its secrets, stone by stone

The secrets of Norway’s St Olav’s shrine and Nidaros Cathedral have drawn pilgrims for nearly a thousand years. Curious researchers have also made the journey, eager to solve the mysteries locked up in the cathedral’s stones.

St Albans Cathedral Finds Lost Abbot

Archaeologists from the Canterbury Archaeological Trust (CAT) working at St Albans Cathedral have discovered the grave of John of Wheathampstead, a former Abbot of national and international renown, who died in 1465, and whose burial site had remained a mystery up until now. In an extremely rare development, the team also discovered three papal seals, […]

Are These the Bones of Santa Claus?

A new radio carbon analysis of a relic claimed to be part of St. Nicholas’ pelvis suggests the bone could possibly be authentic. Using a micro-sample of bone fragment originally held in Lyon, France, Professor Tom Higham and Dr Georges Kazan, the Directors of the Oxford Relics Cluster at Keble College’s Advanced Studies Centre, tested […]

Call for Papers: Omission – University of Oxford English Faculty Graduate Conference 2018

From lost or damaged Medieval manuscripts to censored modernist texts, omissions have marked and shaped our critical practices.

Researchers unlock the chemistry of Irish medieval manuscripts

Hidden away among the letters and words that cover the Gaelic manuscripts of the late middle ages is a world of minerals and chemical compounds. These chemicals have their own tales to tell about the craft and ingenuity of the scribes.

1,300 Hebrew manuscript now online in bilingual website

The British Library has launched its first ever fully bilingual web resource, providing free access to its spectacular collection of Hebrew manuscripts to researchers worldwide.

New archaeology festival announced in memory of pioneer Mick Aston

Sir Tony Robinson announces DigNation – a weekend festival programme of live excavations and talks on Lindisfarne in memory of friend and Time Team co-host Mick Aston.

Early medieval writings of the First Apocalypse of James discovered

The first-known original Greek copy of an early Christian writing describing Jesus’ secret teachings to his brother James has been discovered at Oxford University

New game allows students to explore the art of 15th and 16th century Florence

A new course centered around a video game was launched this fall at Texas A&M University. The course uses the video game ARTé: Mecenas, in which students are transported to the 15th and 16th centuries to commission works of art as a Medici banker.

York Becomes Home of Medieval Christmas Celebrations

York Becomes Home of Medieval Christmas Celebrations York’s historic Barley Hall is hosting a special exhibition exploring the lost Christmas celebrations of ordinary citizens of the city in the Middle Ages. Christmas can be a stressful time, with so many presents to buy, a tree to decorate and so much to food to prepare that […]

Historian explores the Viking connection to Frisia

Frisia, the coastal region between the Zwin (near Bruges) and the Weser (near Bremen), was linked to the Viking world around the North Sea more closely in the Viking age (c. 800-1050) than we supposed – particularly to England and Denmark.

Early medieval loom discovered in northern Iraq

A team of Frankfurt-based archaeologists has returned from the Iraqi-Kurdish province of Sulaymaniyah with new findings. The discovery of a loom from the 5th to 6th century AD in particular caused a stir.

Medieval treasure discovered at the Abbey of Cluny

In mid-September, a large treasure was unearthed during a dig at the Abbey of Cluny, in the French department of Saône-et-Loire.

Medieval sites both saved and at risk in the new Heritage at Risk Register

Historic England reveals sites at risk and places rescued, including several medieval buildings, as the 2017 Heritage at Risk Register is published.

Major Michelangelo exhibition to begin next week at The Met

Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from November 13, 2017, through February 12, 2018, will present a stunning range and number of works by the artist.

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