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How to touch, smell and taste a ‘deconstructed’ medieval manuscript

A unique opportunity to experience a medieval manuscript as a sensory experience is currently taking place at the University of Leicester.

Digital Mappa 1.0 now online – new digital resource for medievalists

A new digital humanities resource has been launched by the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Pennsylvania, geared to the medieval studies community to create research workspaces, editions, scholarship, collaboration and open access publications.

Going beyond medieval times to explore early worlds

The Early Worlds Initiative—an interdisciplinary research project at the University of Rochester—aims to help faculty, researchers, students, and even the general public delve deeper into this complex and intriguing field.

Volcanic eruptions in the 6th century plunged Eurasia into hunger and disease

A recent study indicates that volcanic eruptions in the mid 500s resulted in an unusually gloomy and cold period, and that the years 536 and 541-544 CE were very difficult for many people.

Call for Papers: Migrants and Refugees in the Law

International conference which will take place in Murcia, Spain, on December 12-14, 2018

Medieval Times coming to Arizona

Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament broke ground this week on its tenth North American castle, to be located in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Beverley Minster and nearly 1,100 years of sanctuary

In 937 King Athelstan granted Beverley the Right of Sanctuary – one of only two towns in the north of England with this status. Beverley Minster, the town’s main church, will be commemorating this event with the Place of Sanctuary project.

400-year-old documents reveal evidence of Japanese opium production and winemaking

Researchers have revealed that Tadatoshi Hosokawa, a 17th century lord of Kyusyu, Japan, ordered his people to produce not only wine but also opium for medical purposes.

Nomads were setting food trends along the Silk Roads

‘Nomadic groups likely had access to a wider variety of foods. Through their mobility, they promoted far-reaching networks along the Silk Road, and therefore had great potential to influence trends and cultural changes’

How a volcanic eruption influenced Iceland’s conversion to Christianity

Memories of the largest lava flood in the history of Iceland, recorded in an apocalyptic medieval poem, were used to drive the island’s conversion to Christianity, new research suggests.

X-Ray Imaging uncovers hidden ancient text in medieval manuscript

This week researchers in California are scanning a medieval manuscript to help uncover a medical text by the ancient physician Galen, which was scrapped off and replaced in the eleventh-century.

Domesday coming to the British Library

The National Archives will loan Domesday, the most famous and earliest surviving public record, to the British Library for its landmark exhibition, Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms.

Build a medieval city with new video game

Foundation is a grid-less, sprawling medieval city building simulation with a heavy focus on organic development, monument construction and resource management.

Researchers discover early medieval women with their skulls altered

A new palaeogenomic study of early medieval people in southern Germany has revealed the presence of women who had their skulls artificially altered.

Undergraduate research project finds connection between Chaucer and medieval astronomers

Senior English Literature major, Michael Walecke, is mapping collocations of one of Chaucer’s only prose works.

Rare Collection of Royal Charters to Be Preserved for Future Generations

A rare collection of royal charters dating back to the 12th century will be restored as part of a new project to preserve the precious documents for future generations.

Were rabbits first domesticated in the Early Middle Ages?

Scientists from Oxford University test dating methods to challenge whether our relationship and affection for rabbits dates back to any single event, or, if it is instead better explained as a continuum that has evolved over time.

The Newberry opens up access to 1.7 million historical images

The Newberry seeks to promote wider public engagement with 1.7 million high-res images now online.

700-year-old ring bearing the image of St. Nicholas discovered by a gardener in Israel

A rare impressive, intact bronze ring from the Middle Ages, bearing the image of St. Nicholas, was discovered by chance during recent landscaping work in the garden of a home in the Jezreel Valley community of Moshav Yogev.

What Vikings really put in their pillows

Your pillows – if they’re not synthetic – are almost certainly filled with domestic goose or duck feathers. These are the most common types of fill used for this purpose today. But our ancestors weren’t always as discerning.

New game, Kingdom Come: Deliverance, explores life in medieval Bohemia

Released on 13 February, Kingdom Come: Deliverance is an action role-playing game set in the early fifteenth-century Holy Roman Empire that has striven for historically accurate and highly detailed content.

Collection of 3,000 medieval manuscripts now online

After centuries of separation, one of the most valuable collections of manuscripts from the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age – the Bibliotheca Palatina – has been virtually reunited.

Nalbinding for Beginners

Nalbinding is the Viking-Age term for single-needle knitting. A traditional wool craft that would be used to make woollen hats, socks, gloves and mittens.

Delapré Abbey opens its doors to reveal 900 years of history

After an extensive programme of National Lottery funded restoration, Delapré Abbey in Northamptonshire is set to open to the public from March 17th 2018.

High-tech scans reveal secrets of medieval burial stones in Scotland

The latest digital photography techniques applied to the ancient burial stones at Inchinnan Parish Church in western Scotland have revealed that one of the stones, thought to be medieval in date, was originally carved much earlier..

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