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The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, No. 14) : Historic Selfies!

In this issue: Historic selfies with the medieval kings of France, and in Renaissance coins, the Anglo-Saxon fenlands, and how DNA research on chickens is linked to medieval diet and fasting traditions. We visit Anne Boleyn’s childhood home and look at the Holy Spirit in female form.

The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, No. 13) : Vikings!

In this issue: Vikings, zombies, medieval music, stew, and celebrating 600 years of London’s history.

What’s more bloody – Game of Thrones or the Wars of the Roses?

Has Game of Thrones become far too bloody? Surprisingly, statistical analyses actually indicate that the fictional show is quite realistic compared to a real life medieval civil war.

What Happened to the Grandsons and Great-grandsons of the House of York?

The Tudors, according to Tudor propaganda, brought an end to 30 years of civil war between the Houses of York and Lancaster, merging the two families through Henry VII’s marriage to Elizabeth of York, the eldest daughter of the Yorkist King Edward IV, the son of Duke Richard.

The Lancastrian Retreat from Populist Discourse? Propaganda Conflicts in the Wars of the Roses

This article explores an aspect of the propaganda wars that were conducted between the Lancastrian and Yorkist sides during the series of conflicts historians refer to as the Wars of the Roses.

‘Now Is the Winter of Our Discontent’: “Good” King Richard Takes the Stage

The Golden Age Theatre Company, who put on this reboot of Richard’s life, tried to portray a different side of the story

The Wars of the Roses, by John Ashdown-Hill

John Ashdown-Hill gets right to the heart of this ‘thorny’ subject, dispelling the myths and bringing clarity to a topic often shrouded in confusion.

The Road to Richard: The Reburial of the Last Plantagenet

While there have been outcries over the pomp and circumstance surrounding Richard’s extravagant burial, there has also been a renewed sense of pride and upswing in popularity for this much maligned monarch.

Quiz: The Battles of the Wars of the Roses

How well do you know your timelines – can you correctly place in order these nine battles from the Wars of the Roses?

Margaret Beaufort, Mother of King Henry VII

Margaret Beaufort, Mother of King Henry VII By Susan Abernethy Lady Margaret Beaufort was the matriarch of the Tudor dynasty of Kings in England. Her life was greatly influenced by the turning of the Wheel of Fortune. That she managed to survive the vagaries of the War of Roses in England is something at which […]

Cannonball from Wars of the Roses battle discovered

A lead ball, believed to be the oldest cannonball ever found in England, has been discovered on the site of the Battle of Northampton.

‘There is more to the story than this, of course’: Character and Affect in Philippa Gregory’s The White Queen

Philippa Gregory has critiqued gendered representations of Elizabeth Woodville and has stated that her 2009 novel The White Queen fictionalises Woodville’s history with the aim of challenging such depictions.

Reflection of the Wars of the Roses in Thomas Malory`s Le Morte D`Arthur: Literary-cultural analysis

The aim of this research paper is to analyse the Morte D’Arthur and find certain historical moments incorporated in the book. Firstly, as the goal of work follows a hypothesis that Thomas Malory reflected manifold incidents from the Wars of the Roses in the Morte D’Arthur, it was inevitable to understand author’s position in this civil war, which meant investigating in the authorship.

Bosworth Battlefield Heritage Society launches this month

This month sees the launch of a new society promoting interest in the Battle of Bosworth, the last major battle of the Wars of the Roses.

Murder, Alchemy and the Wars of the Roses

What follows is a kind of murder mystery, but not a whodunit. The identity of the man who carried out the crime, while indeed a mystery, is probably unknowable and actually unimportant.

The history of foxglove poisoning, was Edward IV a victim?

The history of foxglove poisoning, was Edward IV a victim? Peter Stride (University of Queensland School of Medicine, Australia) Fiona Winston-Brown (Librarian, Redcliffe Hospital, Australia) Richard III Society: Inc. Vol. 43 No. 1 March (2012) Abstract Edward IV, having been obese, but otherwise apparently in good health, died after an acute illness of only a […]

To be a King: changing concepts of kingship during the reign of Henry VI, 1422-1461

The questions we must ask ourselves at this early juncture, considering the nature of the debate, is why this king was able to persevere for so long on the throne despite his infirmities?

Fighting to preserve two Wars of the Roses Battlefields

The battlefields of Towton and Tewkesbury, which were critical moments during England’s Wars of the Roses, are both facing threats that could limit access to them by the public

Two dozen and more Silkwomen of Fifteenth-Century London

This article attempts to record systematically all the silkwomen of London who were daughters or wives of London mercers between 1400 and 1499.

New book pinpoints the site of the Battle of Bosworth

Bosworth 1485: A Battlefield Rediscovered, co-authored by Dr Foard and the historian Anne Curry, they describe the background to the battle and the archaeological project to find out where it was actually fought.

Interview with author Isolde Martyn

Isolde Martyn is best-selling author of historical fiction, much of it centred on the Wars of the Roses.

Welsh Poetry and the War of the Roses

This is a brief summary of a paper on Welsh poetry, patronage and politics. It was given at the Celtic Studies Association of North America Annual Conference at the University of Toronto April 18 – 21, 2013.

Solem a Tergo Reliquit: The Troublesome Battle of Bosworth Field

The first major point upon which we disagree concerns the nature of existing evidence about the Battle. Richardson points to a number of sources, but the central problem here is that, with one ex- ception, they are not contemporary with the Battle itself.

The Princess and the Gene Pool: The Plantagenet rebel who held the secret to Richard III’s DNA

Richard III is perhaps the most controversial figure in British history and historians will long be discussing what new light the finds cast on his story. But the long-forgotten Anne was herself a creature of scandal – a woman who openly took a lover; divorced her husband; and kept his family lands anyway.

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