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Stefan Nemanja: A Case Of Sacral Kingship

This PhD thesis investigates how the successors to the first ruler of an amalgamation of Serb lands, the Raškan Serb Veliki Župan, Stefan Nemanja, sought to create legitimacy for what otherwise may have been the passing successes of one local chieftain.

The Customary of the Royal Convent of Las Huelgas of Burgos: Female Liturgy, Female Scribes

This article explores the medieval customary of the royal convent of Las Huelgas of Burgos, a hitherto unpublished document of critical importance for the knowledge of one of the most emblematic institutions of medieval Castile.

A Will of their Own? Children’s Agency and Child Labour in Byzantium

This paper examines the relation between three concepts: a child’s will, children’s agency and child labour. This paper shows how these concepts were developed in Byzantine society in order to advance a religious agenda.

Mercantile Arithmetic in Renaissance  Italy: A Translation and Study of Selected Passages from a Vernacular Abbaco Work

This essay is a study of a Renaissance Italian manuscript which has been published under the title Arte Giamata Aresmetica (‘The Art Called Arithmetic’).

The Inverse Perspective in Byzantine Painting

The inverse perspective is a method of representing spatial depth used only in Byzantine painting. It is different from Renaissance perspective. The inverse perspective, with two-dimensional axonometric representations, is more complex, offering multiple possibilities of symbolization.

Beard Pulling in Medieval Christian Art: Various Interpretations of a Scene

Christian iconography contains a lot of subjects with unclear interpretation. More difficult are the cases where unclear subjects could have several possible interpretations. That is the case of the scene where one man is pulling out the beard of another one.

Krakow, the Old Town – A Continental Venice

Surviving the destructions of the war, the old town of Krakow is a lesson of architecture and urbanism through the multitude of architectural styles, coherence and urban continuity.

Was a lease effective as a weapon of lordship? The use of documents in the principality of Salerno (10th-11th Century)

This paper attempts to examine the strategic use of the agrarian contracts by the landlords of the principality of Salerno in the tenth and eleventh centuries.

After Soissons: The Last Years of Charles the Simple (923-929)

In August 923, Charles the Simple was imprisoned by Count Heribert II of Vermandois, spending the rest of his life in prison. The six years between his imprisonment and his death, however, have never been the focus of a sustained study.

Outcasts: Prejudice and Persecution in the Medieval World comes to the Getty

Outcasts: Prejudice & Persecution in the Medieval World, on view January 30—April 8, 2018 at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center, presents individual case studies that examine the way art, like language, was used to articulate a rhetoric of exclusion.

Now and Forever: The Art of Medieval Time – new exhibition comes to the Morgan Library

Drawing upon the rich holdings of the Morgan Library & Museum’s collection of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, Now and Forever explores how people told time in the Middle Ages and what they thought about it.

Not All Fun and Games: The Dangers of the Medieval Tournament

The tournament, with all its elements of theatre and spectacle, was the ideal showground for martial skill, chivalric values, and medieval masculinity. But, behind the glamour, was a dangerous sport that often involved life or death circumstances.

Women in the Tang Dynasty: Prescribed, dependent and scary

Images from the Tang dynasty 唐朝 (618–907) present us with independent and powerful women, conferring the idea that the Tang dynasty was the one era in Chinese history in which the patriarchal grip was not as tight as during other dynasties.

Venice’s Need for Settling the ‘Byzantine question’ by Conquest: The Fourth Crusade’s Second Siege of Constantinople (early 1204)

This article is a contribution to the ‘diversion debate’ concerning the Fourth Crusade (1202-1204), which argues that ultimately the endangered Venetian commercial interests were at the core of the final decision by the crusade leadership to conquer and take over the Byzantine empire.

Cardinals and the War of Ferrara

The bestowal of a red hat can turn even the most humbly born cleric into an ecclesiastical prince, but whereas few cardinals of the modern era have been born princely, most of those created in the Renaissance period could claim to be of noble lineage.

Linking the Mediterranean: The Construction of Trading Networks in 14th and 15th-century Italy

When the Mediterranean Sea is discussed historically, it is never a simple question of geography. Its meaning remains somewhat indeterminate. It refers to intellectual journeys that do not circumnavigate any one particular region; it indicates periods that splash over.

English Queenship 1445-1503

The Wars of the Roses marked a period of political instability which brought into question existing ideologies of kingship and, within that, of queenship, reshaping the latter office and its rituals.

Herod the Great in Medieval Art and Literature

This thesis follows the treatment of Herod the Great in the art and literature of 1500 years, concentrating especially on the iconographic detail and distinctive literary developments of this paradoxical king of the Jews.

Constructing Communities: Identification and Self-Understanding in the Twelfth-Century North of England

This is a study of local communities in the north of England between 1069 and 1200. It examines the way these communities were constructed, imagined and perceived by contemporary individuals.

‘To Talk of Many Things’: Whales, Walrus, and Seals in Medieval Icelandic Literature

The use of whales, walrus, and seals in the sagas illustrates a cultural map of the ocean. This network of places, known and imagined, is filled in by trade goods, species and place names, and stories that incorporate the denizens of the deep.

A Falconer’s Ritual: A study of the cognitive and spiritual dimensions of pre-Christian Scandinavian falconry

Working from the premise that falconry was introduced in Scandinavia from an eastern origin sometime in the course of the 6th century AD, this paper suggests that the practice may have harboured cognitive and spirituals dimensions unshared by the rest of the feudal, Christian European kingdoms.

Science and the Future of the Human Past

Michael McCormick discusses how we can discover our ancestors and their lived experience, their successes and failures, and invent a new discipline, the Science of the Human Past.

York Minster’s Great East Window restoration completed

On 2 January 2018, the final panel in York Minster’s 600-year-old Great East Window was returned to the world-famous masterpiece, 10 years after all 311 panels were removed by York Glaziers Trust.

Research into Anglo-Saxon burials uncover new insights

Christine Cave, a PhD candidate at the Austrialian National University, has developed a new method for determining the age-of-death for skeletal remains based on how worn the teeth are.

Canterbury Roll now available online

In New Zealand, University of Canterbury staff and students are working to translate and digitise a unique medieval manuscript to make it accessible to the world.

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