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The Black Prince at War: the anatomy of a Chevauchée

These were highly complex, organized, and focused operations rather than unfocused raids with no other purpose but pillage and ravishment.

The Poetry of Trauma: On the Crécy Dead

By Danièle Cybulskie Time and again, I’ve heard medieval knights referred to as “killing machines”, bred for a lifetime of battle and destruction. Difficult as it may be, it’s critical to for us to remember that every one of the men mired in mud and blood on the battlefield was not a machine, but a […]

Technological Determinisms of Victory at the Battle of Agincourt

This article takes issue with the deterministic conclusions of a recent study by three scientists who investigated the effects of wearing armour on soldier exhaustion during the battle of Agincourt.

Agincourt 1415 – 2015

Anne Curry talks about the myths and history of the Battle of Agincourt

Celebrating Agincourt 600 at the Wallace Collection

This week, historians around the world are gearing up to commemorate the 600th anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt, one of the most significant battles of the Hundred Year’s War.

Agincourt 1415: The Battle

What you haven’t got is an ordered advance – you’ve got complete and total chaos.

Five Myths about the Battle of Agincourt

Anne Curry explains that ‘no other battle has generated so much interest or some much myth’ as the Battle of Agincourt, fought on October 25, 1415.

Tactics, Strategy, and Battlefield Formation during the Hundred Years War: The Role of the Longbow in the ‘Infantry Revolution’

The English longbow had a tremendous impact on strategy and tactics during the Hundred Years War.

New Location for the Battle of Crécy discovered

For over 250 years it has been believed that the Battle of Crécy, one of the most famous battles of the Middle Ages, was fought just north of the French town of Crécy-en-Ponthieu in Picardy. Now, a new book that contains the most intensive examination of sources about the battle to date, offers convincing evidence that the fourteenth-century battle instead took place 5.5 km to the south.

The English way of war, 1360-1399

This thesis challenges the orthodox view that the years 1360 to 1399 witnessed a period of martial decline for the English.

Making Identities in the Hundred Years War: Aquitaine, Gascony and Béarn

This paper focuses on three phases in which political issues played crucial roles to make Gascon identities in the time of the Hundred Years War.

Routier Perrinet Gressart: Joan of Arc’s Penultimate Enemy

Even my English medievalist colleagues, however reluctantly, must admit that Joan of Arc played a significant role in the Hundred Years War.

Through Trial and Error: Learning and Adaptation in the English Tactical System from Bannockburn to Poitiers

During the late thirteenth century and early fourteenth century, the English in medieval Europe fought in two wars: the Scottish Wars of Independence followed by the Hundred Years War.

The Hundred Years War and the Making of Modern Europe

English and French nationalism were forged through centuries of bitter military rivalry that carved out a new European, and ultimately global, order.

The Rise of a Tax State: Portugal, 1367-1401

This paper uses the case of fourteenth-century Portugal to question a common assumption of “fiscal history” literature, namely the linear relationship between war-related fiscal demands increase the level of taxation.

BOOK REVIEW: A Triple Knot by Emma Campion

BOOK REVIEW: A Triple Knot by Emma Campion I had the pleasure of reading another Emma Campion (Candace Robb) novel recently. Campion, who has written extensively about Alice Perrers, the royal mistress of King Edward III, in her hit, The King’s Mistress, is back on the shelves with a new book released this month entitled: A Triple Knot. This […]

The Image of the City in Peace and War in a Burgundian manuscript of Jean Froissart’s Chronicles

The present essay, which complements a study scheduled for publication in 2000 in a volume arising from a colloquium on the theme Regions and Landscapes held in July 1997 at the International Medieval Congress, Leeds, attempts to build on this work.

Edward III and the Hundred Years War

The period historians call the Hundred Years War, stretching from 1337-1453, brought about a number of changes to England and France.

The Uses Made of History by the Kings of Medieval England

The kings of medieval England, besides using history for the entertainment of themselves and their courts, turned it to practical purposes. They plundered history-books for precedents and other evidences to justify their claims and acts. They also recognised its value as propaganda, to bolster up their positions at home and strengthen their hands abroad.

How Shall a Man Be Armed? Evolution of Armor during the Hundred Years War

Special presentation at the 2013 International Congress on Medieval Studies

The Battle of Agincourt: An Alternative Location?

A recent archaeological survey on the Agincourt battlefield has, however, failed to find positive artefactual evidence of the conflict on the officially designated battlefield site.

English Royal Minorities and the Hundred Years War

It has become commonplace in modern textbooks to base any brief account of the Hundred Years War on the contention that the chief cause was the dynastic dispute over the French throne between Edward III and Philip of Valois.

Great Battles Medieval released on iPad

If you are looking to re-fight the Hundred Years War on your iPad, the game Great Battles Medieval might be for you!

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