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Medieval News

Historian explores the Viking connection to Frisia

Frisia, the coastal region between the Zwin (near Bruges) and the Weser (near Bremen), was linked to the Viking world around the North Sea more closely in the Viking age (c. 800-1050) than we supposed – particularly to England and Denmark.

Early medieval loom discovered in northern Iraq

A team of Frankfurt-based archaeologists has returned from the Iraqi-Kurdish province of Sulaymaniyah with new findings. The discovery of a loom from the 5th to 6th century AD in particular caused a stir.

Medieval treasure discovered at the Abbey of Cluny

In mid-September, a large treasure was unearthed during a dig at the Abbey of Cluny, in the French department of Saône-et-Loire.

Medieval sites both saved and at risk in the new Heritage at Risk Register

Historic England reveals sites at risk and places rescued, including several medieval buildings, as the 2017 Heritage at Risk Register is published.

Major Michelangelo exhibition to begin next week at The Met

Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from November 13, 2017, through February 12, 2018, will present a stunning range and number of works by the artist.

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Medieval Articles

Women and Demons in the Late Medieval Wall Paintings in the Church of Espoo (Finland)

The aim of the article is primarily to examine late medieval wall paintings in the church of Espoo that include women with some form of diabolical entity.

The Walking Dead in Medieval England: Literary and Archaeological Perspectives

The aim of this study is to analyse the popular perception of the walking dead – ‘revenants’ – in medieval England, using both written and archaeological sources.

Time Loves a Hero: Alarcos, Alfonso IX, and A Lost Crusade (from 1197)

There are few kings that get such a consistently bad rap in medieval Iberian studies as Alfonso IX of Leon.

Making or Breaking a King: Kingship Ideals in Anglo-Saxon Historiography

This research will fit into the niche between works on specific kings and the analyses of those texts pertaining directly to them, since it will add a comparative angle. It will discover the ways in which written medieval sources created a literary image of a king, as opposed to only preserving the facts.

Across the North Sea and Back Again: A Comparative Study between the Cults of St. Olav and St. Edmund

This thesis serves to examine the transmission of royal missionary saints between Norway and England during the eleventh and twelfth centuries, focused on the cult of St. Olav and the cult of St. Edmund.

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Medieval Videos

Communities of Death in Medieval Iceland

In Iceland, the introduction of Christianity around 1000 AD was associated with fundamental chnges in burial customs.

Two Lessons from Late Medieval Politics

Mass culture tells us that medieval political life was somewhat like ‘Game of Thrones’. This image is rather far from the complexities of late medieval politics, where institutions played at least as big a role as kings and queens.

Jewish and Christian Co-existence in Byzantine Palestine

According to the traditional picture, the Christianization of Palestine since Constantine led to a rapid deterioration of the position of the Jews already during the Byzantine period. However, if one takes into account a wider range of sources, one discovers a quite different picture.

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Medieval Books

New Medieval Books: Martin Luther

Five new books that look at the man who was the catalyst for the Protestant Reformation.

Book Tour: Heroines of the Medieval World by Sharon Bennett Connolly

This November, Medievalists.net is pleased to feature Sharon Connolly’s book tour for Heroines of the Medieval World. The book shares the stories of women, famous, infamous, and unknown, who shaped the course of medieval history.

Book Review: Medievalism: A Manifesto

A rallying cry for scholars in general to harness the power of public platforms to better society.

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Medieval Movies & TV

Medievalists at the Movies: King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword premiered May 2017 MAN CANDY ALERT! When I sat down to watch “King Arthur” over this past weekend, I was a bit apprehensive. This big-budget, big-name feature film didn’t last very long in theaters (never a good sign) and it received overall negative reviews (typically, not always, not a […]

Medievalists at the Movies: Assassin’s Creed

In between the exciting chases, hand-to-hand combat, and surprisingly well-acted dialogue, the overall film drags with too many flat moments of the lead actors staring into the camera or watching something happening from afar.

Get ready for medieval zombies on film!

Horror just got medieval! An Australian filmmaker is set to expand a short film about crusaders fighting zombies, hoping to create a web series. A fundraising campaign is now underway to give Black Crusade the chance to unleash its undead horde.

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More Medieval History

Making the Medieval Relevant: Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies on Disease and Disability

A summary of a paper given by Professor Christina Lee at the University of Nottingham’s “Making the Medieval Relevant” Conference.

Imprisonment, Execution and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum

The final talk in Sesson #1041, Engaging the Public with the Medieval World, looked at what English children are being taught in school. How much medieval history is in the new programme that was released in September 2014? Megan Gooch, Curator at the Historic Royal Palaces breaks down the English system for us in her paper, ‘Imprisonment, Execution, and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum’.

Making the Castle a Home: Creating an Immersive Medieval World Using Live Costumed Interpreters

How does the use of unscripted, adaptive, historical interpretation boost the tourist experience? Right on the heels of our look at the Tower of London’s visitor engagement, we heard a paper from Lauren Johnson, Research Manager for Past Pleasures, the oldest historical interpretation company in the UK who educate and entertain the public at historical sites, museums, on stage and and on TV.

‘But Where are the Dungeons?’: How to Engage the Public at the Tower of London

A talk about how historical sites, like the Tower of London engage the public. How to handle visitor expectations, what do people come t see and how to tell history in a captivating but accurate manner.

Kindred of the Sea – Young Adult Fiction series about the Vikings

These three novels in the series Kindred of the Sea, by C.J. Adrien, are aimed at a young adult/teen audience

Daughter of Destiny, by Nicole Evelina

Before queenship and Camelot, Guinevere was a priestess of Avalon. She loved another before Arthur, a warrior who would one day betray her.

The Last Kingdom: An Interview with Bernard Cornwell

What I find most compelling is the struggle to create a country which became England, a struggle that must have seemed hopeless at times and which roiled Britain in constant fighting. We think of England (especially) as a peaceful landscape, but in the 9th, 10th and 11th centuries it was horribly brutal and merciless.

1390 AD: London in the Late Middle Ages

Last week, we spoke with Dr. Matthew Green about his new History of London course. This week, we take a peek into the first lecture of the series, a ‘teaser’ on Medieval London in 1390.

Teaching Historical Theory through Video Games

The potential of video games for teaching history is receiving increasing recognition. However, the greatest emphasis is on their use as tools in secondary education. The few studies focusing on undergraduate education demonstrate the use of games to create an immersive historical experience with counterfactual options.

Minecraft and the Middle Ages

It is one of the most popular video games ever created. Moreover, educators are finding ways to use Minecraft as a teaching tool, and one that could be ideal for learning about the Middle Ages.

Gareth Hinds’ Beowulf

Dark and visceral, the graphic novel version of Beowulf created by Gareth Hinds is considered to be one of the most successful adaptations of the Old English tale.

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