• Travel Tips for the Medieval Pilgrim

    William Wey, a 15th century pilgrim, gives his travel tips for those going to medieval Jerusalem.

    Travel Tips for the Medieval Pilgrim
  • Book Review: Assassin’s Creed: Trial by Fire

    By Danièle Cybulskie Assassin’s Creed: Trial by Fire, a compilation of the first five comic books in the new Assassin’s Creed series, comes from the same writers that brought us the immensely popular Kill Shakespeare, a comic series that playfully wreaked havoc with Shakespeare’s canon, while drawing in a whole new audience to his plays. Written… [Continue Reading]

    Book Review: Assassin’s Creed: Trial by Fire
  • Medieval Cooking Tips

    From boiling vegetables to smelly pots, here are 10 medieval cooking tips from the 10th century.

    Medieval Cooking Tips
  • Christine the Astonishing

    By Danièle Cybulskie This week, I read the story of Christine the Astonishing for the first time (in Medieval Writings on Female Spirituality, translated by Elizabeth Spearing), and it struck me that while it’s meant to be the story of a holy woman’s life, it also gives us an intimate look at what was likely… [Continue Reading]

    Christine the Astonishing
  • The Medieval Magazine (Volume 2 Issue 19)

    Welcome to our first issues under new editors Sandra Alvarez and Danielle Trynoski. We’re bringing you a bigger, better issue, with more features, articles, books and travel than ever before.

    The Medieval Magazine (Volume 2 Issue 19)
  • How to Cheat on a Virginity Test

    During the Middle Ages a woman’s virginity was highly prized. A lady was expected not to have sex until she was married, and that her wedding night would be a kind of test to show that she had remained ‘pure’. However, if she did have sex before, was there a way she could cheat on this test?

    How to Cheat on a Virginity Test
  • The Fantastical Shoemaker and the Head of Death

    By Danièle Cybulskie This week, I came across one of those great medieval stories that is just too good not to share: “The Fantastical Shoemaker of Constantinople”. This twisted tale comes from Walter Map’s twelfth-century miscellany De Nugis Curialium or Courtiers’ Trifles, and all quotes you’ll find below come from Richard Sowerby‘s reader-friendly translation in the great collection… [Continue Reading]

    The Fantastical Shoemaker and the Head of Death

Medieval News

Call for Papers

Call for Papers: Medieval Studies on Television Screens

For the 27th Annual Conference of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association, Atlantic City, New Jersey, 3-5 November 2016

Mediterranean Castle for Sale

Mediterranean Castle for Sale

This 14th century castle can be found along the coast of Calabria in Italy.

Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem. (Wikipedia)

Crusaders, Pilgrims, and Relics – Bearers of the Cross: Material Religion in the Crusading World 1095-1300

The Museum of the Order of St. John is hosting a series of events and talks to promote their project: Bearers of the Cross: Material Religion in the Crusading World 1095-1300.

Medieval Warfare Magazine – Volume 6 Issue 2

Medieval Warfare Magazine – Volume 6 Issue 2

A new issue of Medieval Warfare Magazine is about to hit the shelves. The theme for this issue is the War of the Sicilian Vespers.

Before and after pictures of Castle Matrera. (Photo by The Guardian)

Outrage in Matrera Over Botched Castle Restoration

A botched restoration attempt in Spain has garnered international attention and condemnation from locals, historians and conservationists.

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Medieval Articles

Byzantine crescent - photo by  fusion-of-horizons / Flickr

Diorasis denied: Opposition to clairvoyance in Byzantium from late Antiquity to the eleventh century

This article treats the phenomenon of clairvoyance, the ability to know the thoughts of others that set holy men apart from ordinary human beings who had to make inferences from a person’s outward appearance.

View of the Palais des Papes in Avignon, France. 17th century

Plague, Papacy and Power: The Effect of the Black Plague on the Avignon Papacy

The plague came at a critical moment for the Church, and the papacy at Avignon did not adequately rise to the challenge.

Drawing by Antony van den Wyngaerde View of London - The Tower of London - 16th century

‘Ill-Liver of Her Body:’ A Legal Examination of Prostitution in Late Medieval Greater London

I will be examining how women—specifically prostitutes—were placed under male authority and marginalized in London and Southwark, despite the divergent legal practices seen in these two adjacent areas of Greater London.

Bayeux tapestry scene

The Battle of Hastings: A Geographic Perspective

The Battle of Hastings is one of the most widely studied battles in medieval history. Yet despite the importance that research shows geography to play in the outcome of such conflicts, few studies have examined in detail the landscape of the battle or the role the landscape played in its eventual outcome.

A wet and cold period followed upon a few warm and dry years. The interplay of various environmental factors may have led the Mongolians to the decision to withdraw from Hungary. Red line: Summer temperatures derived from tree-rings in the Alps and Carpathians. Green and brown shades indicate soil moisture in 1242 CE. (Graphic: Ulf Büntgen/WSL)

Climatic and environmental aspects of the Mongol withdrawal from Hungary in 1242 CE

The Mongol invasion of Eastern Europe, and especially its sudden withdrawal from Hungary in 1242 CE, has generated much speculation and an array of controversial theories. None of them, however, considered multifaceted environmental drivers and the coupled analysis of historical reports and natural archives.

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Medieval Videos

Art as data: Studying corpses by drawing them

This paper addresses the potentials of treating art as data, drawing examples from my current research on corpse positioning in early Anglo-Saxon England.

Archaeological Landscapes and Digital Geography

Dominic Powlesland discusses the evolution of archaeological computing for research and publication: was it worth it? has it changed the past? could it have been done without the silicon chip?

Goodbye to the Vikings

Vladimir Polach talks about how scholars are researching the Vikings.

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Medieval Books

Joan of Kent: The First Princess of Wales

Jean Froissart, probably the most famous of the fourteenth-century chroniclers, described Joan as ‘in her time the most beautiful woman in all the realm of England and the most loved’

BOOK REVIEW: The Northern Queen by Kelly Evans

Kelly Evans’Anglo-Saxon novel centres around the story of Aelfgifu of Northampton (990-1040); from her rise in court and eventual marriage to one of England’s most famous early kings, Cnut the Great (995-1035), to her repudiation, and later life with her sons after Cnut’s passing.

BOOK REVIEW: Spies, Sadists, and Sorcerers: The History You Weren’t Taught in School

A review of Dominic Selwood’s, ‘Spies, Sadists, and Sorcerers: The History you Weren’t Taught in School’

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Medieval Movies & TV

Movie Review: Pope Joan – Medieval Legend Comes to Life Onscreen

Released in 2009, also under its German title, ,Die Päpstin,, ,Pope Joan’ recounts the medieval legend of Johanna von Ingleheim, a woman who disguised herself as a man, lived as a monk, and eventually went on to become pope in the ninth century.

The World’s Worst Fantasy Film: In the Name of the King

What do you get when you mix Burt Reynolds, Jason Statham, Ray Liotta and Ron Perlman in a movie together? You get a horrible movie. Those worlds are never meant to collide, and never in a fantasy movie.

Friendship, Betrayal, War: “Soldier of God” Movie Review

A Templar and a Muslim; their strange friendship is the premise of this week’s movie based in the 12th century immediately after the disastrous Battle of Hattin.

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More Medieval History

Making the Medieval Relevant: Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies on Disease and Disability

A summary of a paper given by Professor Christina Lee at the University of Nottingham’s “Making the Medieval Relevant” Conference.

Imprisonment, Execution and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum

The final talk in Sesson #1041, Engaging the Public with the Medieval World, looked at what English children are being taught in school. How much medieval history is in the new programme that was released in September 2014? Megan Gooch, Curator at the Historic Royal Palaces breaks down the English system for us in her paper, ‘Imprisonment, Execution, and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum’.

Making the Castle a Home: Creating an Immersive Medieval World Using Live Costumed Interpreters

How does the use of unscripted, adaptive, historical interpretation boost the tourist experience? Right on the heels of our look at the Tower of London’s visitor engagement, we heard a paper from Lauren Johnson, Research Manager for Past Pleasures, the oldest historical interpretation company in the UK who educate and entertain the public at historical sites, museums, on stage and and on TV.

‘But Where are the Dungeons?’: How to Engage the Public at the Tower of London

A talk about how historical sites, like the Tower of London engage the public. How to handle visitor expectations, what do people come t see and how to tell history in a captivating but accurate manner.

Kindred of the Sea – Young Adult Fiction series about the Vikings

These three novels in the series Kindred of the Sea, by C.J. Adrien, are aimed at a young adult/teen audience

Daughter of Destiny, by Nicole Evelina

Before queenship and Camelot, Guinevere was a priestess of Avalon. She loved another before Arthur, a warrior who would one day betray her.

The Last Kingdom: An Interview with Bernard Cornwell

What I find most compelling is the struggle to create a country which became England, a struggle that must have seemed hopeless at times and which roiled Britain in constant fighting. We think of England (especially) as a peaceful landscape, but in the 9th, 10th and 11th centuries it was horribly brutal and merciless.

Teaching Historical Theory through Video Games

The potential of video games for teaching history is receiving increasing recognition. However, the greatest emphasis is on their use as tools in secondary education. The few studies focusing on undergraduate education demonstrate the use of games to create an immersive historical experience with counterfactual options.

Minecraft and the Middle Ages

It is one of the most popular video games ever created. Moreover, educators are finding ways to use Minecraft as a teaching tool, and one that could be ideal for learning about the Middle Ages.

Gareth Hinds’ Beowulf

Dark and visceral, the graphic novel version of Beowulf created by Gareth Hinds is considered to be one of the most successful adaptations of the Old English tale.

Using LEGO to teach the Middle Ages

Here are a few ideas that teachers can use to teach the Middle Ages with LEGO

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