Werewolves and snakewomen

(Illustration to folio CXLI of L'Histoire de la Belle Mélusine published by Steinschaber in 1478 , depicting the scene of Remondin’s discovery of his wife’s animal-human hybrid form. The wall has been removed so that the reader, who knows she takes this form once a week, may see what is going on inside. Note that Mélusine is dressed as a noble lady and clearly has both human and animal body parts.)

Dr Miranda Griffin, College Lecturer in medieval French literature, provides a fascinating investigation of medieval tales of transformation, exploring the way in which the Middle Ages imagined the frontiers between the human and the animal.

Interview with Tamas Kiss of CEU Medieval Radio

CEU Medieval Radio

CEU Medieval Radio is currently the only medieval themed radio on the internet which plays only authentic medieval and renaissance music from the Iberian Peninsula to the Ottoman Empire.

The British History Podcast

The British History Podcast

With over seventy episodes recorded, the British History Podcast is giving people a lot to listen too.

Medieval Podcasts

Photo by Patrick Breitenbach / Flickr

Here are eighteen podcasts/radio programs you can listen to which offer great content on the Middle Ages.

In Our Time: Marco Polo

The Polos leaving Constantinople in 1259-1260 - 15th century manuscript

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the celebrated Venetian explorer Marco Polo.

The Sword Brothers – Knights Templars, Hospitallers and Teutonic Knights


Listen to the three-part programme The Sword Brothers, broadcast by the CBC radio show Ideas

Famine, War and Plague: In Search of a Medieval Crisis

Irish History Podcast

In the 14th century Europe experienced one of the worst crises in recorded human history which saw war, famine and plague decimate the population. In Ireland this crisis developed in a society already wracked by deep divisions and political upheaval.

Hospitals and leper houses in the Latin west during the Middle Ages


Audio podcast of a lecture by John Hine Mundy

Medieval Christmas Cookies Still In Fashion

christmas cookies

So what does a Christmas cookie from centuries ago look like? This time of year, a bakery in Pennsylvania Dutch country is busy making cookies the same way they were made in medieval Germany, and their edible pieces of art history have attracted customers from all over the globe.

In Our Time: The Medieval University

In Our Time: The Medieval University BBC Radio 4 First Broadcast March 2011 In the 11th and 12th centuries a new type of institution started to appear in the major cities of Europe. The first universities were those of Bologna and Paris; within a hundred years similar educational organisations were springing up all over the […]

The Beast Within: Animals in the Middle Ages

beast within

The Beast Within: Animals in the Middle Ages By Joyce Salisbury Second Edition Routledge, 2010 ISBN: 978-0-415-78095-7 Publisher’s Synopsis: This important book offers a unique exploration of the use of and attitude towards animals from the 4th to the 14th centuries. The Beast Within explores the varying roles of animals as property, food and sexual […]

Amor vs. Roma: Cathars and the Birth of the Inquisition

Amor vs. Roma: Cathars and the Birth of the Inquisition From the CBC Radio series Ideas, this 2-part show examines the rise and fall of the Cathars, medieval Christians who were pacifist, ecstatic, feminist, and contrary to the Catholic Church of thirteenth century France. They were exterminated in a classic crusade and Inquisition, invented to […]

In Our Time: Battle of Bannockburn


From the BBC Radio programme: In Our Time Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the Battle of Bannockburn. On June 23rd 1314, Scottish forces under their king Robert the Bruce confronted a larger army commanded by the English monarch Edward II at Bannockburn. It was the culmination of a war of independence which had been going […]

Fighting for the Cross: Crusading to the Holy Land

Fighting for the Cross

Fighting for the Cross: Crusading to the Holy Land By Norman Housley Yale University Press, 2008 ISBN:  9780300118889 Publisher’s Synopsis: In a series of massive military undertakings that stretched from 1095 to 1291, Christendom’s armies won, defended, and lost the sacred sites of the Holy Land. Many books have been written about the Crusades, but until […]

The Tale of Genji – podcast by Teresa Goff

17th century depiction of Murasaki Shikibu

Written a thousand years ago by Murasaki Shikibu, a 30 year-old lady in waiting of the 11th century Japanese Heian Court, The Tale of Genji is considered the world’s first novel. It’s a story of politics and intrigue, of sexual conquests, frustrated love and jealousy, of the relationship between art and nature, and of the […]

Wars of the Roses – Podcasts

The battle of Tewkesbury, depicted in a Ghent manuscript

The Wars of the Roses is one of the most important events of late medieval English history.  Lasting from 1455 to 1485, it was series of civil wars for the throne of England, fought between supporters of two rival families: the houses of Lancaster and York. A series of six podcasts has been produced by […]

BBC: Woman’s Hour

Woman’s Hour is a radio magazine programme broadcast on BBC Radio 4. It has been running since 1946 and consists of reports, interviews and debates on a wide variety of topics ostensibly aimed at women and mothers. Over the years the show has had segments related to medieval history, including: Medieval Golden Age – The […]

BBC: The Long View


The Long View is a radio programme aired on BBC Radio 4 that examines present day events from a historical perspective. Some of the earlier programmes can still be heard through the BBC website, including four episodes that deal with medieval history: Thomas Beckett and Church and State From 2002: The delicate relationship between Church […]

Medieval History Podcasts from the National Archives

The National Archives of the United Kingdom have been developing a series of podcasts about British history since 2006, covering all areas of history including the Middle Ages. The podcasts focus on the records held at the National Archives and how these records can be used by historians and the general public. Click here to […]

Medieval Economics for the Peasant

Medieval peasants

The first part of the podcast provides an overview of how a typical medieval economy worked, including the role of guilds, knights and peasants.

The myth of the medieval chastity belt

A 16th-century German satirical colored woodcut whose general theme is the uselessness of chastity belts in ensuring the faithfulness of beautiful young wives married to old ugly husbands. The young wife is dipping into the bag of money which her old husband is offering to give her (to encourage her to remain placidly in the chastity belt he has locked on her), but she intends to use it to buy her freedom to enjoy her young handsome lover (who is bringing her a key).

Medieval scholar Albrecht Classen exposes the chastity belt as a popular myth that proliferated in the 19th century. After reviewing the evidence of the existence of the chastity belt, he found that scant research had been carried out, and that the chastity belt was a byproduct of the 19th-century fascination with instruments of torture from medieval times.

Ethnogenesis: A Contested Model of Early Medieval Europe

Ethnogenesis: A Contested Model of Early Medieval Europe Audio podcast given at Macquarie University (February 2007) Length: 20 minutes This podcast is a discussion between Professor Felice Lifshitz, History Compass’ medieval Europe editor, and Dr Andrew Gillett, a published History Compass author. They examine Dr Gillet’s published essay, ‘Ethnogenesis: A Contested Model of Early Medieval […]

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