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Support The Big Dig on Wheels

The School of Irish Archaeology is the choice of activity for the curious child. We take pride in introducing children to Ireland’s rich culture and heritage through interactive ‘Big Digs’, where they get a hands-on experience of a real archaeological site. Is your child an adventurer? An explorer? Do they spend enough time in the […]

Viking Bling: Five Fabulous Hoards

Humans are like magpies. Or maybe squirrels make for a better analogy. Either way, some of us like to collect stuff. The need to collect manifests itself as a hobby, affliction, or obsession depending on the person, however it usually has interesting results. One of those results is medieval hoards. These buried collections of shiny, […]

Medievalists at the Movies: King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword premiered May 2017 MAN CANDY ALERT! When I sat down to watch “King Arthur” over this past weekend, I was a bit apprehensive. This big-budget, big-name feature film didn’t last very long in theaters (never a good sign) and it received overall negative reviews (typically, not always, not a […]

Making Your Mark: Medieval Masons’ Marks at Tarascon

How do you operate a business when you can’t read and your knowledge of math is extremely limited? Making your mark on the dotted line (as they used to say) could seal the deal or in the Middle Ages, finalize your invoice at the end of the day’s work. On a recent visit to southern […]

Illuminating Women in the Medieval World at the Getty

New exhibit open now at the Getty Museum! Illuminating Women in the Medieval World June 20-September 17, 2017 Curated by Christine Sciacca Modern portrayals of medieval women tend toward stereotypical images of damsels in distress, mystics in convents, female laborers in the fields, and even women of ill repute. In fact, women’s roles in the […]

A Fortress Built of Salt

The mountains and hills of Spain are covered in many little towns. They are more than picturesque; so charming that they’re almost saccharine. In some of these little towns, which used to be great town centers in the medieval past, there are towering reminders of their previous glory. In the town of Cardona in Catalonia, […]

The Newberry Library Announces Year-Long ‘Religious Change’ Project

Coinciding with the 500th anniversary of Luther’s 95 Theses, the project will include public programs, digital resources, and a gallery exhibition The Newberry Library in Chicago, Illinois announces the public launch of Religious Change, 1450 – 1700, a multidisciplinary project drawing on the full range of the library’s programs, services, and staff expertise. Coinciding with […]

Koroneburg Renaissance Festival Returns!

Koroneburg Renaissance Festival is excited to once again open its doors on weekends starting May 27 through June 25, 2017 after several years of being shuttered. Thanks to new management, Koroneburg Renaissance Festival has been revitalized in order to offer the most interactive history faire experience in communities adjacent to Los Angeles, California. “Our goal […]

The Weird, the Wonderful, and the Macabre in the Cathedral of Narbonne

Narbonne is one of those European cities with evidence of its past on every street. This important Roman city was adopted in the Middle Ages, with multiple cases of re-use. One example includes the Roman subterranean grain storage chambers known as the Horreum used as medieval cellars. The Via Domitia, one of the main Roman […]

The “Mona Lisa” of Medieval Art

While the subject of Da Vinci’s famous Renaissance painting is likely identifiable as Lisa del Giocondo, a.k.a. Lisa Gherardini, her enigmatic expression has captivated generations. Medieval art has its own enigma: the woman featured in the Lady and the Unicorn tapestries. This tapestry set contains some of the most well-known images from medieval art, yet […]

Fish on Friday III: From Fish Weir to Table

It’s no mystery that medieval people ate fish. The fish industry was a vital element of the medieval European economy, and fueled lots of movement around the continent. However how did they get onto the trestle tables and trenchers?

Fish on Friday II: Monastic Meals

In the Middle Ages, fasting and Lenten traditions were highly evident in the monastic houses. The different Rules and Orders (take your pick from Benedictine, Carthusian, Cluniac, Cistercian, Premonstratensians, Trinitarians, Beguines, and more!) had strict rules governing their lifestyles, including their diet, nutrition, and meals. Where, When, What, and How Much? Monastic communities ate their […]

Fish on Friday I: Economic Blessing or Dietary Sacrifice?

A lack of red meat on the medieval table meant the diners were having a humble meal, and fish was a convenient substitute protein.

Nothing Lovelier than Spring (Gardening) in Paris

Wondering what to plant in your garden this year? Take some advice from an elderly gentleman living in a big city!

Remembering Antiquity: The Ancient World Through Medieval Eyes

Exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center January 25-May 28, 2017 This remarkable collaborative exhibit takes a head-on approach to the notion that there were divisions between a Roman Age, a Middle Age, and then the dawning of the glorious Renaissance. Medieval people had no notion of a noticeable chronological progression; […]

Dancing into Battle

At the end of every Olympic Games, several countries take home medals in the sport of Dressage. This graceful event evaluates the movement, athleticism, and obedience of the horse and its harmony with the rider. The Dressage test is a list of specific movements executed before a judge. The horse-and-rider team receive a score (out […]

Crenellations: Crowning Castles

Crenellations are one of the most recognizable elements of a medieval castle. These upright projections resemble teeth, bared at invaders to prevent their attempted entries and at allies to show the owner’s strength. Each upright section is called a merlon or crenel, and they protected defenders from attacks. Defenses could be further increased by the […]

The Tower-House Castle: Not Exactly Fit for a King

House, Tower, Castle. It’s like a weird hand of Cards Against Humanity or Apples to Apples but these special types of castles are common in Scotland and Ireland. The 13th century concentric castles of Edward I, a.k.a. Longshanks, a.k.a. Hammer of the Scots, are some of the most well-known surviving medieval structures. His castles are […]

Medievalists at the Movies: Assassin’s Creed

In between the exciting chases, hand-to-hand combat, and surprisingly well-acted dialogue, the overall film drags with too many flat moments of the lead actors staring into the camera or watching something happening from afar.

The Monarchy’s Symbols of Power

Medieval monarchs are remembered as powerful rulers, with a tyrannical control of land, nobles, and riches. They were strong figures, in control of their realm and their lives. However, medieval rulers also existed in a daily display of that power and authority. Even if a king was born into his position, he still needed to […]

Talkin’ the Medieval Bob Dylans

On October 4, 2016, the Swedish Academy announced that singer/songwriter Bob Dylan would receive the Nobel Prize in literature.

Top 15 Etsy Picks for a Medievalist

  Let’s face it, it’s just plain difficult to find the perfect gift sometimes! You want it to be unique, a great match for the recipient, a sign of your affection and esteem, and maybe even have a little medieval flair. We’ve scoured the world of Etsy for the weird, wonderful, and medieval products available […]

Want a new Medieval LEGO kit? Vote now!

Here at Medievalists.net, we support all kinds of medieval endeavors including Kickstarter campaigns, movie productions, and now LEGO Ideas! Ben Pitchford contacted us through our Facebook page and shared his delightful Watermill inspired by medieval architecture. Now he wants the design to be considered by LEGO, and he needs YOUR votes! Keep reading for his […]

The Getty Enchants with Alchemy Exhibits

Long shrouded in secrecy, alchemy was once considered the highest of arts. Straddling art, science, and natural philosophy, alchemy has proven key to both the materiality and creative expression embedded in artistic output, from ancient sculpture and the decorative arts to medieval illumination, and masterpieces in paint, print, and a panoply of media from the European Renaissance to the present day.

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