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  • Discovery of Lost Early Medieval Kingdom in Galloway

    Archaeological research has just been published which reveals the location of a hitherto lost early medieval kingdom that was once pre-eminent in Scotland and Northern England.

    Discovery of Lost Early Medieval Kingdom in Galloway
  • Dressed up with bling stolen in Viking raids

    When a female Norwegian Viking died some time during the ninth century, she was buried wearing a status symbol: a beautiful piece of bronze jewellery worn on her traditional Norse dress.

    Dressed up with bling stolen in Viking raids
  • The Tower-House Castle: Not Exactly Fit for a King

    House, Tower, Castle. It’s like a weird hand of Cards Against Humanity or Apples to Apples but these special types of castles are common in Scotland and Ireland. The 13th century concentric castles of Edward I, a.k.a. Longshanks, a.k.a. Hammer of the Scots, are some of the most well-known surviving medieval structures. His castles are… [Continue Reading]

    The Tower-House Castle: Not Exactly Fit for a King
  • The Medieval Magazine: #Engaging the Medieval (Volume 3 Issue 1)

    New Year, New You? Kicking off the first issue of 2017 with a look at how we as historians, scholars and the general public, engage with history.

    The Medieval Magazine: #Engaging the Medieval (Volume 3 Issue 1)
  • Top 10 Medieval News Stories of 2016

    These last twelve months have seen more discoveries and great research about the Middle Ages. However, in keeping with the theme that 2016 is the worst year ever, our most important story is a depressing tale for medievalists.

    Top 10 Medieval News Stories of 2016
  • A Vision of Baby Jesus from 1344

    The story told by Margaretha Ebner is a fascinating one – an intimate experience with the Baby Jesus. In her own words, she describes powerful visions of being with the infant, and even breastfeeding him.

    A Vision of Baby Jesus from 1344
  • How to Party Like It’s 1399

    The holiday season is upon us once again, which means that it’s time to get medieval and party like there’s no fifteenth century!

    How to Party Like It’s 1399

Medieval News

Discovery of Lost Early Medieval Kingdom in Galloway

Archaeological research has just been published which reveals the location of a hitherto lost early medieval kingdom that was once pre-eminent in Scotland and Northern England.

Dressed up with bling stolen in Viking raids

When a female Norwegian Viking died some time during the ninth century, she was buried wearing a status symbol: a beautiful piece of bronze jewellery worn on her traditional Norse dress.

Major Viking Age manor discovered in Sweden

Birka, Sweden’s oldest town, has long been a major source of our knowledge about the Viking Age. New geophysical research has now uncovered the ninth-century manor of a royal bailiff at this site.

British Museum acquires medieval alabaster Virgin and Child

The British Museum has acquired an outstanding 14th Century English alabaster figure of the Virgin and Child which is the best-preserved of its kind on display in a UK national collection.

The Golden Haggadah now online

The Golden Haggadah, created in Catalonia around the year 1320, is among several hundred items that have recently been digitised by the British Library as part of the Hebrew Manuscripts Digitisation Project. The project has involved the photographing, description and, where necessary, meticulous conservation of 1,300 items ranging from illuminated service books to Torah scrolls, […]

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Medieval Articles

The Vikings in Orkney

In recent years, it has been suggested that the first permanent Scandinavian presence in Orkney was not the result of forcible land-taking by Vikings, but came about instead through gradual penetration

Identification, Geochemical Characterisation and Significance of Bitumen among the Grave Goods of the 7th Century Mound 1 Ship-Burial at Sutton Hoo (Suffolk, UK)

The 7th century ship-burial at Sutton Hoo is famous for the spectacular treasure discovered when it was first excavated in 1939.

A Family of Mercers in Medieval London

A fourteenth century family coordinating elements of English life, the academy, the church, the crown, land, commerce and family connections to become significant participants in London life.

‘As If Augustine Had Said’: Textual Interpretation and Augustinian Ambiguity in a Medieval Debate on Predestination

This paper reevaluates a sample of Hincmar’s writings in the 840s and 850s to argue that he sought to make explicit what Augustine had left unclear regarding predestination by appealing to common standards of orthodoxy in the forms of additional patristic authors, conciliar judgments, and liturgical practices.

The Scapegoat: Impotence and Witchcraft in the Middle Ages

This essay investigates the question of how women were used as scapegoats for male impotence during the Witch Craze.

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Medieval Videos

Understanding Castle Rushen

Castle Rushen has been at the heart of Manx history, politics and life for over 800 years and has changed radically over time as its purpose and context has altered. It is surely the most important structure on the Island.

Medieval Big Bang Theory: An Interdisciplinary Tale

In his De luce (on light) he extends it to the origin of the Universe in what has been referred to as the ‘Medieval Big Bang’.

The Growth of London as a Port from Roman to Medieval Times

Rather than describing a history of the port of London, it seems more appropriate to say PORTS of London, since the locations, vessels, cargoes and waterfront facilities differed as much as the prevalent languages, cultures and currencies.

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Medieval Books

The Shadow of the Cross: Book Tour and Giveaway!

Graphic novel fans! Today, we’re hosting day 2 of Dmitry Yakhovsky‘s Book Tour and running an international contest to give away a copy of his latest graphic novel: The Shadow of the Cross Want a chance to win it? Subscribe to our free newsletter and send us an email by December 23 answering this question: What fresco would Dmitry like to paint? (a […]

Autumn of the Middle Ages: A Century Later

Taking a look at the influence of Johan Huizinga’s Autumn of the Middle Ages.

30 Medieval Texts Translated in 2016

From biographies of the leading warriors to the grumbling of a government official, here are thirty medieval texts that have been translated in 2016.

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Medieval Movies & TV

Medievalists at the Movies: Assassin’s Creed

In between the exciting chases, hand-to-hand combat, and surprisingly well-acted dialogue, the overall film drags with too many flat moments of the lead actors staring into the camera or watching something happening from afar.

Get ready for medieval zombies on film!

Horror just got medieval! An Australian filmmaker is set to expand a short film about crusaders fighting zombies, hoping to create a web series. A fundraising campaign is now underway to give Black Crusade the chance to unleash its undead horde.

Movie Review: Pope Joan – Medieval Legend Comes to Life Onscreen

Released in 2009, also under its German title, ,Die Päpstin,, ,Pope Joan’ recounts the medieval legend of Johanna von Ingleheim, a woman who disguised herself as a man, lived as a monk, and eventually went on to become pope in the ninth century.

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More Medieval History

Making the Medieval Relevant: Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies on Disease and Disability

A summary of a paper given by Professor Christina Lee at the University of Nottingham’s “Making the Medieval Relevant” Conference.

Imprisonment, Execution and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum

The final talk in Sesson #1041, Engaging the Public with the Medieval World, looked at what English children are being taught in school. How much medieval history is in the new programme that was released in September 2014? Megan Gooch, Curator at the Historic Royal Palaces breaks down the English system for us in her paper, ‘Imprisonment, Execution, and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum’.

Making the Castle a Home: Creating an Immersive Medieval World Using Live Costumed Interpreters

How does the use of unscripted, adaptive, historical interpretation boost the tourist experience? Right on the heels of our look at the Tower of London’s visitor engagement, we heard a paper from Lauren Johnson, Research Manager for Past Pleasures, the oldest historical interpretation company in the UK who educate and entertain the public at historical sites, museums, on stage and and on TV.

‘But Where are the Dungeons?’: How to Engage the Public at the Tower of London

A talk about how historical sites, like the Tower of London engage the public. How to handle visitor expectations, what do people come t see and how to tell history in a captivating but accurate manner.

Kindred of the Sea – Young Adult Fiction series about the Vikings

These three novels in the series Kindred of the Sea, by C.J. Adrien, are aimed at a young adult/teen audience

Daughter of Destiny, by Nicole Evelina

Before queenship and Camelot, Guinevere was a priestess of Avalon. She loved another before Arthur, a warrior who would one day betray her.

The Last Kingdom: An Interview with Bernard Cornwell

What I find most compelling is the struggle to create a country which became England, a struggle that must have seemed hopeless at times and which roiled Britain in constant fighting. We think of England (especially) as a peaceful landscape, but in the 9th, 10th and 11th centuries it was horribly brutal and merciless.

1390 AD: London in the Late Middle Ages

Last week, we spoke with Dr. Matthew Green about his new History of London course. This week, we take a peek into the first lecture of the series, a ‘teaser’ on Medieval London in 1390.

Teaching Historical Theory through Video Games

The potential of video games for teaching history is receiving increasing recognition. However, the greatest emphasis is on their use as tools in secondary education. The few studies focusing on undergraduate education demonstrate the use of games to create an immersive historical experience with counterfactual options.

Minecraft and the Middle Ages

It is one of the most popular video games ever created. Moreover, educators are finding ways to use Minecraft as a teaching tool, and one that could be ideal for learning about the Middle Ages.

Gareth Hinds’ Beowulf

Dark and visceral, the graphic novel version of Beowulf created by Gareth Hinds is considered to be one of the most successful adaptations of the Old English tale.

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