Advertisement

Medieval News

Thousands of Vikings were based at Torksey camp, archaeologists find

A huge camp which was home to thousands of Vikings as they prepared to conquer England in the late ninth century has been uncovered by archaeologists.

World Championships in medieval combat comes to Denmark

Over 500 fighters from 28 different countries will be taking part at Spøttrup Castle.

Scotland’s most important medieval charters now on display

For the first time precious examples from two of Scotland’s most important collections of medieval charters are going on show in National Records of Scotland.

The Hidden Symbols of Fertility in Michelangelo’s Medici Chapel

Michelangelo often surreptitiously inserted pagan symbols into his works of art, many of them possibly associated with anatomical representations. A new analysis suggests that Michelangelo may have concealed symbols associated with female anatomy within his famous work in the Medici Chapel.Michelangelo often surreptitiously inserted pagan symbols into his works of art, many of them possibly associated with anatomical representations. A new analysis suggests that Michelangelo may have concealed symbols associated with female anatomy within his famous work in the Medici Chapel.

When did the Vikings start raiding England?

A fresh examination of written records from Anglo-Saxon England suggests that the Vikings were raiding the country even before their infamous attack on Lindisfarne in the year 793.

More Posts from this Category

Medieval Articles

Infantry versus Cavalry: The Byzantine Response

The Byzantines encountered many different nations on the battlefield during their long history.

How did the Merovingian Kings wear their hair?

We must accept, I think, that the Franks, like all Germans, attached a particular importance to the hair

Eleanor of Aquitaine: A Queen and A Mother

The mere mention of Eleanor of Aquitaine brings to mind an remarkable woman in many respects.

Henry V and the crossing to France: reconstructing naval operations for the Agincourt campaign, 1415

On 11 August 1415 a large fleet slipped out of the Solent and headed to the Chef de Caux.

Verba vana: empty words in Ricardian London

Verba vana: empty words in Ricardian London By Robert Ellis PhD Dissertation, Queen Mary, University of London, 2012 Abstract: Verba Vana, or ‘empty words’, are named as among the defining features of London by a late fourteenth-century Anglo-Latin poem which itemises the properties of seven English cities. This thesis examines the implications of this description; […]

More Posts from this Category

Medieval Videos

Reclaiming past, present and future stories of a deserted medieval village

This practice-based research explores challenges in documenting the physically shifting site of a deserted medieval village, previously an island and now a reclaimed landscape, located on a saltmarsh in East Sussex.

The Shadow of Chinggis Khan on Istanbul: The Ottoman Empire in the Early Modern Asian Context, 1300 – 1600

Prof. Ali Yaycioğlu examines the making of the Ottoman State and socio-economic formation between the late 14th to the 17th centuries.

Baghdad as a Center of Learning and Book Production

Why does Baghdad become some an enormous centre of book production – of literature and the physical production of books?

More Posts from this Category

Medieval Books

New Medieval Books: From Battles to Beds

This week’s look at five new books on the Middle Ages

New Medieval Books: From Bastards to Conquerors

Five new books that look at the powerful and the despised in the Middle Ages.

One Year Anniversary of The Five-Minute Medievalist Book

I’m so excited to announce that this Thursday, April 6th, marks the first anniversary of my little book, The Five-Minute Medievalist!

More Posts from this Category

Medieval Movies & TV

Medievalists at the Movies: Assassin’s Creed

In between the exciting chases, hand-to-hand combat, and surprisingly well-acted dialogue, the overall film drags with too many flat moments of the lead actors staring into the camera or watching something happening from afar.

Get ready for medieval zombies on film!

Horror just got medieval! An Australian filmmaker is set to expand a short film about crusaders fighting zombies, hoping to create a web series. A fundraising campaign is now underway to give Black Crusade the chance to unleash its undead horde.

Movie Review: Pope Joan – Medieval Legend Comes to Life Onscreen

Released in 2009, also under its German title, ,Die Päpstin,, ,Pope Joan’ recounts the medieval legend of Johanna von Ingleheim, a woman who disguised herself as a man, lived as a monk, and eventually went on to become pope in the ninth century.

More Posts from this Category

More Medieval History

Making the Medieval Relevant: Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies on Disease and Disability

A summary of a paper given by Professor Christina Lee at the University of Nottingham’s “Making the Medieval Relevant” Conference.

Imprisonment, Execution and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum

The final talk in Sesson #1041, Engaging the Public with the Medieval World, looked at what English children are being taught in school. How much medieval history is in the new programme that was released in September 2014? Megan Gooch, Curator at the Historic Royal Palaces breaks down the English system for us in her paper, ‘Imprisonment, Execution, and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum’.

Making the Castle a Home: Creating an Immersive Medieval World Using Live Costumed Interpreters

How does the use of unscripted, adaptive, historical interpretation boost the tourist experience? Right on the heels of our look at the Tower of London’s visitor engagement, we heard a paper from Lauren Johnson, Research Manager for Past Pleasures, the oldest historical interpretation company in the UK who educate and entertain the public at historical sites, museums, on stage and and on TV.

‘But Where are the Dungeons?’: How to Engage the Public at the Tower of London

A talk about how historical sites, like the Tower of London engage the public. How to handle visitor expectations, what do people come t see and how to tell history in a captivating but accurate manner.

Kindred of the Sea – Young Adult Fiction series about the Vikings

These three novels in the series Kindred of the Sea, by C.J. Adrien, are aimed at a young adult/teen audience

Daughter of Destiny, by Nicole Evelina

Before queenship and Camelot, Guinevere was a priestess of Avalon. She loved another before Arthur, a warrior who would one day betray her.

The Last Kingdom: An Interview with Bernard Cornwell

What I find most compelling is the struggle to create a country which became England, a struggle that must have seemed hopeless at times and which roiled Britain in constant fighting. We think of England (especially) as a peaceful landscape, but in the 9th, 10th and 11th centuries it was horribly brutal and merciless.

1390 AD: London in the Late Middle Ages

Last week, we spoke with Dr. Matthew Green about his new History of London course. This week, we take a peek into the first lecture of the series, a ‘teaser’ on Medieval London in 1390.

Teaching Historical Theory through Video Games

The potential of video games for teaching history is receiving increasing recognition. However, the greatest emphasis is on their use as tools in secondary education. The few studies focusing on undergraduate education demonstrate the use of games to create an immersive historical experience with counterfactual options.

Minecraft and the Middle Ages

It is one of the most popular video games ever created. Moreover, educators are finding ways to use Minecraft as a teaching tool, and one that could be ideal for learning about the Middle Ages.

Gareth Hinds’ Beowulf

Dark and visceral, the graphic novel version of Beowulf created by Gareth Hinds is considered to be one of the most successful adaptations of the Old English tale.

medievalverse magazine