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Medieval News

St Albans Cathedral Finds Lost Abbot

Archaeologists from the Canterbury Archaeological Trust (CAT) working at St Albans Cathedral have discovered the grave of John of Wheathampstead, a former Abbot of national and international renown, who died in 1465, and whose burial site had remained a mystery up until now. In an extremely rare development, the team also discovered three papal seals, […]

Are These the Bones of Santa Claus?

A new radio carbon analysis of a relic claimed to be part of St. Nicholas’ pelvis suggests the bone could possibly be authentic. Using a micro-sample of bone fragment originally held in Lyon, France, Professor Tom Higham and Dr Georges Kazan, the Directors of the Oxford Relics Cluster at Keble College’s Advanced Studies Centre, tested […]

Call for Papers: Omission – University of Oxford English Faculty Graduate Conference 2018

From lost or damaged Medieval manuscripts to censored modernist texts, omissions have marked and shaped our critical practices.

Researchers unlock the chemistry of Irish medieval manuscripts

Hidden away among the letters and words that cover the Gaelic manuscripts of the late middle ages is a world of minerals and chemical compounds. These chemicals have their own tales to tell about the craft and ingenuity of the scribes.

1,300 Hebrew manuscript now online in bilingual website

The British Library has launched its first ever fully bilingual web resource, providing free access to its spectacular collection of Hebrew manuscripts to researchers worldwide.

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Medieval Articles

Love Between Muslim and Jew in Medieval Spain: A Triangular Affair

Love Between Muslim and Jew in Medieval Spain: A Triangular Affair By David Nirenberg Jews, Muslims, and Christians in and around the Crown of Aragon: Essays in honour of Professor Elena Lourie, ed. Harvey J. Hames (Brill, 2004). Since the rise of Islam and until modern times, the great majority of interaction between Jew and Muslim […]

Marrying the Mongol Khans: Byzantine Imperial Women and the Diplomacy of Religious Conversion in the 13th and 14th Centuries

Marrying the Mongol Khans: Byzantine Imperial Women and the Diplomacy of Religious Conversion in the 13th and 14th Centuries By AnnaLinden Weller Scandanavian Journal of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies, Volume 2 (2016) Concerning this matter also a dread and authentic charge and ordinance of the great and holy Constantine is engraved upon the sacred table […]

History and Fiction in the Kings’ Sagas: The Case of Haraldr Harðráði

History and Fiction in the Kings’ Sagas: The Case of Haraldr Harðráði By Alison Finlay Saga-Book, Volume XXXIX, 2015 Haraldr harðráði was the other invader of England in 1066. If he had been as successful in his confrontation with the English king Harold Godwinsson at Stamford Bridge as he had been just five days earlier […]

The 1381 Rising in Bury St Edmunds: The Role of Leaders and the Community in Shaping the Rebellion

The 1381 Rising in Bury St Edmunds: The Role of Leaders and the Community in Shaping the Rebellion By Joe Chick PONS AELIUS: Newcastle University Postgraduate Forum E-Journal, Edition 13, 2016 Leadership is a central theme in popular perceptions of the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381. The image of the rebel leader Wat Tyler face-to-face with […]

The Economics of Guilds

The Economics of Guilds By Sheilagh Ogilvie Journal of Economic Perspectives,Volume 28, Number 4, 169–192 (2014) Occupational guilds have been observed for thousands of years in many economies: ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome; medieval and early modern India, Japan, Persia, Byzantium, and Europe; and nineteenth-century China, Latin America, and the Ottoman Empire. Guilds were most prevalent […]

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Medieval Videos

How to get a Nuremberg Chronicle’s Hairstyle

Janet Stephens’s tutorial for creating 15th century look on natural hair, using simple, period appropriate tools and techniques. Based on hairstyles of the Nuremberg Chronicle.

Take a look at the Luttrell Psalter

Watch Facsimile Finder’s video taking us through this fourteenth-century manuscript.

The Soul of Early Irish Monasticism

Not many people are aware that when it comes to Irish religious history, St Patrick only scratches the surface. The island in fact has a rich and fascinating Christian heritage, of which monks and sprawling monastic communities play a central role.

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Medieval Books

New Medieval Books: War, Politics and Beauty

From battles and wars to manuscripts and castles, here are five medieval books to explore.

New Medieval Books: Beowulf to da Vinci

Five new books to take you on a journey back into the Middle Ages.

New Medieval Books: From Manuscripts to Sutton Hoo

Five new books about the Middle Ages, going from Anglo-Saxon England to Fatimid Egypt.

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Medieval Movies & TV

10 Medieval Short Films

Need to have some medieval-themed binge viewing? Here are ten short films from Youtube and Vimeo that will take you back to the Middle Ages.

Medievalists at the Movies: King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword premiered May 2017 MAN CANDY ALERT! When I sat down to watch “King Arthur” over this past weekend, I was a bit apprehensive. This big-budget, big-name feature film didn’t last very long in theaters (never a good sign) and it received overall negative reviews (typically, not always, not a […]

Medievalists at the Movies: Assassin’s Creed

In between the exciting chases, hand-to-hand combat, and surprisingly well-acted dialogue, the overall film drags with too many flat moments of the lead actors staring into the camera or watching something happening from afar.

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More Medieval History

Making the Medieval Relevant: Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies on Disease and Disability

A summary of a paper given by Professor Christina Lee at the University of Nottingham’s “Making the Medieval Relevant” Conference.

Imprisonment, Execution and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum

The final talk in Sesson #1041, Engaging the Public with the Medieval World, looked at what English children are being taught in school. How much medieval history is in the new programme that was released in September 2014? Megan Gooch, Curator at the Historic Royal Palaces breaks down the English system for us in her paper, ‘Imprisonment, Execution, and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum’.

Making the Castle a Home: Creating an Immersive Medieval World Using Live Costumed Interpreters

How does the use of unscripted, adaptive, historical interpretation boost the tourist experience? Right on the heels of our look at the Tower of London’s visitor engagement, we heard a paper from Lauren Johnson, Research Manager for Past Pleasures, the oldest historical interpretation company in the UK who educate and entertain the public at historical sites, museums, on stage and and on TV.

‘But Where are the Dungeons?’: How to Engage the Public at the Tower of London

A talk about how historical sites, like the Tower of London engage the public. How to handle visitor expectations, what do people come t see and how to tell history in a captivating but accurate manner.

Kindred of the Sea – Young Adult Fiction series about the Vikings

These three novels in the series Kindred of the Sea, by C.J. Adrien, are aimed at a young adult/teen audience

Daughter of Destiny, by Nicole Evelina

Before queenship and Camelot, Guinevere was a priestess of Avalon. She loved another before Arthur, a warrior who would one day betray her.

The Last Kingdom: An Interview with Bernard Cornwell

What I find most compelling is the struggle to create a country which became England, a struggle that must have seemed hopeless at times and which roiled Britain in constant fighting. We think of England (especially) as a peaceful landscape, but in the 9th, 10th and 11th centuries it was horribly brutal and merciless.

1390 AD: London in the Late Middle Ages

Last week, we spoke with Dr. Matthew Green about his new History of London course. This week, we take a peek into the first lecture of the series, a ‘teaser’ on Medieval London in 1390.

Teaching Historical Theory through Video Games

The potential of video games for teaching history is receiving increasing recognition. However, the greatest emphasis is on their use as tools in secondary education. The few studies focusing on undergraduate education demonstrate the use of games to create an immersive historical experience with counterfactual options.

Minecraft and the Middle Ages

It is one of the most popular video games ever created. Moreover, educators are finding ways to use Minecraft as a teaching tool, and one that could be ideal for learning about the Middle Ages.

Gareth Hinds’ Beowulf

Dark and visceral, the graphic novel version of Beowulf created by Gareth Hinds is considered to be one of the most successful adaptations of the Old English tale.

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