• Ten Castles that Made Medieval Britain: Edinburgh Castle

    Few indeed are those architectural legacies still remaining to us that can boast the iconic status of Edinburgh Castle, its distinctive silhouette known throughout the world, accompanied by the gently wafting of bagpipes. Far rarer still are those structures with a comparably singular influence upon the shaping of a nation.

    Ten Castles that Made Medieval Britain: Edinburgh Castle
  • The Medieval Magazine – Issue 31

    This week’s issue of The Medieval Magazine takes a look at Christianity in the Middle Ages.

    The Medieval Magazine – Issue 31
  • Consider the Source

    I followed the link I was given and found a website that goes on and on about how brutal the medieval justice system was (with gory examples of limb-lopping and eyeball-gouging), and that people lived in fear of becoming the next victim of it. That’s when I started to get upset.

    Consider the Source
  • How Hagia Sophia was Built

    Stories and legends from the Patria on how the greatest church of the Byzantine world was built

    How Hagia Sophia was Built
  • Machiavelli and Botticelli Movies to Hit the Screen in 2016

    Machiavelli and Botticelli are set to hit screens in 2016. We sat down to chat with Italian director, Lorenzo Raveggi about his two ambitious projects.

    Machiavelli and Botticelli Movies to Hit the Screen in 2016
  • Which Historical Era Should You Time Travel To?

    Ever wonder when in time you should visit? Find out here!

    Which Historical Era Should You Time Travel To?
  • Ten Castles that Made Medieval Britain: Dunstanburgh Castle

    Few ambitions were ever so grand or manifestos so proudly proclaimed as those writ into the walls of Dunstanburgh Castle. The power of such fortifications wasn’t just limited to their considerable heft but was rooted in their role as the stronghold and home of the great men and women of the age

    Ten Castles that Made Medieval Britain: Dunstanburgh Castle

Medieval News

Map of Bannockburn showing the new archaeological find spots and the likeliest course of the battle over 23 and 24 June 1314. © Tony Pollard / GUARD Archaeology Ltd

Finding the Battle of Bannockburn

Between 2011 and 2014, a new search for the site of the Battle of Bannockburn took place, spurred on by the 700th anniversary of the battle and the National Trust for Scotland’s new state-of-the-art Bannockburn Battlefield Centre.

King Henry VIII (Nathan Wade) surveys the Tudor-feast inspired top table at Barley Hall, York. Photo courtesy  Jorvik Group

A Feast fit for a King at York

The JORVIK Group offer a time-travelling gastronomic treat during York’s Food and Drink Festival

Battle of Agincourt, depicted in A pictorial history of England (1854)

Free online course on the Battle of Agincourt begins in October

One of the leading experts on the famous Battle of Agincourt will be part of a free online course that begins on October 19th.

Edinburgh Castle with fireworks in 2011 - Photo by weir thru a lens / Flickr

Fireworks in Scotland date back to 1507, researchers find

Previously experts believed that fireworks were first used in Stirling in 1566, however, new evidence suggests that it was actually around 59 years earlier and in the Scottish capital. It is thought that ‘fireballs’ featured in a great tournament staged by King James lV, which took place at the base of Castle Rock, in 1507, in the area which is now the King’s Stables Road.

Photo by Asbjørn Svarstad /   Dagbladet News

13th century insult discovered etched into the walls of Nidaros Cathedral

LAURENSIUS CELVI ANUS PETRI / Lars is Peter’s butt.

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Medieval Articles

Sid Meier's Civilization IV

Teaching Historical Theory through Video Games

The potential of video games for teaching history is receiving increasing recognition. However, the greatest emphasis is on their use as tools in secondary education. The few studies focusing on undergraduate education demonstrate the use of games to create an immersive historical experience with counterfactual options.

fellowship of the ring

Simply Walking into Mordor: How Much Lembas Would The Fellowship Need?

The Fellowship of the Ring were supposed to travel from Imraldis to the forges of Mt. Doom in order to destroy the One Ring of Sauron.

This representation of Margaret of Anjou comes from Illuminations From the Books of the Skinners Company, AD 1422. It was entered in the roll of the fraternity of Our Lady in 1475.

Medieval Queens and Queenship: the Present Status of Research in Income and Power

This paper presents some thoughts and conclusions on the state of a multidisciplinary field of Medieval Studies, queens and queenship, concentrating mainly on issues of income and power.

Hrafnkels saga

Last Laughs: Torture in Medieval Icelandic Literature

Medieval Icelandic literature is full of violence, calculated and reasoned violence, narrated in such a way as to focus largely on issues of personal honor and justice, less so on the spectacle of blood so common in the modem Hollywood action film.

Yvain fighting Gawain. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion

Literature in an Apocalyptic Age; or, How to End a Romance

No literature of the Middle Ages has so successfully captured the imagination of recent times as has the medieval romance.

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Medieval Videos

Anglo Saxon House: A Reconstruction

Four videos from Woodlands.co.uk on how trees were used in the Middle Ages

The Newport Medieval Ship in Context: The Life and Times of a 15th Century Merchant Vessel Trading in Western Europe

This paper presents a summary of recent research into the broader economic, cultural and political world in which the Newport Medieval Ship was built and operated.

Between Subjects and Citizens: the Commons of England, c. 1300-1550

The political, social and cultural conditions of later medieval England fostered a situation in which ordinary people could have remarkable political agency.

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Medieval Books

The Arrow of Sherwood by Lauren Johnson

My book review of Robin Hood tale, Arrow of Sherwood by Lauren Johnson.

BOOK REVIEW: Genoa ‘La Superba’: The Rise and Fall of a Merchant Pirate Superpower by Nicholas Walton

While most books about Italy have been dedicated to tourist hubs like Milan, Florence, Rome, Sicily and Venice, Genoa with its rich history, rugged landscape, and tenacious residents, has been given only a passing mention.

BOOK REVIEW: The Tapestry by Nancy Bilyeau

Joanna Stafford, our intrepid ex-Dominican super sleuth is at it again. This time, she’s hurled straight into the midst of plotting and deception at Henry VIII’s court.

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Medieval Movies & TV

Secret Gestures and Silent Revelations: The Disclosure of Secrets in Selected Arthurian Illuminated Manuscripts and Arthurian Films

This paper explores visual language and iconic systems central to the representation of the Arthurian cycle in thirteenth and fifteenth century Gothic illuminated manuscripts and in two Arthurian films; its focus is the theme of courtly love and crucial revelations of the secret or hidden.

Movie Review: Dangerous Beauty

Late 16th century Venice, where a woman can be a nun, a wife or a courtesan. For Veronica Franco, the free spirited girl scorned by because of her lack of wealth, the choice is an obvious one…

Movie Review: Tristan and Isolde

As far as medieval movies go, Tristan and Isolde definitely isn’t the worst I’ve seen. I was looking for a movie to watch after work, and I thought, hey, James Franco, Sophia Moyles, Henry Cavill, and Rufus Sewell, all directed by Ridley Scott?! – this can’t be that bad. Well, it was pretty bad, but it wasn’t the worst 2 hours of my life. So what went wrong?

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More Medieval History

Cracking down on illegal gambling in Medieval Livonia

Just like their modern day counterparts, medieval cities had to deal with their own criminal underworlds – the sex trade, gambling, and violence taking place within their walls. At the International Medieval Congress, held earlier this month at the University of Leeds, these issues were explored as part of session #706: Perceiving and Regulating Vices.

Imprisonment, Execution and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum

The final talk in Sesson #1041, Engaging the Public with the Medieval World, looked at what English children are being taught in school. How much medieval history is in the new programme that was released in September 2014? Megan Gooch, Curator at the Historic Royal Palaces breaks down the English system for us in her paper, ‘Imprisonment, Execution, and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum’.

Making the Castle a Home: Creating an Immersive Medieval World Using Live Costumed Interpreters

How does the use of unscripted, adaptive, historical interpretation boost the tourist experience? Right on the heels of our look at the Tower of London’s visitor engagement, we heard a paper from Lauren Johnson, Research Manager for Past Pleasures, the oldest historical interpretation company in the UK who educate and entertain the public at historical sites, museums, on stage and and on TV.

‘But Where are the Dungeons?’: How to Engage the Public at the Tower of London

A talk about how historical sites, like the Tower of London engage the public. How to handle visitor expectations, what do people come t see and how to tell history in a captivating but accurate manner.

The Experience of Growing Up in Medieval Society

This session (#508) was one of several at Leeds devoted to exploring childhood in the Middle Ages. Our presenters talked about the stereotypes of adolescence, and what the coroner’s rolls revealed about the deaths (and lives) of medieval children.

The Archer’s Loss: England’s War, Fate’s Arrows

As England crumbles, so does Thomas as he rails against the world which has snatched life and love away from him so savagely. The end of the 116 year struggle between old foes shall be the making and breaking of a boy yet to develop into a man….

Book Review: The Iron King, by Maurice Druon

Touted by George R.R. Martin as the original Game of Thrones, Druon’s series has enjoyed a resurgence in popularity recently, and can be found in major bookstores.

What’s New in Medieval Historical Fiction

Learn more about these books: See the Sister Fidelma mysteries Wikipedia entry Visit Gear-Gear.com, website for the authors Kathleen O’Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear The Buried Giant review – Kazuo Ishiguro ventures into Tolkien territory – review by Tom Holland in The Guardian ‘The Invention of Fire’ is a thrillingly written 14th-century murder mystery […]

Teaching Historical Theory through Video Games

The potential of video games for teaching history is receiving increasing recognition. However, the greatest emphasis is on their use as tools in secondary education. The few studies focusing on undergraduate education demonstrate the use of games to create an immersive historical experience with counterfactual options.

Minecraft and the Middle Ages

It is one of the most popular video games ever created. Moreover, educators are finding ways to use Minecraft as a teaching tool, and one that could be ideal for learning about the Middle Ages.

Gareth Hinds’ Beowulf

Dark and visceral, the graphic novel version of Beowulf created by Gareth Hinds is considered to be one of the most successful adaptations of the Old English tale.

Using LEGO to teach the Middle Ages

Here are a few ideas that teachers can use to teach the Middle Ages with LEGO

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