• Did Medieval People Believe in King Arthur?

    By Danièle Cybulskie If you’ve ever had your doubts that King Arthur was a real, living, breathing human being at some point, you’re not alone. Despite the many, many histories that “prove” that Arthur was definitely this or that – tenacious Briton, Roman military man, leader of hunky Sarmatians – the evidence is pretty thin.… [Continue Reading]

    Did Medieval People Believe in King Arthur?
  • Becoming a Prince: Prince Arthur’s early life and his training to be king

    Within a month of his birth on 20 September 1486, Prince Arthur was separated from his family and living in a nursery at Farnham Palace in Surrey.

    Becoming a Prince: Prince Arthur’s early life and his training to be king
  • The Medieval Magazine (Volume 2, Issue 21)

    This issue looks at Point Rosee, The Battle of the Bastards, remedies for infertility, and much more! Inside this issue: About the Festival of Archaeology There’s a Lot of Dirt: How Archaeology Works How the Battle of the Bastards Squares with Medieval History Vikings Unearthed: A response to the Point Rosee Documentary Lady Arabella Stuart Medieval Tournament… [Continue Reading]

    The Medieval Magazine (Volume 2, Issue 21)
  • Anglo-Saxon Motte and Bailey Castle for Sale

    This Anglo-Saxon motte and bailey is located on a smallholding in the village of Ewyas Harold, Herefordshire and has recently been put on the market. It is of considerable interest because it was one of only three sites constructed prior to the Norman conquest.

    Anglo-Saxon Motte and Bailey Castle for Sale
  • Can you move in armour? An Experiment in Mythbusting

    In this video we have recreated the deeds of the famous knight Jean le Maingre, known as Boucicaut, which were put in writing in the early 15th century.

    Can you move in armour? An Experiment in Mythbusting
  • Medieval Mysteries: Miscellanies and Mix Tapes

    By Danièle Cybulskie In thinking this week about the medieval mysteries we’ll never solve, it struck me that one of the most fun questions that I – and everyone else who loves medieval books – ponder is why the particular stories in them are put together the way they are. Most medieval manuscripts that aren’t… [Continue Reading]

    Medieval Mysteries: Miscellanies and Mix Tapes
  • The Medieval Magazine (Volume 2 Issue 20)

    This issue looks at the hit musical Hamilton, medieval expressions of same-sex love in light of Pride, the anniversary of the Battle of Hastings, medieval “friend requests”, travel and much more!

    The Medieval Magazine (Volume 2 Issue 20)

Medieval News

Radimlja, one of the most valuable and most important necropolis of stećci in Bosnia and Herzegovina - Photo by Litany / Wikimedia Commons

Four medieval sites added to UNESCO’s World Heritage List

Medieval sites in Europe, Asia and the Pacific have been added to the World Heritage List this week, as part of UNESCO’s World Heritage Meetings, which have been taking place in Istanbul.

medieval warfare magazine 2016

Medieval Warfare Magazine – Volume 6 Issue 3

This summer you can read about the so-called ‘Last War of Antiquity’. The theme of the latest issue of Medieval Warfare is the Byzantine-Sassanid War of the seventh-century.

Call for Papers

Call for Papers: Medieval Studies on Television Screens

For the 27th Annual Conference of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association, Atlantic City, New Jersey, 3-5 November 2016

Mediterranean Castle for Sale

Mediterranean Castle for Sale

This 14th century castle can be found along the coast of Calabria in Italy.

Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem. (Wikipedia)

Crusaders, Pilgrims, and Relics – Bearers of the Cross: Material Religion in the Crusading World 1095-1300

The Museum of the Order of St. John is hosting a series of events and talks to promote their project: Bearers of the Cross: Material Religion in the Crusading World 1095-1300.

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Medieval Articles

Did Medieval People Believe in King Arthur?

By Danièle Cybulskie If you’ve ever had your doubts that King Arthur was a real, living, breathing human being at some point, you’re not alone. Despite the many, many histories that “prove” that Arthur was definitely this or that – tenacious Briton, Roman military man, leader of hunky Sarmatians – the evidence is pretty thin. […]

The Construction and Destruction of Troy, Orosius Master, Paris, 1405–6. In City of God

Constructing Imaginary Cities in Fifteenth-Century Illumination

In the course of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries the Trojan legend was one of the most popular myths in the European courts, and in the Burgundian court in particular. The legend was depicted in numerous tapestries and illuminated manuscripts.

From Bibliothèque Nationale MS Fr. 2663

The Black Prince at War: the anatomy of a Chevauchée

These were highly complex, organized, and focused operations rather than unfocused raids with no other purpose but pillage and ravishment.

medieval feast

A haunch for Hrothgar

Naomi Sykes takes a taste of venison amid the Feast Halls of Anglo-Saxon England

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The Varangian Legend: Testimony from the Old Norse sources

In the eleventh century there existed, within the great army of the Byzantine empire, a regiment composed mainly of soldiers from Scandinavia and the Nordic countries. This regiment was known as the Varangian Guard

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Medieval Videos

Tea and Other Decoctions for ‘Nourishing Life’ in Medieval China

Professor Benn examines one significant way in which tea, a relatively new beverage in Tang-dynasty China, was first consumed and understood, alongside other decoctions intended to promote health and wellness.

Negotiating the Sacred: Byzantium, Venice and the True Cross in Late Medieval Venice

Dr. Klein’s lecture about art, faith and politics in late medieval Venice.

Art as data: Studying corpses by drawing them

This paper addresses the potentials of treating art as data, drawing examples from my current research on corpse positioning in early Anglo-Saxon England.

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Medieval Books

Becoming a Prince: Prince Arthur’s early life and his training to be king

Within a month of his birth on 20 September 1486, Prince Arthur was separated from his family and living in a nursery at Farnham Palace in Surrey.

Soldiers of Christ: The Knights Hospitaller and the Knights Templar in medieval Ireland

In an Irish context, the Knights Hospitaller and the Knights Templar were the most significant expressions of this unusual vocation that sought to combine military service with monastic observance.

Isabella of France: The Rebel Queen

Read an excerpt from the new book by Kathryn Warner

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Medieval Movies & TV

Movie Review: Pope Joan – Medieval Legend Comes to Life Onscreen

Released in 2009, also under its German title, ,Die Päpstin,, ,Pope Joan’ recounts the medieval legend of Johanna von Ingleheim, a woman who disguised herself as a man, lived as a monk, and eventually went on to become pope in the ninth century.

The World’s Worst Fantasy Film: In the Name of the King

What do you get when you mix Burt Reynolds, Jason Statham, Ray Liotta and Ron Perlman in a movie together? You get a horrible movie. Those worlds are never meant to collide, and never in a fantasy movie.

Friendship, Betrayal, War: “Soldier of God” Movie Review

A Templar and a Muslim; their strange friendship is the premise of this week’s movie based in the 12th century immediately after the disastrous Battle of Hattin.

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More Medieval History

Making the Medieval Relevant: Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies on Disease and Disability

A summary of a paper given by Professor Christina Lee at the University of Nottingham’s “Making the Medieval Relevant” Conference.

Imprisonment, Execution and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum

The final talk in Sesson #1041, Engaging the Public with the Medieval World, looked at what English children are being taught in school. How much medieval history is in the new programme that was released in September 2014? Megan Gooch, Curator at the Historic Royal Palaces breaks down the English system for us in her paper, ‘Imprisonment, Execution, and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum’.

Making the Castle a Home: Creating an Immersive Medieval World Using Live Costumed Interpreters

How does the use of unscripted, adaptive, historical interpretation boost the tourist experience? Right on the heels of our look at the Tower of London’s visitor engagement, we heard a paper from Lauren Johnson, Research Manager for Past Pleasures, the oldest historical interpretation company in the UK who educate and entertain the public at historical sites, museums, on stage and and on TV.

‘But Where are the Dungeons?’: How to Engage the Public at the Tower of London

A talk about how historical sites, like the Tower of London engage the public. How to handle visitor expectations, what do people come t see and how to tell history in a captivating but accurate manner.

Kindred of the Sea – Young Adult Fiction series about the Vikings

These three novels in the series Kindred of the Sea, by C.J. Adrien, are aimed at a young adult/teen audience

Daughter of Destiny, by Nicole Evelina

Before queenship and Camelot, Guinevere was a priestess of Avalon. She loved another before Arthur, a warrior who would one day betray her.

The Last Kingdom: An Interview with Bernard Cornwell

What I find most compelling is the struggle to create a country which became England, a struggle that must have seemed hopeless at times and which roiled Britain in constant fighting. We think of England (especially) as a peaceful landscape, but in the 9th, 10th and 11th centuries it was horribly brutal and merciless.

Teaching Historical Theory through Video Games

The potential of video games for teaching history is receiving increasing recognition. However, the greatest emphasis is on their use as tools in secondary education. The few studies focusing on undergraduate education demonstrate the use of games to create an immersive historical experience with counterfactual options.

Minecraft and the Middle Ages

It is one of the most popular video games ever created. Moreover, educators are finding ways to use Minecraft as a teaching tool, and one that could be ideal for learning about the Middle Ages.

Gareth Hinds’ Beowulf

Dark and visceral, the graphic novel version of Beowulf created by Gareth Hinds is considered to be one of the most successful adaptations of the Old English tale.

Using LEGO to teach the Middle Ages

Here are a few ideas that teachers can use to teach the Middle Ages with LEGO

medievalverse magazine