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Medieval News

Video: Porpoise found in medieval graveyard

Here is the video of an interesting archaeological discovery on the island of Chapelle Dom Hue near Guernsey.

Animals came with medieval trade in Indian Ocean, researchers find

The earliest introduction of domestic chickens and black rats from Asia to the east coast of Africa came via maritime routes between the 7th and 8th centuries AD.

The First Zero

When did the mathematical zero begin being used? New research revealed this week by the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries shows that a manuscript from India bearing the symbol was written in the 3rd or 4th century, making it the world’s oldest recorded origin of the zero that we use today.

Archaeologists explore medieval manor linked with the Knights Hospitallers

University of Leicester archaeologists have returned this month to Castle Hill Country Park at Beaumont Leys to continue exploring a large scheduled ancient monument, Castle Hill, believed to be the remains of a medieval manorial site linked with the Knights Hospitallers. Last year, a two-week community dig on the site uncovered well-preserved medieval archaeology dating […]

The Vikings are coming to Toronto

The Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Toronto, Canada will be hosting the final stop of the North American tour of Vikings: The Exhibition. Beginning on November 4th, it draws on current archaeological scholarship and research, offering a fresh perspective on the Viking age that challenges some of the commonly held myths and perceptions about the […]

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Medieval Articles

The Hobbit and Other Fiction by J. R. R. Tolkien: Their Roots in Medieval Heroic Literature and Language

The body of this study presents the results of a survey of certain major medieval works in English, Norse, Irish, Welsh, French, German, and Italian, particularly those alluded to in Tolkien’s published scholarship and those suggested as possible sources in reviews of Tolkien’s fiction

A female Viking warrior confirmed by genomics

Already in the early middle ages, there were narratives about fierce female Vikings fighting alongside men. Although, continuously reoccurring in art as well as in poetry, the women warriors have generally been dismissed as mythological phenomena.

Matthias Corvinus and Charles the Bold

The paper investigates the diplomatic relations of Matthias Corvinus with the Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, focusing on the 1460s and ‘70s.

Why We Can’t Stop Fighting about Chaucer’s Man of Law

Why We Can’t Stop Fighting about Chaucer’s Man of Law By Bonnie J. Erwin Enarratio: Publications of the Medieval Association of the Midwest, Volume 20 (2016) Introduction: As Chaucer’s Canterbury pilgrims compete in their Host’s tale-telling challenge, they bicker and mock one another, form both alliances and rivalries, and critique one another’s religiosity, gender performance, and social […]

The Meaning of the Habit: Religious Orders, Dress and Identity, 1215-1650

What lies at the core of this analysis of the conceptions about religious clothing – used as a heuristic tool – is precisely its capacity to show not only how the identities of the religious orders of the period evolved, but also how they were perceived and conceived, and how they shaped these changes.

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Medieval Videos

Archaeological output in the museum setting: a case study – The Mary Rose

What is the ultimate output of this archaeological excavation? How are the results of the work communicated to a wider public in a way that is engaging for a 21st-century audience?

Recycled Fatimid State Documents from the Cairo Geniza

Among the many unexpected finds the Cairo Geniza has yielded are hundreds—possibly thousands—of medieval documents of state in Arabic script, including decrees, rescripts, petitions, tax receipts and fiscal accounts from the Fatimid period.

Fabriano: City of Medieval & Renaissance Papermaking

Sylvia Rodgers Albro detailed technical advancements introduced in the Italian city of Fabriano, including machinery and equipment, use of watermarks and improvements in the physical processes of papermaking.

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Medieval Books

New Medieval Books: People and Places

Five books published in 2017 that could be on the shelf of any medievalist.

New Medieval Books: From England’s King (without a kingdom) to the Byzantine Astronomer

Five new books about the Middle Ages.

Book Tour: The House of Beaufort by Nathen Amin

We’re excited to host Nathen Amin’s book tour today on Medievalists.net. We’re pleased to feature an excerpt for you to enjoy before you get your hands on this fascinating book!

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Medieval Movies & TV

Medievalists at the Movies: King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword premiered May 2017 MAN CANDY ALERT! When I sat down to watch “King Arthur” over this past weekend, I was a bit apprehensive. This big-budget, big-name feature film didn’t last very long in theaters (never a good sign) and it received overall negative reviews (typically, not always, not a […]

Medievalists at the Movies: Assassin’s Creed

In between the exciting chases, hand-to-hand combat, and surprisingly well-acted dialogue, the overall film drags with too many flat moments of the lead actors staring into the camera or watching something happening from afar.

Get ready for medieval zombies on film!

Horror just got medieval! An Australian filmmaker is set to expand a short film about crusaders fighting zombies, hoping to create a web series. A fundraising campaign is now underway to give Black Crusade the chance to unleash its undead horde.

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More Medieval History

Making the Medieval Relevant: Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies on Disease and Disability

A summary of a paper given by Professor Christina Lee at the University of Nottingham’s “Making the Medieval Relevant” Conference.

Imprisonment, Execution and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum

The final talk in Sesson #1041, Engaging the Public with the Medieval World, looked at what English children are being taught in school. How much medieval history is in the new programme that was released in September 2014? Megan Gooch, Curator at the Historic Royal Palaces breaks down the English system for us in her paper, ‘Imprisonment, Execution, and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum’.

Making the Castle a Home: Creating an Immersive Medieval World Using Live Costumed Interpreters

How does the use of unscripted, adaptive, historical interpretation boost the tourist experience? Right on the heels of our look at the Tower of London’s visitor engagement, we heard a paper from Lauren Johnson, Research Manager for Past Pleasures, the oldest historical interpretation company in the UK who educate and entertain the public at historical sites, museums, on stage and and on TV.

‘But Where are the Dungeons?’: How to Engage the Public at the Tower of London

A talk about how historical sites, like the Tower of London engage the public. How to handle visitor expectations, what do people come t see and how to tell history in a captivating but accurate manner.

Kindred of the Sea – Young Adult Fiction series about the Vikings

These three novels in the series Kindred of the Sea, by C.J. Adrien, are aimed at a young adult/teen audience

Daughter of Destiny, by Nicole Evelina

Before queenship and Camelot, Guinevere was a priestess of Avalon. She loved another before Arthur, a warrior who would one day betray her.

The Last Kingdom: An Interview with Bernard Cornwell

What I find most compelling is the struggle to create a country which became England, a struggle that must have seemed hopeless at times and which roiled Britain in constant fighting. We think of England (especially) as a peaceful landscape, but in the 9th, 10th and 11th centuries it was horribly brutal and merciless.

1390 AD: London in the Late Middle Ages

Last week, we spoke with Dr. Matthew Green about his new History of London course. This week, we take a peek into the first lecture of the series, a ‘teaser’ on Medieval London in 1390.

Teaching Historical Theory through Video Games

The potential of video games for teaching history is receiving increasing recognition. However, the greatest emphasis is on their use as tools in secondary education. The few studies focusing on undergraduate education demonstrate the use of games to create an immersive historical experience with counterfactual options.

Minecraft and the Middle Ages

It is one of the most popular video games ever created. Moreover, educators are finding ways to use Minecraft as a teaching tool, and one that could be ideal for learning about the Middle Ages.

Gareth Hinds’ Beowulf

Dark and visceral, the graphic novel version of Beowulf created by Gareth Hinds is considered to be one of the most successful adaptations of the Old English tale.

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