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The Cloisters reopens in New York City

Fans of medieval art have another place they can once again explore, as The Cloisters has re-opened to the public. Based in New York City, The Cloisters is part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Located in Fort Tryon Park in northern Manhattan features the art and architecture of medieval Europe. It will be open Thursday to Monday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through October (10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. November through February), and will be closed on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

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Entry to the Museum is available by timed ticket or reservation. In order to observe social distancing at The Cloisters, there will be a one-way route through the galleries, and the West Terrace will be temporarily closed. Visitors will find paintings, illuminated manuscripts, tapestries, sculptures, and other treasures from medieval Europe, including the seven monumental Unicorn Tapestries and the famed Early Netherlandish masterpiece the Merode Altarpiece. Inside the Medieval Treasury, the Prato Haggadah (on loan from The Library of the Jewish Theological Seminary) is opened to a richly ornamented page appropriate both to Passover and Sukkot, the Jewish harvest festival. In the same gallery, The Belles Heures of Jean de Berry and The Cloisters Apocalypse are opened to pages in which the subject matter is confronting the sober reality of plague.

The main building of the The Metropolitan Museum of Art, also known as The Met, had already reopened in late August after being closed for six months because of the COVID-19 pandemic. “After nearly six months, The Met’s reopening will be a historic moment for the Museum and the City,” said Daniel H. Weiss, President and CEO of The Met. “Throughout the recent months of uncertainty, isolation and grief, we have longed for the day when we can safely welcome everyone back to The Met, where all can find comfort, inspiration, and a sense of community. To see visitors walk through the doors of the Museum once again will be a very powerful experience.”

Click here to get more information about The Cloisters and to buy tickets

Top Image: The MET Cloisters – Metropolitan Museum of Art – photo by Joy of Museums / Wikimedia Commons

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