A Created Enemy: ‘Barbarians’ in spite of Religious Conversion. Visigoths and Byzantines in 6th-Century Iberia

Capital from the Visigothic church of San Pedro de la Nave.

This study approaches the concept of resistance as a tool for historical analysis during Roman Late Antiquity, especially with respect to the identity construction and the creation of physical or mental borders between Byzantines and Barbarians.

Christianity and the Latin tradition in early Medieval Ireland

Book of Ballymote - explaining Ogham script

The Christianity which arrived in Ireland with the fifth-century missionaries was more than just a literate religion; it was very much a religion of the book.

Making a difference in tenth-century politics: King Athelstan’s sisters and Frankish queenship

Eadgifu of England/Wessex

In the early years of the tenth century several Anglo-Saxon royal women, all daughters of King Edward the Elder of Wessex (899-924) and sisters (or half-sisters) of his son King Athelstan (924-39), were despatched across the Channel as brides for Frankish and Saxon rulers and aristocrats. This article addresses the fate of some of these women through an analysis of their political identities.

‘Waiting Only for a Pretext’: A New Chronology for the Sixth-Century Byzantine Invasion of Spain

Justinian

This article argues that the common modern version of the invasion, in which Byzantine forces arrived in 552, fought on the side of the usurper Athanagild until 555, and then fought against Athanagild for a brief period before concluding a treaty with him, is flawed and, relying on a more precise reading of the sources, proposes a new chronology and narrative, in which Byzantine forces did not arrive until 554.

Totila: Theoderic Reborn or Barbarian Belisarius?

Portrait of Totila by Francesco Salviati (16th c)

This essay examines the sixth-century Byzantine historian Procopius’ depiction of the Gothic king Totila.

The Price of Alfonso’s Wisdom. Nationalist Translation Policy in Thirteenth-Century Castile

Alfonso X of Castile

First, how can we say where and when translation began in any country? The origins of translation are surely to be associated with the first evidence of trade, and trade was certainly carried out in the Spain of the Romans, the Visigoths, and of course the centuries of Islamic domination.

Constantius and the Visigothic Settlement in Gaul

Visigothic crown

The emperor Honorius made an attempt during his reign to calm the turbulent region of Gaul by assigning one of his generals to the area and appointing him as the head of the regions armies.

The Difference A King Makes: Religion And National Unity In Spain

Visigothic Spain

It is the end of the Roman period, however, that interests us most. What happened then is a model for the relationship between Church and state that has had an enduring and powerful influence.

The Monastic rules of Visigothic Iberia: a study of their text and language

Monk writing

Studies on early medieval monasticism have gained ground in recent scholarship.1 However, despite earlier activity,2 interest in early western monastic rules has generally lagged behind.

The continuity of Roman water supply systems in post-Roman Spain: the case of Valentia, a reliable example?

Roman Aqua Ducts

This paper will thus be structured in several sections. First it will be necessary to approach the topic of Roman water supply systems as a whole, their direct relationship with urbanism and city-dwellers, and how these monuments were a clear indicator of Romanitas, even in the post-Roman period.

On the Language of Conversion: Visigothic Spain Revisited

Visigothic Spain

In fifth-century Spain, the Visigoth conquerors – Christians and Arians – had to live with the native Hispani, who were Roman by culture and law and Catholic by faith.

Byzantines, Goths and Lombards in Italy: Jewellery, Dress and Cultural Interactions

Visigothic crown

The temptation is naturally to seek differences or contrasts from one power to another, to reinforce the conflict and tension identified in contemporary historians.

Visigoths and Romans: Integration and Ethnicity

Medallion of Galla Placidia, Ravenna, 425

The year was 414 and Galla Placidia, Roman princess and half-sister of Honorius, emperor of the Western Empire, sat next to Athaulf, barbarian king of the Visigoths

The role of the nobility in the creation of Gallo-Frankish society in the late fifth and sixth centuries AD

Frankish Psalter

The role of the nobility in the creation of Gallo-Frankish society in the late fifth and sixth centuries AD Wood, Catrin Mair Lewis PhD Thesis, University of Nottingham (2002) Abstract The aim of this dissertation is to explore the contribution made by the nobility, both Gallo-Roman and Frankish, to the creation of a new society after […]

Germanic Women: Mundium and Property, 400-1000

Merovingian woman

Germanic Women: Mundium and Property, 400-1000 Dunn, Kimberlee Harper (University of North Texas) M.A. Thesis (Science), University of North Texas, August (2006) Abstract Many historians would like to discover a time of relative freedom, security and independence for women of the past. The Germanic era, from 400-1000 AD, was a time of stability, and security […]

Jews as pagans? Polemical definitions of identity in Visigothic Spain

19th century depiction of Jews

Jews as pagans? Polemical definitions of identity in Visigothic Spain By Wolfram Drews Early Medieval Europe, Volume 11, Issue 3 (2002) Abstract: A conciliar canon from Visigothic Spain relates that Jewish parents, who had been baptized by force, were trying to save their children from baptism, relying on the help of Christian neighbours, who lent […]

Hispanic Hebrew Poetry: a Bridge between the Bible and Medieval

Medieval Hebrew poetry

Hispanic Hebrew Poetry: a Bridge between the Bible and Medieval Iberian Literatures Doron, Aviva (University of Haifa) eHumanista: Volume 14, (2010) Abstract While literature tends to reflect historic, religious and social processes, intercultural contacts are reflected mainly in the works of poets from minority groups, as they speak the languages of their environment and are […]

Towards Modernity and Absolute Power: Interpretation of Kingship in

Fernando III of Castile

Towards Modernity and Absolute Power: Interpretation of Kingship in The Book of the Twelve Wise Men and The Seven Books of Law McLean, Benjamin Transcultural Studies: A Series in Interdisciplinary Research,Volumes 2-3 (2006-7) Abstract In Castile (Spain) of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, one finds signs of a vigorous debate on the nature and limits […]

The Chronica Maiora of Isidore of Seville: An introduction and translation

Statue of Isidore of Seville by José Alcoverro, outside of the Biblioteca Nacional de España, in Madrid. Photo by Luis García

The Chronica Maiora of Isidore of Seville: An introduction and translation By Jamie Wood and Sam Koon e-Spania, Vol.6 (2008) Abstract: Isidore of Seville’s Chronica Maiora was written in two redactions in early seventh century and reveals a great deal about the political, religious and intellectual history of late antique and early medieval Spain. A […]

HISPANISMS IN THE LANGUAGE OF ISIDORE OF SEVILLE

Isidore of Seville

HISPANISMS IN THE LANGUAGE OF ISIDORE OF SEVILLE Maltby, Robert Hispania terris omnibus felicior: Premesse ed esiti di un processo di integrazione, Pisa (2001) Abstract For the student of late Latin in Spain Isidore of Seville (560-636 AD) is a very important figure, as he is writing at a time when the Latin of the […]

Between Arles, Rome, and Toledo: Gallic collections of canon law in Late Antiquity

Orleans - photo by Kamel15

Between Arles, Rome, and Toledo: Gallic collections of canon law ¡n Late Antiquity By Ralph W. Mathisen Fronteras Religiosas entre Roma, Bizancio, Damasco y Toledo. El Nacimiento de Europa y del Islam (Siglos V-VIII), edited by S. Montero (Madrid, 1999) Introduction: Late Antiquity, and the sixth century in particular, was the great age of church […]

Reasons for Political Instability in the Visigothic Kingdom in Iberia

Visigoths

Reasons for Political Instability in the Visigothic Kingdom in Iberia Bourassa, Gillian Washington College Review, Vol.15 (2007) Abstract Europe experienced significant changes during the fourth and fifth centuries of the Common Era, as the Roman Empire declined and several new kingdoms rose to prominence in the West as a result of the migrations of various Germanic […]

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