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Crusaders, Pilgrims, and Relics – Bearers of the Cross: Material Religion in the Crusading World 1095-1300

The Museum of the Order of St. John is hosting a series of events and talks to promote their project: Bearers of the Cross: Material Religion in the Crusading World 1095-1300.

The Medieval Story of Jesus’ Prison Cell

Today it is one of the quieter corners of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, but hundreds of years ago the ‘Prison of Christ’ was one of the must-see spots for medieval Christian pilgrims.

The Global Side of Medieval at the Getty Centre: Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts

Los Angeles correspondent, Danielle Trynoski takes through the, ‘Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts’ exhibut at the Getty Museum.

Friendship, Betrayal, War: “Soldier of God” Movie Review

A Templar and a Muslim; their strange friendship is the premise of this week’s movie based in the 12th century immediately after the disastrous Battle of Hattin.

The Church as a Woman: The Gendered Rhetoric of the Feminine Divine

This study investigates just a small aspect of the subject, namely Hildegard’s use of gendered rhetoric in her portrayal of the personified church.

Epiphany: Three Kings Day

A look at the history behind Epiphany and Twelfth Night.

Care of relics in early medieval Rome

Hidden in a dark corner of St. Peter’s shrine, Pope Sergius I (687–701) found a silver box so blackened with age that he was at first unsure whether it was indeed made of silver.

The Story of Exodus: The Anglo-Saxon Version

The clever authors of these Anglo-Saxon biblical poems knew their audiences, engaging readers and listeners by retelling Old Testament stories in an epic way that was both familiar and beloved.

Advent in the Middle Ages

Advent in the Middle Ages

Walk this Way: Two Journeys to Jerusalem in the Fifteenth Century

This paper appraises place pilgrimage to Jerusalem in two late-medieval English texts: The Itineraries of William Wey and The Book of Margery Kempe.

Ring Out the Old: Medieval Bells in England

Of the bells that survive, the oldest may be in St. Chad’s Church in Claughton in Lancashire.

Sacrificial Magic and the Twofold Division of the Irish Ritual Year

The historical development of St. Martin’s Day in Ireland, and its relationship with the more ancient festival of Samhain is examined, revealing circumstances that saw much of the ritual nature of Samhain being adopted within a Christian context in the medieval period.

The End of the Ancient Other World: Death and Afterlife between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages

Peter Brown gives lectures on ‘Gloriosus Obitus: Death and Afterlife 400-700 AD’ and ‘The Decline of the Empire of God: From Amnesty to Purgatory’

Necromancy from Antiquity to Medieval and Modern Times

In the Old Norse saga there is peculiar technique of divination called utiseta that is practised on burial mounds.

Priests found spiritual satisfaction by serving nuns, Stanford medieval historian says

A study of medieval texts and imagery by Stanford history Professor Fiona Griffiths counters commonly held beliefs about misogynistic practices in medieval Europe. Griffiths’ research reveals how some male clergy acknowledged and celebrated the perceived religious superiority of nuns.

Kissing Heaven’s Door: the Medieval Legend of Judas Iscariot

When we consider Judas Iscariot as he appears in the Bible in modern terms, we might think along the lines of a pantomime villain.

Demon Possession in Anglo‐Saxon and Early Modern England: Continuity and Evolution in Social Context

Sometime between around 687 and 700, a distraught father brought his raving son, in a wagon, to the island of Lindisfarne, where the holy relics of Saint Cuthbert were kept.

Medieval Pilgrimages: It’s All About the Journey

For medieval people, faith was more than just an abstract idea, it was tangible in the works they made to glorify God, and the relics they could see with their own eyes. An integral part of this tangible form of faith was the pilgrimage: a spiritual journey to visit a holy site.

How to destroy gods

In the year 1168 a Danish bishop destroyed three pagan gods. The story is told in Gesta Danorum, by Saxo Grammaticus, which has recently been entirely translated into English for the first time.

What is a Psalter?

Because they didn’t contain the entire Bible, psalters were nice and portable, making good girdle books for the devout – or those concerned with showing off – to carry with them.

Portable Christianity: Relics in the Medieval West (c.700–1200)

Relics thus typify the characteristic dynamic of medieval Christianity—a repeated refreshing and renewing of an ancient tradition that was endlessly culturally creative.

Can We Talk About Religion, Please? Medievalism’s Eschewal of Religion, and Why it Matters

With this essai I would like to advocate for a reconsideration of religion as an essential topic for medievalism studies.

Performing the Seven Deadly Sins: How One Late-Medieval English Preacher did it

Some preachers, it is true, shunned certain of the rhetorical embellishments characteristically recommended in the artes predicandi.

Medieval Jews on Christianity

Whatever medieval Jews said, or thought, about Christianity, one may be sure that very little of it was good.

Margery Kempe and her Autobiography

Margery Kempe was a self-proclaimed holy woman, visionary, mystic and medieval pilgrim. She is also unique because although she was not proficient at reading and writing, she was determined to record her visions, journeys and spiritual experiences

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