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The Medieval Magazine: (Volume 4: No. 2): Issue 104: Winter 2018

Banish the January doldrums with our latest issue featuring Sirens, the Bayeux Tapestry, Joan of Arc, and a trip to Ireland.

The Miracle of the Unspilled Beer

Was not spilling beer important enough to be considered a miracle? For one seventh-century writer it was!

“God Sends Meate but the Devill Sends Cookes”: Cooks Working in French and English Great Households, c.1350-c.1650

This dissertation analyzes newly uncovered archival data and printed primary-source material related to French and English cooks employed in great households between 1350 and 1650.

Medieval European Medicine and Asian Spices

This article aimed to explain the reasons why Asian spices including pepper, ginger, and cinnamon were considered as special and valuable drugs with curative powers in the Medieval Europe.

Beekeeping from Antiquity Through the Middle Ages

Beekeeping from Antiquity Through the Middle Ages By Gene Kritsky Annual Review of Entomology, 2017. 62:249–64 Humans and honey bees have a long history of association. It is likely that proto-humans were interacting with honey bees long before the appearance of Homo sapiens, as chimpanzees will modify branches into a variety of tools to tear into […]

Nutrition and the Early-Medieval Diet

The food supply of the temperate lands of early-medieval western Europe, and the ways in which its peoples dealt with the central problem of feeding themselves, has been subjected to a variety of interpretations in recent years.

Medieval Manuscripts: Bread in the 15th-century

The manuscript ‘Tacuinum Sanitatis’ shows modern readers how medieval bakers prepared bread.

What to eat in (and at) Medieval Times

If the Renfair people can get this right, how does the Medieval Times menu perform?

The Delectable War between Mutton and the Refreshments of the Market-Place: Rereading the Curious Tale of the Mamluk Era

At some point in XV century, Ahmad Ibn Yahya Ibn Hasan al-Haggar composed a curious narrative titled ‘Kitab al-harb alma suq bayna lahm ad-da’n wa-hawadir as-suq’ (‘The Delectable War between Mutton and the Refreshments of the Market-Place’).

Medical and Dietetic References in Medieval German Cookbooks

Medical and Dietetic References in Medieval German Cookbooks By Marialuisa Caparrini I castelli di Yale online, Vol.5:1 (2017) Abstract: This article aims at describing the various types of medical remarks which are included in late medieval German cookbooks. The examples show that these suggestions, generally very short, reflect the common medical theories on nutrition and […]

The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, No. 14) : Historic Selfies!

In this issue: Historic selfies with the medieval kings of France, and in Renaissance coins, the Anglo-Saxon fenlands, and how DNA research on chickens is linked to medieval diet and fasting traditions. We visit Anne Boleyn’s childhood home and look at the Holy Spirit in female form.

Brewing Viking beer — with stones

There’s nothing archaeologists like better than piles of centuries-old rubbish. Ancient bones and stones from trash heaps can tell complex stories. And in central Norway, at least, the story seems to be that Vikings and their descendants brewed beer by tossing hot rocks into wooden kettles

The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, Issue 8) : Mother’s Day Issue

In our latest issue: Celebrating Mother’s Day. Mothers Who Weren’t: Wet Nurses in the Late Medieval Mediterranean
Motherly advice from the ninth century, Sex in the Roman Empire: In Bed with the Romans! Feast, Famine, and Food in Medieval Russia, Books: A trip through Welsh past in Mysterious Wales and much, much more!

Fish on Friday III: From Fish Weir to Table

It’s no mystery that medieval people ate fish. The fish industry was a vital element of the medieval European economy, and fueled lots of movement around the continent. However how did they get onto the trestle tables and trenchers?

Fish on Friday II: Monastic Meals

In the Middle Ages, fasting and Lenten traditions were highly evident in the monastic houses. The different Rules and Orders (take your pick from Benedictine, Carthusian, Cluniac, Cistercian, Premonstratensians, Trinitarians, Beguines, and more!) had strict rules governing their lifestyles, including their diet, nutrition, and meals. Where, When, What, and How Much? Monastic communities ate their […]

Fish on Friday I: Economic Blessing or Dietary Sacrifice?

A lack of red meat on the medieval table meant the diners were having a humble meal, and fish was a convenient substitute protein.

Old Food was Never Better: Augmenting event authenticity at a medieval festival

Initially, an exploratory ethnographic study was conducted at a pre-festival medieval banquet to explore dimensions of food and beverage apparent in the literature. This informed a resultant survey which was administered at the festival tournament.

Nothing Lovelier than Spring (Gardening) in Paris

Wondering what to plant in your garden this year? Take some advice from an elderly gentleman living in a big city!

Tea Perceived: From a 9th-Century Shipwreck to a 19th-Century Snuff Bottle

The growth of tea as a beverage in China began under the influence of Buddhism during the medieval period and then was legitimized among the population at large through the efforts of Lu Yu (733-804)

BOOK REVIEW: A Year in the Life of Medieval England by Toni Mount

Author Toni Mount is back again, but this time with an in-depth look at daily life in Medieval England. Her book, A Year in the Life of Medieval England, explores war, medicine, marriage, disputes, work, and cooking. A fascinating almanac of bits and bobs about Medieval England from the most most mundane, to the most important events in its history.

Places to See: London in 7 Drinks

Can you tell history through a pint? Or a cup of coffee perhaps? According to Dr. Matthew Green you can. The historian and author turned his passion for history into Unreal City Audio: London Walking Tours.

Tea and Other Decoctions for ‘Nourishing Life’ in Medieval China

Professor Benn examines one significant way in which tea, a relatively new beverage in Tang-dynasty China, was first consumed and understood, alongside other decoctions intended to promote health and wellness.

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