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The Medieval Magazine: (Volume 3: No. 18): Issue 101: Reformation 500

In this issue: 80+ pages of news, books, articles, exhibits, and events, with a focus on the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation!

“A New kind of monster … part-monk, part-knight”: the paradox of clerical militarism in the Middle Ages

The interaction between clerics and warfare was a source of constant tension, debate, and conflict in the Middle Ages.

An Ethiopian Monk And A Dominican Friar Walk Into A Bar

In 1237, during the brief sequel of Latin rule, one Ethiopian monk decided to work this system to his—and his kingdom’s—advantage.

Judicial Inquiry as an Instrument of Centralized Government: The Papacy’s Criminal Proceedings against Prelates in the Age of Theocracy (Mid-Twelfth to Mid-Fourteenth Century)

From the end of the twelfth century until the Great Schism, the papacy prosecuted hundreds of prelates who were charged with ‘crimes’ (crimina), ‘excesses’ (excessus), or ‘enormities’ (enormia, enormitates), these words being used interchangeably in the documents.

St Columba’s cell revealed by archaeologists

This discovery is massive. St Columba is a key figure in Western Christendom. He was the national patron saint of Scotland in the Middle Ages.

The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, No. 12) : Medieval Nation

In this issue we tackle National Holidays and the development of Nations, manuscripts at the Getty, and look at courtly festivities and jousting in London. We’re also baking bread Viking style, taking a trip to Avignon, and joining the medieval navy!

The Prior, the Prioress, and the Kidnappers

Monks were deserting their pastoral posts and in some cases their vows altogether; nuns were having covert affairs with local men and—worse—getting caught.

Medieval Sources of Sovereignty: The Idea of Supreme Authority in Quanto Personam and its Glosses

Pope Innocent III’s decretal Quanto personam, issued on 21 August 1198, makes a number of claims regarding the locus, source and character of supreme authority within the Church.

Roman Singing and its Influence Across Europe

In this lecture we shall explore what the singing of Rome meant far afield: in northern England, Ireland, Spain and Germany.

Priest as Criminal: Community Regulation of Priests in the Archdeaconry of Paris, 1483-1505

This dissertation examines accusations of criminal behavior levied against priests in the archdeaconry of Paris from 1483 – 1505.

A Revolutionary Reform: How William the Conqueror Conquered the Church

The aspect of William’s rule that this work is primarily focused on is his effect on the church. The changes to the church in England can only be described as revolutionary.

Medieval English Embroidery on Display for the Last Time at the V&A’s Opus Anglicanum Exhibit

The V&A Museum opened its latest medieval exhibit exhibit on Saturday: Opus Anglicanum: Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery. I had the opportunity to see it opening day and it was spectacular.

Plague, Papacy and Power: The Effect of the Black Plague on the Avignon Papacy

The plague came at a critical moment for the Church, and the papacy at Avignon did not adequately rise to the challenge.

A Clergyman out of Control: Portrait of a Bishop Around the Year 1000

The following example describes Bishop Megingaud of Eichstaett (991–1014/1015) who was anything but holy.

Movie Review: Pope Joan – Medieval Legend Comes to Life Onscreen

Released in 2009, also under its German title, ,Die Päpstin,, ,Pope Joan’ recounts the medieval legend of Johanna von Ingleheim, a woman who disguised herself as a man, lived as a monk, and eventually went on to become pope in the ninth century.

Celebrating the New Year, Medieval Style

A look at New Year’s in the Middle Ages.

Advent in the Middle Ages

Advent in the Middle Ages

The Anglo-Saxon Age: The Birth of England

Martin Wall takes us on a journey into a period that still remains mysterious, into regions and countries long forgotten, such as Mercia and Northumbria.

Rival bishops, rival cathedrals: the election of Cormac, archdeacon of Sodor, as bishop in 1331

In the early fourteenth century, the diocese of Sodor, or Sudreyjar meaning Southern Isles in old Norse, encompassed the Isle of Man and the Hebrides.

How Christianity came to Europe

During the Middle Ages nearly all the lands of Europe converted to Christianity. In this short guide, we take a look at how various lands adopted Christianity, including by means of missionary efforts, politics and warfare.

Magna Carta Conference Offers New Insights Into The 800-year-old Document

Magna Carta just celebrated its 800th birthday this past Monday. In honour of this incredible milestone, King’s College London, and the Magna Carta Project, hosted a 3 day conference dedicated to this historic document.

Game of Thrones – East and West, Constantinople and Rome, Emperor and Bishop

The following is a tale of the struggle between the Emperors of Constantinople and the the Bishops of Rome

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