Advertisement

Nalbinding for Beginners

Nalbinding is the Viking-Age term for single-needle knitting. A traditional wool craft that would be used to make woollen hats, socks, gloves and mittens.

Delapré Abbey opens its doors to reveal 900 years of history

After an extensive programme of National Lottery funded restoration, Delapré Abbey in Northamptonshire is set to open to the public from March 17th 2018.

High-tech scans reveal secrets of medieval burial stones in Scotland

The latest digital photography techniques applied to the ancient burial stones at Inchinnan Parish Church in western Scotland have revealed that one of the stones, thought to be medieval in date, was originally carved much earlier..

Byzantine fountain and pools discovered in Israel

Archaeological Excavations in Ein Hanniya Park in Rephaim Valley National Park, Israel, have uncovered impressive and significant finds, including pools and an elaborate fountain dating back 1500 years, a capital typical of First Temple-era royal estates, and a rare silver coin.

Mass grave maybe from the Viking Great Army, archaeologists find

A team of archaeologists has discovered that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead.

Researchers find first evidence of glassmaking in sub-Saharan Africa

Scholars from Rice University, University College London and the Field Museum have found the first direct evidence that glass was produced in sub-Saharan Africa centuries before the arrival of Europeans.

Medieval Chess Piece Discovered in Norway

Archaeologists recently made a particularly spectacular find in Tønsberg – a rare and richly decorated chess piece.

How Dice Changed in the Middle Ages

Whether at a casino playing craps or engaging with family in a simple board game at home, rolling the dice introduces a bit of chance or “luck” into every game.

Using AI to uncover the mystery of the Voynich manuscript

Modern scientific methods help decipher language and meaning of medieval manuscript.

Exhibition of Medieval Manuscripts Opening at the Art Institute of Chicago

From January 27-May 28, 2018, the Art Institute of Chicago will present a collection of manuscript illuminations spanning four hundred years of the Middle Ages and early Renaissance from countries across Western Europe.

Modern mathematics is used to solve question about medieval war

In the year 1014, the fate of Ireland would be decided at the Battle of Clontarf. The Irish King Brian Boru would defeat a Viking army, although at the cost of his own life. However, there is one historical debate about this conflict – was it really a battle against the Vikings, or an internal civil war?

Outcasts: Prejudice and Persecution in the Medieval World comes to the Getty

Outcasts: Prejudice & Persecution in the Medieval World, on view January 30—April 8, 2018 at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center, presents individual case studies that examine the way art, like language, was used to articulate a rhetoric of exclusion.

Now and Forever: The Art of Medieval Time – new exhibition comes to the Morgan Library

Drawing upon the rich holdings of the Morgan Library & Museum’s collection of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, Now and Forever explores how people told time in the Middle Ages and what they thought about it.

Is the Bayeux Tapestry coming to Britain?

Reports suggest the Bayeux Tapestry – one of the most famous pieces of medieval art – will be loaned to the British Museum for several months.

York Minster’s Great East Window restoration completed

On 2 January 2018, the final panel in York Minster’s 600-year-old Great East Window was returned to the world-famous masterpiece, 10 years after all 311 panels were removed by York Glaziers Trust.

Research into Anglo-Saxon burials uncover new insights

Christine Cave, a PhD candidate at the Austrialian National University, has developed a new method for determining the age-of-death for skeletal remains based on how worn the teeth are.

Canterbury Roll now available online

In New Zealand, University of Canterbury staff and students are working to translate and digitise a unique medieval manuscript to make it accessible to the world.

Medieval friary where Richard III was buried to be protected

The remains of a 13th century monastic site, Greyfriars in Leicester, which was the burial place of King Richard III, has been granted protection by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on the advice of Historic England.

Ruins of 8th century monument discovered in Mongolia

A joint excavation team from Osaka University and the Institute of History and Archaeology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences discovered the ruins of a unique monument surrounded by 14 large stone pillars with Turkic Runic inscriptions.

How the Pope’s rhino drowned and was immortalised in art history

The story of one of the most infamous gifts, and one of the most influential images in art history, has been brought back to life thanks to research at the University of Warwick.

Restoration work begins on 15th century altar

The Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung has launched a large-scale conservation project that will focus on one of the collection’s most important works over the next few years.

Thousand-year-old cathedral surrenders its secrets, stone by stone

The secrets of Norway’s St Olav’s shrine and Nidaros Cathedral have drawn pilgrims for nearly a thousand years. Curious researchers have also made the journey, eager to solve the mysteries locked up in the cathedral’s stones.

St Albans Cathedral Finds Lost Abbot

Archaeologists from the Canterbury Archaeological Trust (CAT) working at St Albans Cathedral have discovered the grave of John of Wheathampstead, a former Abbot of national and international renown, who died in 1465, and whose burial site had remained a mystery up until now. In an extremely rare development, the team also discovered three papal seals, […]

Are These the Bones of Santa Claus?

A new radio carbon analysis of a relic claimed to be part of St. Nicholas’ pelvis suggests the bone could possibly be authentic. Using a micro-sample of bone fragment originally held in Lyon, France, Professor Tom Higham and Dr Georges Kazan, the Directors of the Oxford Relics Cluster at Keble College’s Advanced Studies Centre, tested […]

Call for Papers: Omission – University of Oxford English Faculty Graduate Conference 2018

From lost or damaged Medieval manuscripts to censored modernist texts, omissions have marked and shaped our critical practices.

medievalverse magazine