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Video: Porpoise found in medieval graveyard

Here is the video of an interesting archaeological discovery on the island of Chapelle Dom Hue near Guernsey.

Animals came with medieval trade in Indian Ocean, researchers find

The earliest introduction of domestic chickens and black rats from Asia to the east coast of Africa came via maritime routes between the 7th and 8th centuries AD.

The First Zero

When did the mathematical zero begin being used? New research revealed this week by the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries shows that a manuscript from India bearing the symbol was written in the 3rd or 4th century, making it the world’s oldest recorded origin of the zero that we use today.

Archaeologists explore medieval manor linked with the Knights Hospitallers

University of Leicester archaeologists have returned this month to Castle Hill Country Park at Beaumont Leys to continue exploring a large scheduled ancient monument, Castle Hill, believed to be the remains of a medieval manorial site linked with the Knights Hospitallers. Last year, a two-week community dig on the site uncovered well-preserved medieval archaeology dating […]

The Vikings are coming to Toronto

The Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Toronto, Canada will be hosting the final stop of the North American tour of Vikings: The Exhibition. Beginning on November 4th, it draws on current archaeological scholarship and research, offering a fresh perspective on the Viking age that challenges some of the commonly held myths and perceptions about the […]

Neath Abbey reconstructed digitally

Neath Abbey — a site that has witnessed Cistercian monks, Tudor splendour and thriving industry over its 900-year history — will share its story with visitors in a new digital reconstruction.

Byzantine mosaic discovered in Jerusalem

Israeli archaeologists have discovered a 1,500 year old mosaic floor near the Damascus Gate in the Old City of Jerusalem. It is believed to be part of a hostel built by the Byzantine emperor Justinian for Christian pilgrims.

Medieval Gospel Commentary, lost for 1500 years – now translated and online

The earliest Latin Commentary on the Gospels, lost for over 1500 years, has been rediscovered and made available in English for the first time, thanks to research from the University of Birmingham.

Call for Papers: Medievalism in Popular Culture

PCA/ACA 2018 National Conference – March 28th – 31st, 2018 – Indianapolis, Indiana

Global Medieval Sourcebook launched

A new website curated by Stanford faculty and students, the Global Medieval Sourcebook, translates medieval literature into English for the first time.

260,000 digitized images of Jewish art and artifacts now online

The Hebrew University’s Center for Jewish Art has launched the world’s largest index of Jewish Art, a collection of more than 260,000 digitized images of Jewish objects and artifacts from all over the world.

DNA samples reveal Viking Age fish trade

It has been assumed that the Vikings were trading in cod, but so far solid evidence has been lacking. With new methods, it is possible to extract ancient DNA from fishbone remnants and this can provide some exciting new information!

Fused Imaging Reveals Sixth-Century Writing Hidden Inside Bookbinding

After being hidden for centuries, the secrets within medieval manuscripts might soon come to light.

X-rays identify medieval manuscript ink

Analyzing pigments in medieval illuminated manuscript pages at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) is opening up some new areas of research bridging the arts and sciences.

Archaeologists unearth medieval treasures at Pictish fort

Scottish archaeologists exploring a Pictish fort have discovered surprising treasures, including an eleven-hundred year old coin.

St Columba’s cell revealed by archaeologists

This discovery is massive. St Columba is a key figure in Western Christendom. He was the national patron saint of Scotland in the Middle Ages.

What’s more bloody – Game of Thrones or the Wars of the Roses?

Has Game of Thrones become far too bloody? Surprisingly, statistical analyses actually indicate that the fictional show is quite realistic compared to a real life medieval civil war.

Call for Papers: The Medieval Horse – IMC 2018

Call for Papers for the sessions on THE MEDIEVAL HORSE at the International Medieval Congress 2018 at Leeds, 2-5 July 2018

Digging up fun at York

The Coppergate Shopping Centre, the site of one of the most famous archaeological digs of modern times, will be transformed into a hands-on archaeological adventure this week to celebrate the annual Festival of Archaeology.

St Augustine’s Abbey recreated digitally

St Augustine’s Abbey – part of Canterbury’s World Heritage site – has been ‘rebuilt’ in virtual reality as part of a ground-breaking collaboration between English Heritage and the University of Kent.

Illuminating Women in the Medieval World at the Getty

New exhibit open now at the Getty Museum! Illuminating Women in the Medieval World June 20-September 17, 2017 Curated by Christine Sciacca Modern portrayals of medieval women tend toward stereotypical images of damsels in distress, mystics in convents, female laborers in the fields, and even women of ill repute. In fact, women’s roles in the […]

Brewing Viking beer — with stones

There’s nothing archaeologists like better than piles of centuries-old rubbish. Ancient bones and stones from trash heaps can tell complex stories. And in central Norway, at least, the story seems to be that Vikings and their descendants brewed beer by tossing hot rocks into wooden kettles

The Newberry Library Announces Year-Long ‘Religious Change’ Project

Coinciding with the 500th anniversary of Luther’s 95 Theses, the project will include public programs, digital resources, and a gallery exhibition The Newberry Library in Chicago, Illinois announces the public launch of Religious Change, 1450 – 1700, a multidisciplinary project drawing on the full range of the library’s programs, services, and staff expertise. Coinciding with […]

Viking ‘Thing’ discovered in Sherwood Forest

A Viking Assembly site or ‘Thing’ has been discovered in the heart of England’s Sherwood Forest.

Koroneburg Renaissance Festival Returns!

Koroneburg Renaissance Festival is excited to once again open its doors on weekends starting May 27 through June 25, 2017 after several years of being shuttered. Thanks to new management, Koroneburg Renaissance Festival has been revitalized in order to offer the most interactive history faire experience in communities adjacent to Los Angeles, California. “Our goal […]

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