Early Medieval Celtic Art in Britain and Ireland: A Curator’s Perspective

Gundestrup Cauldron. Silver. Gundestrup, northern Denmark, 100 BC–AD 1. © The National Museum of Denmark.

Martin Golberg, Senior Curator at the National Museums of Scotland, travelled to the British Museum to give audiences perspective on the various pieces in the exhibit as well as an introduction to what constitutes “Celtic” art.

Medieval Oslo recreated on Minecraft

minecraft medieval oslo

A new Youtube video is showing the results of a project by history students at the University of Oslo where they recreate how a city looked in the Middle Ages. ‘Oslo recreated to year 1300′ was made by undergraduates taking part in the university’s Oslo in the Middle Ages course under John McNicol. The project involved […]

I’ll Eat My Hat If It’s Richard: Dr. Turi King on the Impact of the Richard III Project

Dr. Turi King giving her talk on the discovery of Richard III at the 'Making the Medieval Relevant' conference

Turi King discusses some of the more humorous circumstances surrounding Richard III’s discovery, the science behind the dig, and the media onslaught that ensued.

Is Ashgate Publishing about to close?


With Ashgate Publishing’s American office closing this week, and its British office rumoured to do the same next month, it seems that days are numbered for one of the most important publisher’s in the field of medieval studies.

Free Online course – Exploring English: Magna Carta

magna carta online course

The British Council and FutureLearn are teaming up to offer a free online course on Magna Carta aimed at non-native English speakers. The course, Exploring English: Magna Carta, begins next week.

The Struggle is Real: Where are the Medieval Economists?!

Dr. Daniel Curtis presenting his talk at, "Making the Medieval Relevant" at the University of Nottingham.

Another fascinating paper from “Making the Medieval Relevant” was given by Daniel Curtis, a specialist in Social and Economic History, and a professor at the University of Utrecht.

Video shows the reconstruction of an Early Medieval Turf House

Photo by Frans de Vries / University of Groningen

This time-lapse video shows the reconstruction of an early medieval turf house in the northern Dutch town of Firdgum.

Christmas market coming to York’s Barley Hall

York’s Barley Hall decorated for their Festive Medieval Market, which runs 26th to 29th November. Photo courtesy York Archaeological Trust

If you are interested in a Christmas market with a medieval flavour, Barley Hall in York will be the place to go later this month, as they are organising a festive shopping treat stocked full of unique gifts.

Call for Papers: International Society of Medievalism Annual Conference

Call for Papers

The next annual conference of the International Society of Medievalism will take place at Bamberg University and is scheduled to take place 18-20 July 2016.

Yale University acquires ‘treasure trove’ of medieval manuscripts

Otto_Ege_Press_Realease 5

Otto F. Ege, an Ohio-based scholar and book dealer, made a controversial practice of dismantling medieval and Renaissance manuscripts and selling the individual leaves for profit during the first half of the last century.

Why Tolkien’s Beowulf is an ‘amazing book but a terrible translation’

tolkien beowulf middle earth

In the spring of 2014 a translation of Beowulf by J.R.R. Tolkien was published. Last week, Andy Orchard, one of the leading scholars of Old English, offered his thoughts about the book and revealed that he will be writing his own translation of the famous medieval poem.

1,000 year old silver treasure hoard discovered in Denmark

Coins discovered on the Danish island of Omø - photo courtesy Museum Vestsjælland

Over 550 silver items have been discovered on the Danish island of Omø. The hoard is believed to date from around the reign of Sweyn Forkbeard (986–1014) and includes coins and pieces of jewellery.

Free Online Course on Medieval Music Begins today

from ink to sound

The University of Basel and Future Learn have teamed up to offer a seven week free online course that will teach the history of musical notation in the Middle Ages, and show you how to decode medieval music manuscripts.

Agincourt 600 Celebrated with Pomp and Pageantry at Westminster Abbey

Diana Heath, Metalwork Conservator lays Henry V's sword on the High Altar at Westminster Abbey. Photo courtesy of Dean & Chapter of Westminster.

600 years ago, the bells of Westminster Abbey rang out as word arrived in London that Henry V had defeated the French in Agincourt. 600 years later to the very day, the bells pealed out again to commemorate a medieval battle where the English were vastly outnumbered but still came home victorious.

Medieval Monastic Library to be recreated online

Durham Priory Library Recreated project

Durham University and Durham Cathedral have teamed to digitally recreate a medieval monastic library.

John Gower’s Handwriting identified

British Library, Add. MS 59495, fol. 39v. - image from the International John Gower Society

John Gower, considered to be one of the greatest poets of medieval England, left behind several remarkable works. A scholar has now been able to identify poems that were written by his own hand, including a poignant piece about how he was going blind.

Chinese translation of De re metallica discovered

Kunyu gezhi (1640): End of the table of contents, with seals and a note added by later reader Photo: Dr. Cao Jin, by courtesy of Nanjing Library

Scholars from the University of Tübingen have discovered a 17th century Chinese translation of large parts of De re metallica or On the Nature of Metals, a mining handbook written by Georgius Agricola in 1556.

Glimpse of medieval trade revealed along the River Forth

School pupils from St Ninian's Primary School uncovering the medieval harbour of Cambuskenneth Abbey © GUARD Archaeology Ltd

Over two weeks in September, the Cambuskenneth Harbours project brought together a wide range of experts and local volunteers to investigate the medieval harbour of Cambuskenneth Abbey, which lies on the River Forth near Stirling.

Byzantine-era mosaic map restored in Israel

Photo by Nikki Davidov, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

Although the Byzantine-era church that existed about 1500 years ago in southern Israel no longer exists, its mosaic floor has now been restored and shows a map revealing a scene of streets and buildings from an Egyptian town.

Beautiful 15th century sculpture now on display at the Getty Museum

Saint Philip by the Master of the Rimini Altarpiece - photo courtesy The Getty Museum

The Getty Museum is now showing its latest acquisition – a rare medieval alabaster sculpture of Saint Philip by the Master of the Rimini Altarpiece.

Global Middle Ages Project launches website

Global Middle Ages Project

The Global Middle Ages Project, founded in 2007 by Geraldine Heng and Susan Noakes, features six digital projects.

The Vikings and clothing accessories they brought home

Mounting from a reliquary, produced in Northumbria in the 8th century. The mounting have been modified and was used as a brooch. It was found in a woman's grave from the second part of the 9th century, in Buskerud, Norway - Photo courtesy University of Oslo Museum of Cultural History

New study on the use of imported objects in Viking Age Scandinavia

Priests found spiritual satisfaction by serving nuns, Stanford medieval historian says

A female scribe and male artist present their book to the Virgin Mary in this medieval manuscript, called the Guta-Sintram Codex (c. 1154). The Codex supports Fiona Griffiths' finding that men and women collaborated during this period of history. Photo by Claude Truong-Ngoc / Wikimedia Commons

A study of medieval texts and imagery by Stanford history Professor Fiona Griffiths counters commonly held beliefs about misogynistic practices in medieval Europe. Griffiths’ research reveals how some male clergy acknowledged and celebrated the perceived religious superiority of nuns.

New Location for the Battle of Crécy discovered

Proposed site of the Battle of Crecy, showing the English and French approaches to the battlefield and the site of the English wagenburg and defensive ditch upon the site of the Herse, superimposed upon the modern topography. Image courtesy Michael Livingston

For over 250 years it has been believed that the Battle of Crécy, one of the most famous battles of the Middle Ages, was fought just north of the French town of Crécy-en-Ponthieu in Picardy. Now, a new book that contains the most intensive examination of sources about the battle to date, offers convincing evidence that the fourteenth-century battle instead took place 5.5 km to the south.

Between 50 and 75 medieval skeletons discovered at Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey - photo by Daniel Gillaspia / Flickr

Archaeologists have discovered the skeletal remains of between 50 to 75 individuals buried in the walls of Westminster Abbey. It is believed that they date from the 11th or early 12th century.

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