Anne Boleyn’s Songbook

Anne Boleyn's Songbook - photo courtesy Heather Teysko

Now for the first time in 500 years much of the music included in Anne Boleyn’s songbook has been recorded by the Alamire Consort, under the direction of Dr. David Skinner of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge University.

Exploring Medieval Manuscripts: An Interview with Erik Kwakkel

Erik Kwakkel - Photo by Willem-Jan Schipper

‘I love that something quirky and nerdy like the medieval book is becoming mainstream.’

The Medieval Magazine – Issue 36

medieval mag 36

This week’s issue focuses on medieval manuscripts – you can check out a list of the most beautiful manuscripts made in the Middle Ages, and read an interview with Erik Kwakkel, the leading historian in the field.

Medieval Manuscripts in Living Colour

Book of Kells, Folio 32v, Christ Enthroned.

How did medieval people get such magnificent colour, and how can it still be so brilliant a thousand years later? Here’s a five-minute look at colouring manuscripts.

Top 10 Most Beautiful Medieval Manuscripts

most beautiful medieval manuscripts lindisfarne gospels

Giovanni Scorcioni gives us his list of the most beautiful manuscripts of the Middle Ages

Which Empire Do You Belong In?


Ever wonder which historical empire you are best fitted for? Find out here!

New Location for the Battle of Crécy discovered

Proposed site of the Battle of Crecy, showing the English and French approaches to the battlefield and the site of the English wagenburg and defensive ditch upon the site of the Herse, superimposed upon the modern topography. Image courtesy Michael Livingston

For over 250 years it has been believed that the Battle of Crécy, one of the most famous battles of the Middle Ages, was fought just north of the French town of Crécy-en-Ponthieu in Picardy. Now, a new book that contains the most intensive examination of sources about the battle to date, offers convincing evidence that the fourteenth-century battle instead took place 5.5 km to the south.

The Medieval Magazine – Issue 35

mag 35

This week we explore the early stages of the Hundred Years War, revealing new details about the Battle of Crécy, and telling the story of Fiery Joanna’s defence of Hennebont. You can also read about rune stones, the Celts, and Icelandic sagas.

Who Were The Celts? The British Museum Offers Answers with New Exhibition

Gundestrup Cauldron Silver  Gundestrup, northern Denmark, 100 BC–AD 1 © The National Museum of Denmark. The British Museum. Photo by

The British Museum just opened its latest exhibit, Celts: Art and Identity this past Thursday, covering 2,500 years of Celtic history. The exhibit explores Celtic identity and how it eveolved from the time of the Ancient Greeks to the present through art, culture, daily life, religion and politics.

‘The boldest and most remarkable feat ever performed by a woman’: Fiery Joanna and the Siege of Hennebont

Fierry Joanna leads the charge - from La Bretagne ancienne, published in 1859

It ranks as one of the most fascinating stories from the 14th century, one that chroniclers of that time relished in telling and historians have ever since recounted.

5 Cool Celtic Things at the British Museum

(L) Horned helmet. Bronze, glass, Found along the Thames river near Waterloo, London, England (200-100 BC). (R) Greek helmet, bronze. Olympia, South-Western Greece (460 BC), The British Museum.Photo by

I attended the opening of the British Museum’s, Celts: Art and Identity exhibit on Sept 24th. It showcases stunning art, jewellery, weaponry, daily and religious objects to tell the story of the Celtic people.

Five Medieval Minutes with Steven Muhlberger

combat of the thirty

Formal deeds of arms were an opportunity for one group of people to show off their skills – particularly their horsemanship – and for other people to appreciate how bold and daring they were.

Medieval Fort Building 101

16th century stonemason at work

What does it take to build a fortification in the 10th century?

The Battle of Neville’s Cross as told in the Lanercost Chronicle

Battle of Neville's Cross from a 15th-century Froissart manuscript

The year 1346 is remembered in England mostly for the Battle of Crecy, where King Edward III defeated the French forces in one of the most important battles of the Hundred Years War. That year also saw another major battle, this one fought on English soil.

Another Medieval Drinking Song

Image by Matthäus Fridrich from the 16th century

But bring us in good ale, good ale, and bring us in good ale,
For our blessed Lady’s sake, bring us in good ale!

Ten Castles that Made Medieval Britain: Tintagel Castle

Tintagel Castle - photo by Ben Salter / Flickr

The bleached bones of a blasted cliff-top castle, scourged by leaping sea and howling wind, Tintagel made as much from tempered dreams as carved stone still has the power to inspire.

How to Make Ink in the Middle Ages

Donatus writing his grammar, his ink-pot held by a monk labelled 'Heinre' - from British Library Arundel 43   f. 80v

Creating everyday objects in the Middle Ages often took a lot time and effort. If you needed ink, for example, and had to make it yourself, it could be several weeks before you could dip your quill into the inkwell.

Top 10 Medieval Book Curses

British Library Harley MS 2798, fol. 235v.

Christ’s curse upon the crook who takes away this book.

Szczecin: Castle of the Pomeranian Dukes

View of the castle taken from the top of St. Jakub’s Basilica. (Photo by

My visit to Berlin included a quick stop across the border to Poland, to visit Szczecin and the Castle of the Pomeranian Dukes.

Which 16th-century Monarch Would You Be?

16th century monarch

Find out which sixteenth century monarch most closely matches your style.

Five Reasons We’re Still Fascinated by the Templars

Knight Templar effigy at Temple Church in London - - Photo by Nick Garrod / Flickr

What is it about the Templars that makes them so fascinating?

Using LEGO to show the history of medieval England

Medieval Lego

Learn more about the great new book Medieval Lego, by Greyson Beights

Review: The Bastard Executioner: Pilot, Parts 1 and 2

bastard executioner review pilot

The Bastard Executioner is the latest TV series that medieval history lovers will be tuning into. Created by Kurt Sutter, who is best known for Sons of Anarchy, it promises a lot of blood, gore and violence.

New TV series: The Bastard Executioner

New TV series The Bastard Executioner

The first season of The Bastard Executioner begins on Tuesday, September 15th on the FX channel in the United States and Canada

Ten Castles that Made Medieval Britain: Warwick Castle

Warwick Castle from the outer court, painted by Canaletto in 1752

Raised amidst the settling dust of the Norman Conquest, the traditional seat of the Earldom of Warwick has continually throughout its millennia long and oft glorious history fundamentally reinvented itself, making it the Madonna of medieval military architecture.

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