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“A Well-Regulated Militia”: The Medieval Origins of the Second Amendment

As it turns out, weapons ownership—and its relationship to political rights, power, and masculine self-image—has deep roots in the Middle Ages. This in turns, explains how firearms came to be so entrenched in American culture.

The 50 Most Important Events of the Middle Ages

Our list of the most important events in the medieval world, between the years 500 and 1500 AD.

Before Dracula: The Rise and Fall of Whitby Abbey

But in addition to Bram and Dracula, Whitby Abbey has more stories to tell; and they are much more ancient than the immortal Count.

5,000,000 words: How St. Augustine’s works made it into the Middle Ages

This is the first in a series that will look over the shoulder of medieval readers to discover how they shaped Augustine’s legacy, and created an image of the man that has endured to our times.

Can you Solve these 10 Medieval Riddles?

Here are 10 riddles from the Middle Ages. How many can you answer?

New Medieval Books: Suger and Blood

Looking for something medieval to read? Here are five new books about the Middle Ages to check out…

NEW! The Medieval Magazine, No. 109: PILGRIMAGE

We look at medieval and modern pilgrimage in this issue, from the perils of travel, to the popular destinations, to souvenirs and salvation.

Medieval Geopolitics: The Medieval “Military Revolution”

From the late 1200s onward, royal warmaking capabilities underwent profound changes – changes that made them decisively less feudal and decidedly more state-like.

Murderous Mermaid: Why Siren Is More Medieval Than You Think

In medieval bestiaries, the Sirens are portrayed as deadly seducers who use their seductive songs to lure the sailors to sleep, and then attack them with sharp teeth and tear open their flesh.

Medieval swimming – from the Good to the Scared

The extent of summer swimming in medieval Europe is a fairly open question. We know that some people certainly could swim, although the skill was rare enough to be remarked.

“You will all be killed”: Medieval Life in War-Torn Paris

During the Hundred Years’ War, the city of Paris was captured and ruled by the English for sixteen years. The story of this violent and terrible period is vividly recounted by an anonymous writer, known as the Bourgeois de Paris.

Wild animals and medieval towns

In the year 1166, the town of Carmarthen in southern Wales was attacked by a rabid wolf, which bit 22 people.

Five Things to Know About Gerald of Wales

Gerald of Wales, or Giraldus Cambrensis, was a twelfth-century cleric who wrote a whole raft of influential works on clerical reform, kingship, and history.

Can You Identify These Gorgeous French Castles?

How well do you know the names of popular French castles?

NEW! The Medieval Magazine No. 108

Spring cleaning! The first issue of the Medieval Magazine with a fresh new face!
In this issue, we look at Norse seasons, medieval beliefs about luck, food and politics in Constantinople, Spanish Easter traditions, and the overlooked life of Catherine of Aragon.

Medieval manuscripts: Easter in the Book of Hours of Henry IV of France

On the occasion of the Easter holiday, we present a set of exceptional miniatures from the Book of Hours of Henry IV of France

How were medieval churches affected by the 2016 Umbrian earthquake?

In 2016, earthquakes in the Italian region of Umbria caused the collapse of several medieval churches, resulting in the destruction of local architectural and cultural heritage. A recent article investigates the cause of this problem and what may be done about it.

Reading Recommendations for a Marvellous Medieval Summer

In preparation for summer reading, Natalie Anderson shares some of her favourite works of medieval historical fiction.

Medieval Bodies: Life, Death and Art in the Middle Ages

In Medieval Bodies, art historian Jack Hartnell uncovers the complex and fascinating ways in which the people of the Middle Ages thought about, explored and experienced their physical selves.

Five Reasons to Hug a Medievalist

On March 31, we celebrate the annual International Hug a Medievalist day, a day on which we can all show our appreciation for the medievalists in our midst.

Who Were the Alans? Searching for an Early Medieval People

The Early Middle Ages saw many peoples migrating throughout Eurasia. In a talk given earlier this month at the University of Oxford, a Russian archaeologist offered new insights into the Alans.

How the borders of the British Isles changed during the Middle Ages

This video shows the rise and fall of kingdom and states in the British Isles from the year 43 CE to 2016.

10 things you might not know about British cathedrals

Discover 10 curious facts you might not know about Great Britain’s most famous cathedrals.

A Diet of Tournaments: Maximilian at Worms, 1495

In 1495, during the political negotiations surrounding the imperial diet in Worms, Maximilian I still found time to compete against a famous Burgundian knight in a tournament that was to reach legendary proportions.

Medieval Forensics: Investigating the Death of a Byzantine Emperor

John II Komnenos (1087-1143) was an accomplished and successful medieval ruler whose death has long been the subject of scholarly discussion. While out hunting, John was allegedly poisoned by an arrow – but was this really the cause of the emperor’s death?

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