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A Dynasty of Saints

By all accounts, St. Æthelthryth was married twice and remained a virgin. During her life she was a princess of East Anglia, queen of Northumbria, and finally abbess and founder of the monastery at Ely.

The Light of Nature? No ‘Experience’ in the Middle Ages!

When we think of the concept of experience, we would most likely not be thinking of the Middle Ages.

Policing Violence: Royal and Community Perspectives in Medieval France

It is the purpose of this thesis to demonstrate that there were legitimate and acceptable forms of violence that could be used to police society.

Naming Particulars: A Thirteenth-Century Debate on Whether Individuals Have Proper Names

This dissertation is about a debate that occurred in thirteenth-century philosophy over an apparently bizarre question: Can individuals really have proper names?

The dragon’s skull: how can zooarchaeologists contribute to our understanding of otherness in the Middle Ages?

This paper explores how the study of animal bones, and the material practices associated with responses to other species, can build on the foundations of existing scholarship on otherness, alterity and monstrosity. 

New Medieval Books: To be an artist or a warrior

This week’s look at five books about the Middle Ages

Medieval Tightrope Walking

Even in the Middle Ages one can find accounts of people doing death-defying stunts for our entertainment.

Medieval and modern concepts of rights: how do they differ?

The concept of a right has not changed since the middle ages and neither have the kinds of justifications given for recognising rights.

Viking ‘Thing’ discovered in Sherwood Forest

A Viking Assembly site or ‘Thing’ has been discovered in the heart of England’s Sherwood Forest.

How Medieval Kings and Queens raised their children – an interview with Carolyn Harris

Carolyn Harris’ latest book Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting looks at the unique challenges of being parents to princes and princesses.

The career of Roger Mortimer, first earl of March (c.1287-1330)

A straightforward analysis of his regime is accompanied by a demonstration that, even though the court dictated political life, Roger Mortimer was able to extend his influence across the British Isles and pose a serious threat to the kingship of Edward III.

Ireland in Late Antiquity: A Forgotten Frontier?

This paper argues that it is more fruitful to examine the relationship between Ireland and its neighbors from c. 150–c. 550 C.E., through a frontier dynamic, a dynamic in which religious identity was but one factor among many.

Ruined medieval castle for sale in England

The beautiful ruins of a 14th century castle in northern England have gone up for sale.

New Medieval Books: Hocus pocus

We add a little magic to this week’s list of new books about the Middle Ages.

10 Medieval Royal Parents Whose Decisions Influence the Lives of Royal Children Today

From royal baby names to marrying for love – how five medieval English couples influence the lives of royal children today.

Justinian and the Senate of Rome under Ostrogothic Rule

Although this law deals with a dry, technical matter, interesting only to the students of Roman civil law, especially testamentary law, it is also quite interesting for the study of the law making procedure in the time of Justinian.

What is Medieval Paratext?

When considering medieval manuscripts, what is marginal, and what is not?

Willing Body, Willing Mind: Non-Combatant Culpability According to English Combatant Writers, 1327–77

In this essay I challenge these notions by exploring English combatants’ presentation of devastation and attacks against noncombatants during the wars of Edward III.

Conference: Discovering William of Malmesbury

Saturday, July 15, 2017 at Malmesbury Abbey

Donationes pro remedio animae as Total Social Facts: A Case Study from the Twelfth Century Margraviate of Istria

The author analyzes the donation charter by which a noble couple, Ulrich II and his wife Adelaide, gifted numerous properties in Istria to the Church of Aquileia for the salvation of their souls (16th November, 1102).

How Legend Constructs French National Identity: Jeanne d’Arc

Since the fifteenth century, French authors have (re)told the story of Jeanne d’Arc.

Medieval Ideas of the Multiverse

To most of the theologians in Paris, anything not forbidden by logical contradiction was possible for God.

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