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The Revolt of St Tito in Fourteenth-Century Venetian Crete: A Reassessment

The Revolt of St Tito in Fourteenth-Century Venetian Crete: A Reassessment

By Sally McKee

Mediterranean Historical Review, Vol.9 (1995)

Introduction: In the summer of 1363, a rebellion broke out in the Venetian colony of Crete. The Revolt of St Tito, as the insurrection came to be called, differed from previous revolts on the island, in that instigators were members of the local Latin elite, whose purpose for settling on Crete had been to safeguard Venetian possession. They were called feudatories on account of the primarily rural units of property, feuda, that they held from the Commune, and over the preceeding years they had been taxed by the government to a point where some felt they had to resist any new fiscal burden. Since Venice had first occupied the island in 1211, the Commune had steadily increased the amount of tax it required from the feudatories and the rest of the colony’s population.

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