How the borders of Asia changed during the Middle Ages

Here are a few sets of videos to show the rise and fall of kingdoms, states and empires on the continent of Asia, including during the medieval period.

How the borders of Europe changed during the Middle Ages

One interesting way of looking at the past is to see how much the borders of the world have changed. In these videos, a reconstruction has been made to show the rise and fall of European kingdoms, states, and empires over the years, decades and centuries.

One of his own: the Irish participant in the assassination of Tigernán Ua Ruairc

Tigernán Ua Ruairc was King of Bréifne and Conmaicne. In fact this kingdom reached its greatest extent during his long reign, between c. 1124 and his assassination in 1172.

Multilingualism and Empires: Byzantium and Sasanian Persia

The long and bitter confrontation between Byzantium and the Sasanian Empire was one of the most important historical phenomena of Late Antiquity; it was also very significant for the development of later mediaeval societies and institutions in East and West.

The Original Hamlet: The Story of Prince Amleth

Well, everyone knows the story of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. Even though you have never finished the book, you are bound to have seen some version of it, be it excerpts, summarising tales, films, plays, or art works. What may be not so well known, however, is the story of Amleth, the prototype of Hamlet.

Two Lessons from Late Medieval Politics

Mass culture tells us that medieval political life was somewhat like ‘Game of Thrones’. This image is rather far from the complexities of late medieval politics, where institutions played at least as big a role as kings and queens.

Matthias Corvinus and Charles the Bold

The paper investigates the diplomatic relations of Matthias Corvinus with the Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, focusing on the 1460s and ‘70s.

The limits of the late Anglo-Saxon state

Were there structural flaws in the late Anglo-Saxon state which contributed to its demise?

The Walk to Canossa: The Tale of an Emperor and a Pope

Ever since it happened people have been debating what took place at Canossa. Some have called it a brilliant masterstroke by Emperor Henry IV, while others have termed it his humiliation.

The Cadaver Synod: Low Point in the History of the Papacy

The notorious Cadaver Synod, when one Pope put on trial the corpse of one of his predecessors. Perhaps the lowest point in the history of the Papacy, the story of this trial is as murky as it is strange.

The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, No. 12) : Medieval Nation

In this issue we tackle National Holidays and the development of Nations, manuscripts at the Getty, and look at courtly festivities and jousting in London. We’re also baking bread Viking style, taking a trip to Avignon, and joining the medieval navy!

The Evil That Kings Do: Kingship, Tyranny and William I in Hugo Falcandus

A study of the presentation of William I of Sicily in the work of the pseudo – Hugo Falcandus, with particular attention to the author’s views on the entirety of the Hauteville dynasty and kingship in Sicily through the lens of his reign.

The many faces of Duchess Matilda: matronage, motherhood and mediation in the twelfth century

In this book I argue that the varied visual and textual source material related to Matilda (1156-1189) provides an insight into her duties and responsibilities at her husband’s court.

The career of Roger Mortimer, first earl of March (c.1287-1330)

A straightforward analysis of his regime is accompanied by a demonstration that, even though the court dictated political life, Roger Mortimer was able to extend his influence across the British Isles and pose a serious threat to the kingship of Edward III.

Donationes pro remedio animae as Total Social Facts: A Case Study from the Twelfth Century Margraviate of Istria

The author analyzes the donation charter by which a noble couple, Ulrich II and his wife Adelaide, gifted numerous properties in Istria to the Church of Aquileia for the salvation of their souls (16th November, 1102).

Female Secret Agents in the Middle Ages

When we talk about spies in the Middle Ages, it’s easy to envision soldiers sneaking into enemy camps or royal messengers with a hidden agenda.

The Idea of World Domination in the Public Consciousness in Europe in the Early and Developed Middle Ages

The article explores a public thought and public consciousness in the early and developed Middle Ages in Europe.

Intercession and Motherhood: The Queenships of Philippa of Hainault and Anne of Bohemia

In this post, author Conor Byrne discusses the rule of two medieval queens: Anne of Bohemia and Philippa of Hainault.

Queenship in England: 1308-1485 Gender and Power in the Late Middle Ages: Book Tour and Giveaway!

Medieval Readers! Today, we’re hosting day 3 of Conor Byrne’s Book Tour and running an international contest to give away a copy of his latest novel: Queenship in England: 1308-1485 Gender and Power in the Late Middle Ages Want a chance to win it?

Genghis Khan’s Womenfolk: How Imperial Women Shaped the Mongol Conquests and the Mongol Empire

In this lecture, Professor Broadbridge will present three key moments from Mongol history to illustrate the way that imperial women’s contributions have dramatically changed Mongol history as we know it.

The Impact of the White Ship Disaster

An in-depth look at the White Ship disaster of 1120 and the impact it had on English succession.

The Concept of a Boundary Between the Latin and the Byzantine Civilizations of Europe

This boundary runs from the Barents Sea in the north to the Adriatic Sea in the south. On its western side nations are associated with the Latin legacy, while on the eastern side are those that relate to the Byzantine tradition and later on, to Moscow.

Popular Politics and Public Opinion in Late Medieval Paris

Michael Sizer discusses the popular politics of late medieval Paris (1380-1422) and what bearing it may have on the way we understand popular political culture today.

What Happened to the Grandsons and Great-grandsons of the House of York?

The Tudors, according to Tudor propaganda, brought an end to 30 years of civil war between the Houses of York and Lancaster, merging the two families through Henry VII’s marriage to Elizabeth of York, the eldest daughter of the Yorkist King Edward IV, the son of Duke Richard.

Imperial Electioneering: The Evolution of the Election in the Holy Roman Empire from the Collapse of the Carolingians to the Rise of the Ottonians

This election set the Holy Roman Empire apart from the Carolingian Empire and the rest of Europe. This strange political development would define the Holy Roman Empire and central Europe for centuries to come.

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