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Archives for May 2011

“Inside that fortress sat a few peasant men, and it was half-made”: a study of ‘Viking’ fortifications in the British Isles, AD 793-1066

The study of Viking fortifications is a neglected subject which could reveal much to archaeologists about the Viking way of life.

‘í litklæðum’ – Coloured Clothes in Medieval Scandinavian Literature and Archaeology

What do we mean by ‘coloured clothes’? Or rather, what did the saga writers mean by their term litklæði?

Nautical and Marine Imagery in the Panegyrics of Eustathios of Thessaloniki

Nautical and Marine Imagery in the Panegyrics of Eustathios of Thessaloniki By Andrew F. Stone Scholia, Vol. 12 (2003) Abstract: The panegyrics of twelfth-century Byzantium, with their conventional images such as those of the sea, have tended to be disregarded due to a feeling that these images are both derivative and predictable. This is not […]

Learning by Doing: Coping with Inquisitors in Medieval Languedoc

Among these is the rich mass of documentation relating to the inquisition of heretical depravity in Languedoc in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries

Hellenistic Residue in Central Asia under Islamic Regimes

Hellenistic Residue in Central Asia under Islamic Regimes By Xinru Liu Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in History and Archaeology, Vol. 1, No. 2 (2004) Abstract: Islamic scholars in the Middle Age translated many Greek, Persian, and Sanskrit literature into Arabic. Among the many scholars who contributed to scholarship in the Islamic world, Central Asia produced […]

The Ecology of Crusading project: new research on medieval Baltic landscapes

The Ecology of Crusading project is a new programme of research investigating the environmental impact of the Baltic Crusades.

Fashion in the Middle Ages exhibition begins at the Getty

The J. Paul Getty Museum unveils a new medieval exhibition tomorrow, which will examine what people wore during this period. Fashion in the Middle Ages, on display from May 31 to August 14, 2011, explores how medieval artists used costumes to identify people by profession or to place them in a social hierarchy and at […]

Faces of medieval people revealed at Stirling Castle

A new exhibition at Stirling Castle in Scotland will bring visitors face to face with knight and lady excavated from its lost royal chapel. Scientific research has revealed that at least five of the medieval people whose skeletons were discovered at Stirling Castle suffered brutally violent deaths. The discovery offers an extraordinarily rare insight into […]

John Cabot and Christopher Columbus Revisited

John Cabot and Christopher Columbus Revisited By Francesc Albardaner i Llorens The Northern Mariner, Vol.10, No. 2 (2000) Introduction: The Iberian peninsula is very rich in historical archives, and research in their holdings occasionally unearths new documents about important historical figures. While the most famous archives have been catalogued, and their most important documents studied […]

Dyeing with Tannic Acid and Iron: Walnut Husks

This paper discusses the use of walnut to dye fabric.

Gallows in Late Medieval Frisia

Gallows in Late Medieval Frisia By Johannes A. Mol Advances in Old Frisian Philology, edited by Rolf H. Bremmer Jr., Stephen Laker and Oebele Vries (Amsterdam, 2007) Introduction: Gallows were a familiar sight in the landscape of fifteenth-century Frisia. I am not thinking here primarily of temporary installations erected for executions in the town square […]

Sharing Sacred Space: Holy Places in Jerusalem Between Christianity, Judaism, and Islam

One of the most intriguing phenomena in the study of sacred space and pilgrimage to holy places is how believers of different faiths may share sanctity.

A Catalan Contribution to the Converso Controversy

A Catalan Contribution to the Converso Controversy Aronson-Friedman, Amy Mediterranean Studies, Volume 14 (2005) Abstract THE MARGINALIZATION OF CATALAN LITERARY WORKS from the canon of Hispanic literature is the result of a tendency by many critics to disregard works written in languages other than Castilian. Jaume Roig’s Spill o Llibre de les dones is one […]

COUNT IVAN ANŽ FRANKOPAN, THE ROYAL STEWARD OF THE ESTATE IN SWEDEN 1426 – 1434

COUNT IVAN ANŽ FRANKOPAN, THE ROYAL STEWARD OF THE ESTATE IN SWEDEN1426 – 1434 Ibler, Malden Croatian History (2005) Abstract Within the framework of medieval history of Europe and its own geostrategic location, Scandinavian royalties and nobility entertained contacts with central and western Europe. Less known however, is the relationship between Eric of Pomerania, the King […]

Recent Research on Canons Regular in the German Empire of the 11th and 12th Centuries

For decades the reform movement of the canons of the 11th and 12th centuries remained to a great degree unnoticed by historians. The Premonstratensians, who in this report are treated only in passing, have to be regarded as a certain exception.

The Resolution of Commercial Conflicts in Bruges, Antwerp, and Amsterdam (1250-1650)

The Resolution of Commercial Conflicts in Bruges, Antwerp, and Amsterdam (1250-1650) Gelderblom, Oscar  (Utrecht University) Merchants in the Low Countries: The Organization of Long-Distance Trade in Bruges, Antwerp, and Amsterdam (1250-1650) (2008) Abstract Even if merchants carefully select their trading partners and closely monitor their behavior, chances remain that the other party walks away with either goods […]

Michelangelo’s Moses of the Julius Tomb: The Definitive Michelangelo Sculpture

Michelangelo’s Moses of the Julius Tomb is one of the most powerful works from one of the most important artists of all time. Michelangelo is perhaps best known for the David.

Early medieval Wales: an updated framework for archaeological research

Early medieval Wales: an updated framework for archaeological research By Nancy Edwards, Alan Lane and Mark Redknap Paper given at the RENEWING THE RESEARCH FRAMEWORK FOR THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF WALES (2010) Introduction: The early middle ages (c. AD 400–1070), which span the centuries between the end of Roman rule and the coming of the Normans, […]

Household Men, Mercenaries and Vikings in Anglo-Saxon England

Mercenary soldiers played a crucial role in both the birth and death of Anglo-Saxon England.

Crusades on the Water: A New (Integrated) View

Crusades on the Water: A New (Integrated) View By Dana Cushing Paper given at the 46th International Congress on Medieval Studies (2011) Introduction: My paper today seeks to integrate sources from across time, cultures, and disciplines to achieve a better understanding of the Crusades, and to change our focus from land to sea. To answer Tyerman’s […]

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