Advertisement

Why did the Vikings attack?

For women, slaves, or in self-defence – what made the Vikings explode out of Denmark and Norway around the year 800?

Blood Cries Afar: The Forgotten Invasion of England, 1216

The large French expeditionary force that landed in England in May 1216 allied with baronial rebels against King John to divide the country for eighteen months. For a year the French occupied and ruled the richest one-third of England, including the capital, London.

Fighting in women’s clothes: The pictorial evidence of Walpurgis in Ms. I.33

Ms. I.33 is not only the oldest of the known fencing treatises in European context, it is also the only one showing a woman fighting equally with contemporary men.

Who were the Templars?

The idea of the Knights Templar looked good on paper. Have knights from across Europe join a monastic order that would defend the Holy Land from non-Christians. They would be devout warriors fighting on behalf of God, an example for all of Christendom. What could go wrong?

The Square “Fighting March” of the Crusaders at the Battle of Ascalon (1099)

In this paper I will examine a number of theories about the origin of this particular marching formation, based on the manuals attributed to the Byzantine Emperors Maurice (582–602), Leo VI (886–912) and Nicephoros Phocas (963– 69) and several anonymous Byzantine military treatises of the sixth and tenth centuries.

Were Christians and Muslims Allies in the First Crusade?

In this article, we present the case that an alliance existed between the Crusaders and the Fatimid rulers of Egypt, and it was only when that alliance broke down that Jerusalem would become the target of a military attack.

“A Well-Regulated Militia”: The Medieval Origins of the Second Amendment

As it turns out, weapons ownership—and its relationship to political rights, power, and masculine self-image—has deep roots in the Middle Ages. This in turns, explains how firearms came to be so entrenched in American culture.

Medieval Geopolitics: The Medieval “Military Revolution”

From the late 1200s onward, royal warmaking capabilities underwent profound changes – changes that made them decisively less feudal and decidedly more state-like.

“You will all be killed”: Medieval Life in War-Torn Paris

During the Hundred Years’ War, the city of Paris was captured and ruled by the English for sixteen years. The story of this violent and terrible period is vividly recounted by an anonymous writer, known as the Bourgeois de Paris.

Noble warriors: the military elite and Henry VIII’s expeditions of 1513 and 1544

This thesis is concerned with identifying and understanding the typical behaviour of the early Tudor nobility, particularly in relation to military activity.

Survival at the frontier of Holy War: political expansion, crusading, commerce and the medieval colonizing settlement at Biała Gora, North Poland 

In the southern Baltic, episodes of colonisation were accompanied by processes of military conquest, political subjugation and religious conversion.

Reframing the Conversation on Medieval Military Strategy

This question of the history of strategy is a question of intellectual history: did medieval writers generate and transmit derivative and/or original ideas about how to wage war?

Medieval Geopolitics: The Two Types of Warfare in Medieval Europe

In this, the first post of the Medieval Geopolitics series, I take a look at the two types of political war fought in medieval Europe.

Simon de Montfort and King Henry III: The First Revolution in English History, 1258–1265

The reign of Henry III (1216–1272) was pivotal in English political history. It saw the entrenchment of Magna Carta, the growth of parliament and the widening of political society, as well as England’s first revolution (1258–1265), led by Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester.

Historical European Martial Art: a crossroad between academic research, martial heritage re-creation and martial sport practices

This paper will propose and discuss, ideas on how to bridge the gap between enthusiasts and scholars; since their embodied knowledge, acquired by practice, is of tremendous value for scientific inquiries and scientific experimentation.

7 Devious Ways to Defeat a Medieval Army

Could you defeat a medieval army without resorting to a clash of arms? A 10th century Byzantine military manual offers several tricks that could be used to devastate your enemy.

Historiography of Falkirk (1298) as the Predecessor to Infantry Dominance

For more than a century, historians have identified the Battle of Falkirk (1298) as a turning point in infantry tactics, not only for the Scots but also for warfare in the Western World.

Collapse of the Hunnic Empire: Jordanes, Ardaric and the Battle of Nedao

This thesis examines the evidence surrounding the Battle of Nedao, an engagement between Ardaric, leader of the Gepids and other rebelling tribes, and Ellac, the eldest son of Attila.

Soldiers, Villagers and Politics: Military Violence and the Jacquerie of 1358

The Jacquerie of 1358 remains a hotly contested incident, but the importance of soldiers as a cause of the revolt is one of the few things on which scholars agree.

The Florentine Army in the Age of the Companies of Adventure

The Florentine army was, in contrast to the current literature, not an ad hoc and temporary entity but the product of careful consideration and coordination. 

When Medieval England was Almost Invaded

Froissart enthusiastically notes that many among the French host ‘considered England to be already crushed and devastated, all her men killed, and her women and children brought to France in slavery’.

Prisoners of War in the Albigensian Crusade, 1209-1229

The Albigensian Crusade is generally considered a brutal war because of the manner in which both sides treated the enemy, especially the prisoners. This article analyzes the causes of this apparent absence of war conventions.

Captives in Mediaeval Spain: The Castilian-Leonese and Muslim Experience (XI-XIII Centuries)

War in the borders between Castilian-Leonese kingdom and al-Andalus during the 11th-13th centuries was an economic activity in which booty allowed some people to enrich themselves, while captives were a substantial part of the war profits.

Modern mathematics is used to solve question about medieval war

In the year 1014, the fate of Ireland would be decided at the Battle of Clontarf. The Irish King Brian Boru would defeat a Viking army, although at the cost of his own life. However, there is one historical debate about this conflict – was it really a battle against the Vikings, or an internal civil war?

Escaping the Mongols: A Survivor’s Account from the 13th century

In the year 1241, a Mongol army invaded eastern Europe, ravaging Poland, Hungary, Croatia and Romania.

medievalverse magazine