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Masks of the Dark Goddess in Arthurian Literature: Origin and Evolution of Morgan le Fay

The world of Arthurian legend is one steeped in mythology and magic. Such tales often feature perplexing and seemingly contradictory characters: a primary example of such a character is Morgan le Fay.

The Legendary King: How the Figure of King Arthur Shaped a National Identity and the Field of Archaeology in Britain

Drawing from archaeological evidence, historic, and current sources, we can understand King Arthur’s role as a symbol of Britain, which has affected the narrative of Tintagel Castle as the birthplace of King Arthur.

Chretien de Troyes and Arthurian Romance in the Development of the Tournament

How did the joust as an event come to replace the tournament proper? The relationship between art and life is of a cyclical nature, meaning that it does not stop with art’s imitation of life, but continues with the roles reversed. This was the relationship between Chretien de Troyes and the medieval nobility.

Love, Freedom, and Marital Fidelity in Malory’s Morte Darthur

If we examine closely Malory’s representation of courtship and marriage — a sphere of human activity within knightly society where men’s and women’s interests and activities converge — we will realize that he is not at all “misogynistic.”

Medievalists at the Movies: King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword premiered May 2017 MAN CANDY ALERT! When I sat down to watch “King Arthur” over this past weekend, I was a bit apprehensive. This big-budget, big-name feature film didn’t last very long in theaters (never a good sign) and it received overall negative reviews (typically, not always, not a […]

The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, Issue 9) : The Magic of King Arthur

In this issue: A Man for All Centuries: The Changing Myth of King Arthur, Guy Ritchie’s King Arthur comes to the big screen!, Medieval Minded with author Guy Gavriel Kay, Books: Harold: The King Who Fell at Hastings, Travel: A hidden medieval garden in Southern France

Letters from the Otherworld: Arthur and Henry II in Stephen of Rouen’s Draco Normannicus

The poem Draco Normannicus includes a correspondence between King Arthur, now ruler of the Antipodes, and Henry II.

Book Excerpt: Warriors and Kings The 1500-Year Battle For Celtic Britain by Martin Wall

For those of you looking for something Celtic to read this spring, author Martin Wall brings us Warriors and Kings: The 1500-Year Battle for Celtic Britain.

The Story of the Grail

The Story of the Grail has captivated people for hundreds of years. How is it that a story first written in the 12th century can still be so meaningful in the 21st?

Did Medieval People Believe in King Arthur?

By Danièle Cybulskie If you’ve ever had your doubts that King Arthur was a real, living, breathing human being at some point, you’re not alone. Despite the many, many histories that “prove” that Arthur was definitely this or that – tenacious Briton, Roman military man, leader of hunky Sarmatians – the evidence is pretty thin. […]

Daughter of Destiny, by Nicole Evelina

Before queenship and Camelot, Guinevere was a priestess of Avalon. She loved another before Arthur, a warrior who would one day betray her.

Reclaiming Guinevere for the 21st Century

It’s my hope that as women continue to claim their power in modern society, they will learn from Guinevere’s mistakes, emulate her strengths, and claim her as the heroine and role model she should be.

The Lady’s Man: Gawain as Lover in Middle English Literature

Gawain’s reputation as a philanderer precedes him; the best known example is the comment of Bertilak’s wife in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, whose disbelief that the famous and courteous Gawain could be alone with her and not crave a kiss is notorious

In Search of Guinevere

As a lifelong lover of Arthurian stories, I have always had a love/hate relationship with Guinevere. In some stories, she is the well-mannered and generous ideal queen; in others she is a jealous and spiteful adulteress. How can she be both? When did she change?

Celtic Mythology in the Arthurian Legend

The aim of this thesis is to find out whether there are some aspects, themes or symbols of the pagan Celtic mythology that appear in the Arthurian legend and if so, what role they play there and to what extent they influence the legend.

Hair and Masculinity in the Alliterative Morte Arthure

This essay examines the use of forced hair cutting in the late fourteenth‐century alliterative romance, Morte Arthure, to show how it is used to develop characters that reflect the tension surrounding the English king Richard II and the tyranny that characterized the final years of his reign.

Secret Gestures and Silent Revelations: The Disclosure of Secrets in Selected Arthurian Illuminated Manuscripts and Arthurian Films

This paper explores visual language and iconic systems central to the representation of the Arthurian cycle in thirteenth and fifteenth century Gothic illuminated manuscripts and in two Arthurian films; its focus is the theme of courtly love and crucial revelations of the secret or hidden.

Malory’s Arthur and the Politics of Chivalry

The jury is back and the verdict is in. In Thomas Malory’s Le Morte Darthur, a major reason the Round Table falls is that its political apparatus and the chivalric ethos in which that apparatus is grounded are inadequate for maintaining a stable kingdom.

Five Ways Gawain Kicks Lancelot’s Ass

Here are five ways in which Gawain shows Lancelot who’s boss!

Magna Carta Conference Offers New Insights Into The 800-year-old Document

Magna Carta just celebrated its 800th birthday this past Monday. In honour of this incredible milestone, King’s College London, and the Magna Carta Project, hosted a 3 day conference dedicated to this historic document.

The Medieval Sleeping Beauty

I’ve since read an early version of the Sleeping Beauty story from the actual fourteenth century, and it’s much darker than the modern version, although it does hold an interesting secret for those who love the stories of the Round Table.

Genre Medievalisms: Geek Goes Chic!

Is Cersei a collection of bad medieval stereotypes? Have nerds gone mainstream? Were American cowboys a modern retelling of the medieval knight? Put down that comic, put away your bag of dice, and indulge your inner nerd.

Courtly Magic in the Middle Ages

The possibility of the everyday use of magic by courtiers is emphasized by the employment of magic advisors and, very frequently, astrologists. The medieval court was a place for the elite, and thus the educated sector of society at this time.

Epic (and Not-So-Epic) Names from Mallory

Looking for a name for your avatar? Look no further! Everyone knows Lancelot and Gawain, but here are some lesser-known names from one of my favourite books: Thomas Mallory’s Le Morte D’Arthur.

Merlin: The Medieval Embodiment of Overcoming the Devil

Merlin, child of a demon and pious woman, first appears in late twelfth century literature and develops uncanny prophetic abilities and unnatural powers rooted in his supernatural heritage, transforming him into a mysterious figure empowered by knowledge and cloaked in dichotomies resulting from his mixed parentage.

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