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The Four Portraits of Het‘um II: New Observations Regarding the Royal Portrait of the Lectionary of 1286

The subject of this paper is one of the most mysterious characters in the history of the Armenian kingdom of Cilicia – King Het’um II – and his four surviving portraits.

Evoking Tales in a Medieval Ceiling: Sulayman’s / Solomon’s Birds in the Capella Palatina of Palermo

A great multitude of birds populate the painted ceilings sheltering the palatine chapel of Palermo, constructed for King Roger of Sicily; these birds appear to shelter and rest in the great ceiling. As ceilings were often made to represent the sky, thee pictorial associations of birds and ceilings is only logical.

Color in the Middle Ages

Here are five colorful facts about color in the Middle Ages, courtesy the research of French historian Michel Pastoureau.

The Drosten Stone, St Vigeans: A cultural hybrid

The inscriptions on the Drosten Stone have inspired extensive scholarship, but little study has been devoted to the possible meanings behind the Pictish art depicted on the stone.

Woven Words in the Lindisfarne Gospels

This dissertation investigates the meanings and function of the five ornamental pages that decorate the Lindisfarne Gospels, a Gospel book produced in the British Isles, most likely in the Isle of Lindisfarne, around 720 CE.

Rock, Paper, Chisel, 3D Printer: Teaching Medieval Art with Technology

Teaching medieval art requires an invocation of students’ imaginations. The majority of the art we study has been decontextualized, removed from the portal, altar, or window for which it was made.

How Much Do You Know About Leonardo da Vinci?

Leonardo da Vinci’s “lost” painting, Salvator Mundi recently sold for a record breaking 450 million dollars! How much do you really know about the famous Renaissance man? Take this quiz to find out!

Exhibition of Medieval Manuscripts Opening at the Art Institute of Chicago

From January 27-May 28, 2018, the Art Institute of Chicago will present a collection of manuscript illuminations spanning four hundred years of the Middle Ages and early Renaissance from countries across Western Europe.

The Battle of Culloden in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery – Part 2: The Battle and Aftermath

This lady’s story is one of courage and Jacobite patriotism; without her, the Prince may never succeed in making his voyage to Skye, which inspired the folk song quoted in the beginning.

The Battle of Culloden in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery – Part 1: Prelude

When day dawned on April 16th, 1746, what would be the final pitched battle on the British soil took place on the field of Culloden near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands.

The Inverse Perspective in Byzantine Painting

The inverse perspective is a method of representing spatial depth used only in Byzantine painting. It is different from Renaissance perspective. The inverse perspective, with two-dimensional axonometric representations, is more complex, offering multiple possibilities of symbolization.

Beard Pulling in Medieval Christian Art: Various Interpretations of a Scene

Christian iconography contains a lot of subjects with unclear interpretation. More difficult are the cases where unclear subjects could have several possible interpretations. That is the case of the scene where one man is pulling out the beard of another one.

Herod the Great in Medieval Art and Literature

This thesis follows the treatment of Herod the Great in the art and literature of 1500 years, concentrating especially on the iconographic detail and distinctive literary developments of this paradoxical king of the Jews.

How the Pope’s rhino drowned and was immortalised in art history

The story of one of the most infamous gifts, and one of the most influential images in art history, has been brought back to life thanks to research at the University of Warwick.

More Witches, Monsters, Beasties: A Day at the National Gallery with the London Drawing Group

Part 2 of Minjie Su’s trip to the National Gallery in London.

Cosmos and Community in Early Medieval Art

Using thrones, tables, mantles, frescoes, and manuscripts, Benjamin Anderson shows how cosmological motifs informed relationships between individuals, especially the ruling elite, and communities.

Witches, Monsters, Beasties: A Day at the National Gallery with the London Drawing Group

Examining five paintings inspired by Greco-Roman myths and medieval lore.

Mindmapping: Diagrams in the Middle Ages – and Beyond

If we think of diagrams as techniques of visualisation that give order to knowledge and perception, then the Middle Ages have a special claim on our attention, because much of its art is diagramatic.

Schematizing Plum Blossoms: Understanding Printed Images in Thirteenth-Century China

This thesis examines the significance of the printed images in the Register of Plum Blossom Portraits (Meihua xishen pu, d. 1238), the earliest extant book illustrating plum blossoms.

From The Middle Ages to Modern Times: Egg Tempera in Art History

While it’s been utilised as a medium since the Florentine Renaissance, egg tempera never never completely disappeared from western art.

14th-century Japanese artwork comes to the Cleveland Museum of Art

The Cleveland Museum of Art’s recent acquisitions include a 14th-century Japanese hanging scroll featuring the Buddhist deity Aizen Myōō, Wisdom King of Passion. 

The Medieval Magazine No. 99 (Volume 3, No. 16) : The Anniversary Issue!

The Anniversary Issue! Medievalists.net turns 9 this September! This issue will celebrate our favourite things about the Middle Ages from travel, to art, fashion, books and events.

260,000 digitized images of Jewish art and artifacts now online

The Hebrew University’s Center for Jewish Art has launched the world’s largest index of Jewish Art, a collection of more than 260,000 digitized images of Jewish objects and artifacts from all over the world.

Joanna II of Anjou-Durazzo, the Glorious Queen

This short essay reflects on Queen Joanna as a test case of both the difficulties and the potential that always reside in communication and confrontation between disciplines, even when they are as closely related as history and art history.

Christ as Priest in Byzantine church decoration of the 11th and 12th centuries

The 11th century was a watershed in the Byzantine church decoration.

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