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Women as Artists in the Middle Ages

This essay surveys the evidence of women as artists in the Western and Byzantine Middle Ages in the centuries between about 600 and 1400.

The “Mona Lisa” of Medieval Art

While the subject of Da Vinci’s famous Renaissance painting is likely identifiable as Lisa del Giocondo, a.k.a. Lisa Gherardini, her enigmatic expression has captivated generations. Medieval art has its own enigma: the woman featured in the Lady and the Unicorn tapestries. This tapestry set contains some of the most well-known images from medieval art, yet […]

No Strings Attached: Emotional Interaction with Animated Sculptures of Crucified Christ

Such life-size Christs were not just the stuff of dreams (or nightmares), but have existed in Europe throughout the middle ages – massive wooden bodies, from the size of a small adult up to three metres tall, were habitually hung on the crosses above the nave.

Virtual Pilgrimage through the Jerusalem Cityscape

This essay considers a group of images depicting the Passion that are, at one level, quite disparate: they are executed in different media, in vastly different sizes, and with different target audiences.

Local and Global: Medieval Art in an Age of New Nationalisms

In light of recent world events, this talk addresses some of the disciplinary questions about methodology and classification that underlie the study and teaching of medieval art today.

The Noblest of Sports: Falconry in the Middle Ages

The Noblest of Sports: Falconry in the Middle Ages By William H. Forsyth The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, New Series, Vol. 2, No. 9 (1944) Introduction: “Ah, what great pleasure God our Lord conferred on man when He gave him the sport of dogs and birds … and when He willed that beasts and birds […]

Watchful Warriors on Viking-Age Sculpture

Watchful Warriors on Viking-Age Sculpture Lecture by Howard Williams Given at the University College Isle of Man on December 14, 2016 Almost every book about the Vikings includes photographs of warriors found on early medieval carved stones from Britain, Ireland and the Isle of Man. How do we interpret these images? Why were figures with […]

Monstrous Muslims? Depicting Muslims in French Illuminated Manuscripts from 1200-1420

This paper examines depictions of Muslims in illuminated manuscripts produced in France between 1200-1420 that feature images of Christian-Muslim interactions.

The Getty Enchants with Alchemy Exhibits

Long shrouded in secrecy, alchemy was once considered the highest of arts. Straddling art, science, and natural philosophy, alchemy has proven key to both the materiality and creative expression embedded in artistic output, from ancient sculpture and the decorative arts to medieval illumination, and masterpieces in paint, print, and a panoply of media from the European Renaissance to the present day.

The Devil and his Works: the Owl in Hieronymus Bosch (c.1450-1516)

This article will suggest that its presence is much more sinister than that of a wise observer shaking his head as he sees the follies of mankind.

Medieval Mass Media and Minorities

The portrayal and (mis)use of the figure of the Jew and the Muslim in vernacular sermons and wall paintings from medieval Denmark and Sweden.

Petrified Powers: Materials, Forms, and Theories of Medieval Islamic Talismans

Persis Berlekamp is working on Islamic talismans created in the 12th to 15th centuries, focusing on objects from the Seljuk, Mongol and Timurid milieux.

Depictions of Combat in Medieval Art: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Video of a paper given by James Hester at the 2016 IMC

How to Make Medieval Artists’ Tools

by Danièle Cybulskie If there’s one thing medieval people loved, it was writing educational treatises. Sometimes, these were a little on the fantastic side – like bestiaries or travel literature – but other times, they were extremely useful how-to manuals. I particularly love the how-to manuals because they can teach us so much about medieval […]

Negotiating the Sacred: Byzantium, Venice and the True Cross in Late Medieval Venice

Dr. Klein’s lecture about art, faith and politics in late medieval Venice.

Constructing Imaginary Cities in Fifteenth-Century Illumination

In the course of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries the Trojan legend was one of the most popular myths in the European courts, and in the Burgundian court in particular. The legend was depicted in numerous tapestries and illuminated manuscripts.

The Cathedral and the City

Another fantastic talk. Professor Caroline Bruzelius talks to us about medieval art, architecture, and the role of the cathedral in Medieval society.

The Global Side of Medieval at the Getty Centre: Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts

Los Angeles correspondent, Danielle Trynoski takes through the, ‘Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts’ exhibut at the Getty Museum.

Traversing the Globe through Illuminated Manuscripts at The Getty

Traversing the Globe through Illuminated Manuscripts, on view January 26–June 26, 2016 at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center, offers the opportunity to explore the strong connections between Europe and the broader world during the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

The Apotropaic Function of Celtic Knotwork in the Book of Kells

Early Irish ornament very rarely occurs without interlace, in either of its two different varieties, which are the plait and the knot. Such ornamental knotwork and interlace patterns as they appear in the full-page portraits and illustrations of the Book of Kells will be the concrete object of study of the following pages, their possible apotropaic function, their particular focus.

Can You Identify Renaissance Paintings From A Small Detail?

How well do you know these masterpieces?

The Snake Motif in Viking Art: 10­th – 12th Centuries

A guest post by Armstreet on Snake motifs in 10-12th century Viking art

The Use of Fantasy by European Artists from 1250 to 1650 A.D.

This study will trace the development of fantasy in European painting from 1250 to 1650 A.D.

The Wolf-Warrior: Animal Symbolism on Weaponry of the 6th and 7th centuries

Decorative art in Scandinavia during the late Iron Age and Viking Period was largely dominated by animals in stylized forms.

Early Medieval Celtic Art in Britain and Ireland: A Curator’s Perspective

Martin Golberg, Senior Curator at the National Museums of Scotland, travelled to the British Museum to give audiences perspective on the various pieces in the exhibit as well as an introduction to what constitutes “Celtic” art.

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