Digital Humanities at K’zoo: A Recap

Vadstena project photos: Michelle Urberg describes research behind the virtual reconstruction of Vadstena Abbey in Sweden - photo by Danielle Trynoski

DH projects seem to be springing out of the proverbial ground like so many mushrooms over the last few years.

Following the Leader: Erik Kwakkel on How and Why to Be an Online Medievalist

Erik Kwakkel speaking at this year's International Congress on Medieval Studies

One of the best presentations I saw at the International Congress on Medieval Studies this year was by Erik Kwakkel from Leiden University.

The Medieval Magazine (Volume 2 Issue 16)

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This week we start taking looking back at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, with reports on Scott Bruce’s paper ‘Imagining Subterranean People and Places in the Middle Ages’ and Erik Kwakkel speaking about his work in online media. Plus Tintagel Castle, dancing, Marie de France, Krakens and more on Anne of Brittany.

Anne of Brittany, Queen of France

Anne of Brittany - Anna di Bretagna, Latin 9474 - Jean Bourdichon - Grandes Heures d'Anne de Bretagne - f. 3r - Anne de Bretagne entre trois saintes (détail). (Wikipedia).

This week brings us two articles from Susan Abernethy on Anne of Brittany. This first article details Anne’s life.

A Bad Medieval Road Trip

Photo by Loren Kerns / Flickr

Those who have ever suffered similar misfortunes can judge from their own experiences how great my agitation and anxiety were at the moment.

Grief and Spiritual Crisis in the Middle Ages

Death of Ferdinand of Castile - British Library Royal 20 C VII f.11

Existential crises and questions of faith in times of hardship are not modern phenomena. Medieval people routinely questioned their faith, most poignantly when it came to death.

BOOK REVIEW: Medieval Medicine: Its Mysteries and Science by Toni Mount

Medieval Medicine by Toni Mount

Our review of Toni Mount’s fascinating look at medicine in the Middle Ages in – Medieval Medicine: Its Mysteries and Science by Toni Mount.

The Medieval Magazine: Medieval Astrology (Volume 2 Issue 14)

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This week’s issue explores a 15th century astrological text and the practical advice it gives. Read also about cats, Seljuqs, King Arthur, Dante and Viking runestones.

What are the ‘Perilous Days’ of the Year?

Sinking ships - British Library MS Additional 10292   f. 36v

Are you wondering which days it might be best not to get out of bed? In the Middle Ages they wondered that as well, and made use of astrology and signs from the heavens to help them figure this out. A helpful writer from the 15th century even made a list of ‘Perilous Days’

The Cathedral and the City

Chartres Cathedral - photo by Atlant / wikicommons

Another fantastic talk. Professor Caroline Bruzelius talks to us about medieval art, architecture, and the role of the cathedral in Medieval society.

When Bread Grew on Trees

Chestnuts/Flickr

Medieval people ate a lot of bread. A lot. They ate pounds of bread every day, and even used it as plates – or trenchers – which sounds both practical and delicious (although trencher bread was usually stale).

The Medieval Magazine: How to Create Your Own Medieval Costume (Volume 2 Issue 13)

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This week’s issue gives you thrifty advice on looking medieval, and explores the Spanish city of Valencia. Plus, Æthelred the Unready, Vikings, Monastic Gardens and the British Museum.

How Well Do You Know The History of Westeros?

history westeros

You win or you die.

Royalit: What Did Medieval Kings Read?

Great medieval kings

The @5MinMedievalist, Danièle Cybulskie,

Could You Pass Westeros 101?

game of thrones 101

Valar Dohaeris! We shall see!

Can You Identify These Medieval Weapons By Name?

medieval weapons quiz

Do you know the names of each of these different weapons?

The Medieval Magazine: Game of Thrones (Volume 2 Issue 12)

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As a new season of Game of Thrones is set to begin, we take a look at the influence of the Middle Ages on the works by George R.R. Martin.

The Dead in 3D: The Rothwell Charnel Chapel Project Online!

Rothwell Charnel Chapel skulls. (Photo by Medievalists.net)

In the past seven months, the Rothwell Charnel Chapel Project has evolved to become more than just a research and preservation project, but has morphed into a virtual exhibit, and fascinating online learning resource that will be available globally.

The Healing Power of a Garden – A Medieval View

A medieval garden - from British Library MS Royal 6 E IX   f. 15v

When it came to healthy living, medieval people were careful on what they ate. It was commonly believed that foods could offer good (and not-so-good) consequences to the body, but it was hard to remember what ailments a certain food could cure. In steps Henry of Huntingdon to offer us a poetic guide to the healthy and medicinal qualities of what you can find in a garden.

The Ruin: The Past Dreaming of the Past

Stonehenge, Wiltshire, England. Stonehenge, Condado de Wiltshire, Inglaterra, August 12, 2014 (Wikipedia).

Danièle Cybulskie, the @5minMedievalist brings us a piece on Anglo-Saxon poetry.

Lost Works of the Middle Ages

Old Books - photo by David Flores / Flickr

Only a small fraction of the writings created in the Middle Ages have survived to the present day. Throughout the medieval period manuscripts would be destroyed or recycled, and in more recent centuries this process only worsened as fires, theft and neglect led to more losses. Many great works from the Middle Ages have been lost, with little hope that any copies survive. Here are five lost works that we would love to see again.

Conference Round-Up: Sowing the Seeds V: Measuring the Medieval Economy

The Money Changer and his Wife (1490).

On March 31st, I attended the fifth annual Sowing the Seeds: Measuring the Medieval Economy conference at Cambridge University, organised by Jordan Claridge and Alex Brown. It was a full day of discussion about the current research beng done in medieval economics, and a look ahead to the future.

A Journey to the Far North in the Ninth Century

Detail of a map of Scandinavia, created by Abraham Ortelius in the 16th century

The name Ohthere does not usually rank among the great explorers of the Middle Ages, such as Leif Eriksson, Marco Polo and Christopher Columbus. However, his exploits are very impressive, for he would sail into Arctic Circle over eleven hundred years ago.

Five Favourite Middle English Romances

Dante Gabriel Rossetti - Arthur's Tomb: The Last Meeting of Lancelot and Guinevere (1860).

Danièle Cybulskie, the 5MinMedievalist, shares her five favourite Middle English romances – what are yours?

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