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Queen Jadwiga in history and legend: A contribution to the study of the XIV-XV century history of Poland

In spite of its biographic character, this thesis dwells on the various events in the life of the Queen, illustrating essentials of her personality, as well as the posthumous fame which so vividly remained in the tradition, and the present attempts to beatify the Queen.

King Æthelstan in the English, Continental and Scandinavian Traditions of the Tenth to the Thirteenth Centuries

Using close textual analysis, this thesis has identified similarities and differences in the ways in which the Anglo-Saxon king, Æthelstan, is depicted in narrative sources from England, the Continent and Scandinavia during the tenth to the thirteenth centuries

Medieval colophons: A variety of scribal annotations

Though the colophons are not as anarchic as street graffiti tends to be, both can be seen as personal marks. They are examples of people making a note of their existence.

Damaged goods: A photo essay

This essay ultimately shows that while the velvety softness of perfect skin is appealing, getting to know imperfect parchment is in the end more interesting and rewarding for the historian of the medieval book.

Priest as Criminal: Community Regulation of Priests in the Archdeaconry of Paris, 1483-1505

This dissertation examines accusations of criminal behavior levied against priests in the archdeaconry of Paris from 1483 – 1505.

The 
Privileging
 of 
Visio
 over
 Vox 
in
 the 
Mystical
 Experiences
 of
 Hildegard 
of 
Bingen 
and
 Joan
 of
 Arc

Even
 though
 medieval
 women
 mystics
 have
 enjoyed
 increased
 attention
 in
 recent
 scholarly
 discussion, 
a
 topic
 that
 still
 has
 not
 been
 tackled
 is
 the
 possible
 difference
 between
 seeing
 a
 vision
 and
 hearing
 a
 voice
 during
 a
 mystical
 experience
 and
 the
 ramifications
 of
 this
 difference 
in
 the
 context 
of
 medieval
 text 
production
 and 
in
 the
 status
 of
 mystics
 as
 authors.


The Impact of the White Ship Disaster

An in-depth look at the White Ship disaster of 1120 and the impact it had on English succession.

The Vikings in Orkney

In recent years, it has been suggested that the first permanent Scandinavian presence in Orkney was not the result of forcible land-taking by Vikings, but came about instead through gradual penetration

Identification, Geochemical Characterisation and Significance of Bitumen among the Grave Goods of the 7th Century Mound 1 Ship-Burial at Sutton Hoo (Suffolk, UK)

The 7th century ship-burial at Sutton Hoo is famous for the spectacular treasure discovered when it was first excavated in 1939.

A Family of Mercers in Medieval London

A fourteenth century family coordinating elements of English life, the academy, the church, the crown, land, commerce and family connections to become significant participants in London life.

‘As If Augustine Had Said’: Textual Interpretation and Augustinian Ambiguity in a Medieval Debate on Predestination

This paper reevaluates a sample of Hincmar’s writings in the 840s and 850s to argue that he sought to make explicit what Augustine had left unclear regarding predestination by appealing to common standards of orthodoxy in the forms of additional patristic authors, conciliar judgments, and liturgical practices.

The Scapegoat: Impotence and Witchcraft in the Middle Ages

This essay investigates the question of how women were used as scapegoats for male impotence during the Witch Craze.

Monstrous Muslims? Depicting Muslims in French Illuminated Manuscripts from 1200-1420

This paper examines depictions of Muslims in illuminated manuscripts produced in France between 1200-1420 that feature images of Christian-Muslim interactions.

The Concept of a Boundary Between the Latin and the Byzantine Civilizations of Europe

This boundary runs from the Barents Sea in the north to the Adriatic Sea in the south. On its western side nations are associated with the Latin legacy, while on the eastern side are those that relate to the Byzantine tradition and later on, to Moscow.

Joan of Arc’s Ring: A Question of Possession and Cultural Patrimony

To begin to grasp the significance of this object to the French psyche, one must first understand the full import of the Maid of Orleans within the context of French history and culture.

Cats and Dogs: The Development of the Household Pet through Symbolic Interpretations and Social Practices in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

The shifting attitudes and social practices between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in Western Europe fostered the reexamination of the relationship between humans and animals.

Post-Apocalyptic Fiction: A Return to the Medieval

A specific theme in post-apocalyptic science fiction is a return to a new medieval context.

The Alternate Islands: A Chapter in the History of SF, with a Select Bibliography on the SF of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance

Cockayne is a universal folk legend of a land of peace, plenty, and sloth, well known already in Antiquity, and refurbished—probably by vagrant student-poets—in the Middle Ages.

Maps, Travel and Exploration in the Middle Ages: Some Reflections about Anachronism

How were maps conceived in the Middle Ages? Using the words “map”, “travel” and “exploration”, historians must be wary of anachronism.

Good versus Evil: Representations of the Monstrous in Thirteenth Century Anglo-French Apocalypse Manuscripts

This paper examines one of the oldest ideological conflicts of all time: that between the divine powers of good and evil in the Book of Revelation, as represented in thirteenth century Anglo-French apocalypse manuscripts.

The Roots of Fencing from the Twelfth to the Fourteenth Centuries in the French Language Area

This article offers a partial overview on fencing, as recognized through archive records, as well as French epics and romances from the twelfth to the early fourteenth century.

The Twelfth-century documents of St. George’s of Tròccoli (Sicily)

This study publishes for the first time six authentic and original documents from mid-twelfth-century Norman Sicily. Three are bilingual, written in Greek and Arabic, and three are Arabic.

The Role Of Ritual And Ceremonial In The Reign Of Edward I

The following paper will explore occasions of ceremony and ritual linked to King Edward I as an arbiter of royal power, as well as consider the means by which he utilized the influence of his position and the majesty of the monarchy to affirm and reinforce his extensive authority.

Historical rise of waterpower initiated the collapse of salmon stocks

We demonstrate that populations declined by up to 90% during the transitional period between the Early Middle Ages (c. 450–900 AD) and Early Modern Times (c. 1600 AD).

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