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Allegories of Sight: Blinding and Power in Late Anglo-Saxon England

The practical necessity of sight to effective participation in Anglo-Saxon life is reflected in the multifaceted depictions of punitive blinding in late Anglo-Saxon literature.

Muscular Medievalism

Our job as medievalists—as humanists—is not to wall off the Middle Ages from public discourse when it’s being misused or mishandled.

Trees as a Central Theme in Norse Mythology and Culture

The continual theme of trees in Norse Mythology is important to our understanding of the cosmology of Norse Mythology.

The Tenth-Century Collapse in West Francia and the Birth of Christian Holy War

This paper will argue that although these two disruptive changes brought major shifts in European society, and fuelled contemporary millennial anxieties, they were also part of a wider context of greater changes.

The Middle Ages Contributions to Cardiovascular Medicine

The objective of this paper is to describe the knowledge drawn up from the Middle Ages about the cardiovascular system, its understanding and therapeutic approach to cardiologists and cardiovascular surgeons.

Magic and Medicine in a Man’s World: The Medieval Woman as both Healer and Witch

This paper intends to show that a combination of competition and strong medieval gender roles contributed to the tilting of the public perception of women healers from well-respected necessities to witches and charlatans, ultimately leading to the professionalization of medicine.

Literati in the Court of King Afonso III of Portugal (1248-1279)

Literati in the Court of King Afonso III of Portugal (1248-1279) By Armando Norte Royal Studies Journal, Vol.2:1 (2015) Abstract: Throughout the first dynasty, the literati at the service of the Portuguese Crown played an increasingly important role in the assertion of royal power. They can be found serving the royal house as officers, representing […]

Gloriosa Regina or “Alien Queen”? Some Reconsiderations on Anna Yaroslavna’s Queenship (r. 1050-1075)

Gloriosa Regina or “Alien Queen”? Some Reconsiderations on Anna Yaroslavna’s Queenship (r. 1050-1075) By Talia Zajac Royal Studies Journal, Vol.3:1 (2016) Abstract: The article questions the image that has emerged in secondary sources of Anna Yaroslavna (r. 1050- c. 1075), the Rus-born wife of King Henri I of France (d. 1060), as an “alien queen” who remained […]

Before the Kaiser: The Memory of Saladin and the Crusades in the Near East from the Fifteenth to the Nineteenth Centuries

I remember that I am now in a city in which once lived the greatest prince whose name is recorded in history, the valorius hero, whose courage, his elevation and nobility of character and his devotion to his religion was an example in heroism even to his enemies. I refer to the great sultan Saladin of the dynasty of Ayyub when I think of this.

Jewish Law and Litigation in the Secular Courts of the Late Medieval Mediterranean

Although medieval rabbinic law generally forbade Jews from suing their co-religionists in state courts, this practice was widely accepted among some Mediterranean Jewish communities.

Enforcing contracts for Valencian commerce: the institutional foundations of international trade in the first half of the fifteenth century

This paper tries to explore how contract enforcement was handled in the cross-religious environment of late medieval Christian Valencia, Muslim Granada and North Africa, given the fact that each religious community has usually been assumed to apply their own set of rules through their own community courts.

Ælla and the Descendants of Ivar: Politics and Legend in the Viking Age

In March 867 the Northumbrian king Ælla died at York during a battle against the Scandinavian ‘Great Army’. Two years later, further south, the same force dealt a similar end to the ruler of East Anglia.

Basileos Anglorum: a study of the life and reign of King Athelstan of England, 924-939

The reign of Athelstan of England is of central importance to Anglo-Saxon history and has unexpected significance for contemporary continental history.

The Making of a Missionary King: The Medieval Accounts of Olaf Tryggvason and the Conversion of Norway

The following article examines the oldest extant accounts of the conversion of Norway, from the Latin works of the late twelfth century until Snorri Sturluson’s Heimskringla from around 1230.

Unknowing the Middle Ages: How Middle English Poetics Rewrote Literary History

The concept of the unknown captivated medieval theologians, mystics, lovers, and travelers for centuries, and yet literary scholars too readily reduce this topos to a romance trope.

Viking Faroes: Settlement, Paleoeconomy, and Chronology

The paper presents a synopsis of the current evidence for the settlement chronology and Viking Age to Early Medieval paleoeconomy of the Faroe Islands.

What Happened to the Grandsons and Great-grandsons of the House of York?

The Tudors, according to Tudor propaganda, brought an end to 30 years of civil war between the Houses of York and Lancaster, merging the two families through Henry VII’s marriage to Elizabeth of York, the eldest daughter of the Yorkist King Edward IV, the son of Duke Richard.

The Vaults of Santa Maria Novella and the Creation of Florentine Gothic

Historians of Gothic architecture, among them Louis Grodecki, have noted that Santa Maria Novella is one of the most beautiful examples of Italian Gothic without attempting to specify just what it is that sets Santa Maria Novella apart.

The early history of glaucoma: the glaucous eye (800 BC to 1050 AD)

To the ancient Greeks, glaukos occasionally described diseased eyes, but more typically described healthy irides, which were glaucous (light blue, gray, or green).

Blink and You’ll Miss it: Medieval Warfare in Victor Davis Hanson’s Carnage and Culture

To prove his thesis, Hanson analyses nine significant battles fought between “western” and “eastern” armies, broadly construed. These battles, he states, were selected “for what they tell us about culture, specifically the core elements of Western civilization.”

The First Crusade: Pope Urban II and Jerusalem vs. Diplomatic Unification

The First Crusade: Pope Urban II and Jerusalem vs. Diplomatic Unification By Alexandra Wurglics Adelphi Honors College Student Journal of Ideas, Vol.15 (2015) Introduction: Pope Urban II (1088-1099) could not have realized the enormity of his decision to call for the First Crusade. What was initially conceived of as a single, penitential expedition ended up sparking a long […]

Was it for walrus? Viking Age settlement and medieval walrus ivory trade in Iceland and Greenland

The Norse expansion into the North Atlantic is remarkable testimony to the maritime transformation of the early medieval world.

Imperial Electioneering: The Evolution of the Election in the Holy Roman Empire from the Collapse of the Carolingians to the Rise of the Ottonians

This election set the Holy Roman Empire apart from the Carolingian Empire and the rest of Europe. This strange political development would define the Holy Roman Empire and central Europe for centuries to come.

The Attitude Towards Democracy in Medieval Jewish Philosophy

By and large, medieval Jewish philosophers conceived the ideal government to be that of a perfect philosopher-king of the Platonic mold

The Medieval Roots of Democracy

By the late Middle Ages, institutions of self-government, including regional representative institutions, municipal assemblies, and numerous other autonomous units, had come to saturate West European society.

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