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You Only Die Twice? Abbots between Community and Empire: The Cases of Martin of Tours and Benedict of Aniane

This article compares the deaths of two abbots as told by contemporary observers

“The Great Emperor”: A Motif in Procopius of Caesarea’s Wars

When Justinian is described to barbarians as “the great emperor,” this reflects an anxiety about the emergence of post-Roman successor states in the West and a growing determination to pursue imperial reconquest.

Jewish people always On the Move: Jewish Travelers in the Middle Ages

The essential starting point of this study has to do mostly with movements of people in Medieval times throughout the world, but paying special attention to the particular way Jews moved from one place to another in those times.

The Justification of Tyrannicide in the Chronicle of Dalimil. The Czech Nobility as the “Mystical Body” of the Realm

Dating from the early 14th century (1309-1314), the Chronicle of Dalimil reflects the political attitudes of this pivotal period.

The return to hill forts in the Dark Ages: what can this tell us about post-Roman Britain?

After being abandoned for nearly 400 years, some of the ancient Iron Age hill forts were re-occupied and re-fortified in the later fifth and early sixth centuries. Interestingly, some ‘new’ hill forts were also erected at this time.

Monasticism without frontiers : the extended monastic community of the Abbot of Cluny in England and Wales

Cluniac monasteries, so called because of their relationship to the abbot of Cluny in Burgundy, have been estimated to have numbered over seven hundred foundations at one time, distributed throughout France and in England, Wales, Scotland, Lombardy, and Spain.

Man is Not the Only Speaking Animal: Thresholds and Idiom in al-Jāhiz

Furthermore, according to the language of the Arabs, every animal is either eloquent or a foreign-speaker … Man is the eloquent one even if he expresses himself in Persian, Hindi, or Greek.

The Image of the Cumans in Medieval Chronicles

The Cumans who inhabited the Eurasian steppe from the mid-eleventh to thirteenth century and led a nomadic way of life were a Turkic nomadic people, representing the western branch of the Cumans-Qipchak confederation

‘Death in a Dread Place’: Belief, Practice, and Marginality in Norse Greenland, ca. 985-1450

This thesis finds that the development of Christianity was driven by the Greenlanders’ increasing perception of their place in the world as one of marginality and spiritual danger.

Richard III and the Woodville Faction: The Events Surrounding 1483

This paper examines the Usurpation of Richard III in 1483 and the events leading up to it.

Book prices and monetary issues in Renaissance Europe

Was the price expressed in money of account or in coined money? In domestic or foreign currency? Is it possible to relate two prices expressed in different currencies?

The Goat and the Cathedral – Archaeology of Folk Religion in Medieval Turku

This paper introduces three cases of material signs of folk religion that archaeologists have discovered in the medieval soil layers of Turku

Scoundrels, Dogs and Heathens: Christian Mercenaries in the Almohad Caliphate, 1121-1269

This article examines the complex phenomena of the Farfan, a Christian knight serving a Muslim ruler during the religious wars of 13th century Iberia.

Voyagers in the Vault of Heaven: The Phenomenon of Ships in the Sky in Medieval Ireland and Beyond

This paper explores the phenomenon of ships voyaging in the sky. Such fantastical sightings are considered primarily in an early medieval Irish context, but evidence from places as widely separated in time and place as thirteenth-century England and eighteenth-century Canada is also addressed.

Viking invasions, a French failure?

Vikings never interested French Historians. Pagan, illiterate, barbaric, Germanic, everything was despicable in the eyes of the French Historians of the 19th century.

Dress pins from Anglo-Saxon England

This thesis examines the development, production and function of dress pins in Anglo- Saxon England.

The Day the Sun Turned Blue: A Volcanic Eruption in the Early 1460s and Its Possible Climatic Impact—A Natural Disaster Perceived Globally in the Late Middle Ages?

Strange atmospheric phenomena visible all over Europe in September 1465 are interpreted as the result of a volcanic dust veil, possibly originating from a re-dated eruption of Kuwae in Vanuatu, in the southwestern Pacific.

Rómverja saga: an introduction and a translation

Rómverja saga is an Old Icelandic translation of three Latin works on historical themes from the classical period. In this thesis, I provide the first English translation of this little-known text in the hope that it might prove a resource for scholars interested in the reception of Latin literature in the medieval period.

The economy of Norwegian towns c. 1250-1350

The aim of this thesis is to explain why differences arose between Norwegian, Danish and English towns with regard to their economic functions

Echoes of Legend: Magic as the Bridge Between a Pagan Past and a Christian Future in Sir Thomas Malory ‘s Le Morte Darthur

It the goal of this thesis to show how magic and Christianity form a symbiotic relationship in which both are reliant on each other in order to be successful in the medieval romance.

The Female Audience of the Manuscripts of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales

This thesis finds evidence that women used the manuscripts of the Canterbury Tales in an informal way, and the books were potentially kept in close proximity at home.

Survival to amputation in pre-antibiotic era: a case study from a Longobard necropolis (6th-8th centuries AD)

This is a remarkable example in which an older male survived the loss of a forelimb in pre-antibiotic era.

Hveiti ok Hunang: Viking Age Icelandic Mead?

This paper will try and draw out the picture of mead in Viking Age Iceland, a picture worth elaborating on due to the importance of Icelandic sources of information for an even larger culture.

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