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Miracle Children: Medieval Hagiography and Childhood Imperfection

Medieval miracle narratives, written to promote the posthumous miraculous activities of saints from their shrines, document the stories of pilgrims seeking intercessory aid.

The Quennells and the ‘History of Everyday Life’ in England, c. 1918–69

The Quennells and the ‘History of Everyday Life’ in England, c. 1918–69 By Laura Carter History Workshop Journal, Issue 81 (2016) Introduction: A new social history developed in mid twentieth-century England, one that has seldom been taken seriously by historiographers of social history. The ‘history of everyday life’ involved disparate threads that are challenging to weave […]

Irish and British saints of the early medieval period

Irish saints tend to be studied en masse.

Early Irish history: the state of the art

Early Irish studies should be engaging with three distinct audiences: these are made up of scholars within the field, medievalists outside of it and the interested public.

Bites and stings: A medieval perspective

Venomous creatures and their poisons loom large in the medieval medical European imagination.

Raising infanta Catalina de Aragón to be Catherine Queen of England

My aim in this study is to focus on queenship, particularly the formative years before 1509 when she was learning to be a queen.

Catapults are not Atomic Bombs: Towards a Redefinition of Effectiveness in Premodern Military Technology

Since at least the sixteenth century most historians have believed that the longbow significantly changed English strategy and tactics in the later Middle Ages.

Rodulf and Ubba: In Search of a Frisian–Danish Viking

This article attempts to reconstruct some of Rodulf’s life and deeds.

Leprosy and Plague in St Giles in the Fields

Author and historian, Rebecca Rideal, on leprosy in London during the Middles Ages and Early Modern period.

Environmental Scarcity and Abundance in Medieval Icelandic Literature

Can medieval literary texts tell us anything about the environmental conditions and the availability of natural resources in premodern times?

Visions in a Ninth-Century Village: an Early Medieval Microhistory

This article however suggests that an account of a ninth-century peasant’s vision can be read to recover a microhistory of a rural priest in northern Francia, and draws out the implications for how the local societies of the period might be viewed.

A Garden Enclosed, A Fountain Sealed Up: Paradoxical and Generative Metaphors of Enclosure in Medieval Female Anchoritism

The anchoritic life was a particular manifestation of the secluded or eremitical life.

Old Food was Never Better: Augmenting event authenticity at a medieval festival

Initially, an exploratory ethnographic study was conducted at a pre-festival medieval banquet to explore dimensions of food and beverage apparent in the literature. This informed a resultant survey which was administered at the festival tournament.

Both “illness and temptation of the enemy”: melancholy, the medieval patient and the writings of King Duarte of Portugal (r. 1433–38)

Recent historians have rehabilitated King Duarte of Portugal, previously maligned and neglected, as an astute ruler and philosopher. There is still a tendency, however, to view Duarte as a depressive or a hypochondriac, due to his own description of his melancholy in his advice book, the Loyal Counselor.

Henry II and Ganelon

Henry II and Ganelon By Paul R. Hyams Syracuse Scholar, Vol.4:1 (1983) Introduction: Once upon a time, there was a king of Nantes, called Equitan, a good and courteous ruler, filled with a proper enthusiasm for princely things: Equitan had a seneschal, a good knight, brave and loyal, who took care of his land for him, […]

The Soldier’s Life: Early Byzantine Masculinity and the Manliness of War

The Soldier’s Life: Early Byzantine Masculinity and the Manliness of War By Michael Stewart Byzantina Σymmeikta, Vol. 26 (2016) Introduction: The ancient Romans admired the characteristics that they believed allowed them to establish hegemony over their rivals. It comes as little surprise then that the hyper-masculine qualities of the Roman soldier became the standard by which […]

‘Better off dead than disfigured’? The challenges of facial injury in the premodern past

This paper argues that facial disfigurement has been neglected in the historiography of medieval Europe, and suggests some reasons for this oversight before examining the evidence from legal and narrative texts.

Thoughts on the Role of Cavalry in Medieval Warfare

Thoughts on the Role of Cavalry in Medieval Warfare By Jack Gassmann Acta Periodica Duellatorum, Vol.2 (2014) Abstract: This article explores the role of cavalry in medieval warfare starting with it’s origins in the Carolingian age, examining how cavalry was used as a strategic asset within the context of the period on at an operational […]

The gargoyles of San Francisco : medievalist architecture in Northern California 1900-1940

This thesis examines the development from the novel perspective of medievalism—the study of the Middle Ages as an imaginative construct in western society after their actual demise.

From Heroic Legend to ‘Medieval Screwball Comedy’? The Origins, Development and Interpretation of the Maiden-King Narrative

New types of popular texts emerged, bringing with them new images of women, especially the maiden-king or meykongr, a figure that features prominently in many of the late-medieval indigenous romances or (frumsamdar) riddarasögur.

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