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Isabel of Aragon (d. 1336): Model Queen or Model Saint?

This study of Isabel of Aragon (c. 1270–1336), wife of King Dinis of Portugal (1279–1325), who was venerated as a saint from shortly after her death, aims to explore the relationship between Isabel’s queenship and her sainthood.

Moses as a Role Model in the Serbian Charters after 1371: Changing Patterns

The aspects of the Old Testament figure of Moses highlighted in the charters of post-Nemanjić Serbia, or under the Lazarević and Branković dynasties (1371– 1459), testify to a changed attitude towards Old Testament role models.

A millennium of Belgrade (Sixth-Sixteenth centuries): A Short Overview

This paper gives an overview of the history of Belgrade from the reign of Justinian I (527–565), i.e. the time of Slavic settlement, to the Ottoman conquest in 1521.

No Strings Attached: Emotional Interaction with Animated Sculptures of Crucified Christ

Such life-size Christs were not just the stuff of dreams (or nightmares), but have existed in Europe throughout the middle ages – massive wooden bodies, from the size of a small adult up to three metres tall, were habitually hung on the crosses above the nave.

Private Passions: The Contemplation of Suffering in Medieval Affective Devotions

This dissertation examines the representation of suffering in medieval affective devotional texts.

A Wealth of Evidence: The Identity of the Man Commemorated at Sutton Hoo

Was it a wealthy merchant, a warrior from overseas, or a great king? This paper gathers, presents, and scrutinizes the evidence and arguments from ancient records, opulate grave-goods, and contemporary investigations in an attempt to determine the most likely candidate for the individual interred in Mound 1 at Sutton Hoo.

The Resurrection of Jesus and Human Beings in Medieval Christian and Jewish Theology and Polemical Literature

This article will first look at intra-religious discussion among medieval Christians and Jews about resurrection in general to see how they understood it theologically in their respective religious communities.

Virtual Pilgrimage through the Jerusalem Cityscape

This essay considers a group of images depicting the Passion that are, at one level, quite disparate: they are executed in different media, in vastly different sizes, and with different target audiences.

Gregory of Tours, the Eastern Emperor, and Merovingian Gaul

This article explores Gregory’s passages on imperial Rome and argues that they were intended to highlight the virtues and vices of particular Merovingian kings in comparison with particular Roman emperors.

The Needle is Mightier than the Sword: The Effect of Embroidery in Medieval War Material Culture

Beginning in the early Middle Ages, military garments evolved from simple identifying clothing with little ornamentation, to richly decorated garments that reflected the increasingly complex – and somewhat artificial – heraldic composites.

The Armor Network: Medieval Prostheses and Degenerative Posthuman Bodies

By studying depictions of armor in The Canterbury Tales, Le Morte D’Arthur, and The Faerie Queene, and by seeing how these works help us understand the use of medievalism in digital media, we can unravel how armored bodies in Western cultural narratives function as a way to think through the problematics of posthuman transformations.

Pain in Medieval and Modern Contexts

The interplay between Christian religious belief and medicine in the High Middle Ages was complicated.

Divine Vengeance and Human Justice in The Wendish Crusade of 1147

In this study I will focus on the question of whether the Wendish Crusade supports an ‘act of vengeance’ paradigm.

The Oxford map of Palestine in the work of Matthew Paris

He was long-winded, opinionated, cranky, and interested in everything. He moves from politics at court, to the abuses of ecclesiastical power, to foreign relations, to peculiar meteorological and astronomical occurrences, to uncanny incidents.

Friends, Vassals or Foes: Relations and their representations between Frisians and Scandinavians in the Viking Age

‘We paid a visit to the lads of Frisia. And we it was who split the spoils of battle among us.’ – So reads the runic inscription on a silver Viking Age neck-ring found in Senja, Troms County in northern Norway, which is dated to c. 1025.

Miracle Children: Medieval Hagiography and Childhood Imperfection

Medieval miracle narratives, written to promote the posthumous miraculous activities of saints from their shrines, document the stories of pilgrims seeking intercessory aid.

The Quennells and the ‘History of Everyday Life’ in England, c. 1918–69

The Quennells and the ‘History of Everyday Life’ in England, c. 1918–69 By Laura Carter History Workshop Journal, Issue 81 (2016) Introduction: A new social history developed in mid twentieth-century England, one that has seldom been taken seriously by historiographers of social history. The ‘history of everyday life’ involved disparate threads that are challenging to weave […]

Irish and British saints of the early medieval period

Irish saints tend to be studied en masse.

Early Irish history: the state of the art

Early Irish studies should be engaging with three distinct audiences: these are made up of scholars within the field, medievalists outside of it and the interested public.

Bites and stings: A medieval perspective

Venomous creatures and their poisons loom large in the medieval medical European imagination.

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