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Breaking Down Barriers: Eunuchs in Italy and North Africa, 400-625

This paper considers how attitudes towards to imperial eunuchs as military leaders changed in parallel in both Greek and Latin texts from the 4th to 7th centuries, and the key role played by Justinian’s eunuch generals Solomon and Narses.

Love and Lust in Later Medieval England: Exploring Powerful Emotions and Power Dynamics in Disputed Marriage Cases

Depositions from matrimonial litigation are a compellingly, if deceptively, vivid source for the words, sentiments and circumstances surrounding courtship and marriage making.

Hamlet with the Princes of Denmark: An exploration of the case of Hálfdan, ‘king of the Danes’

This article explores the case of one ‘Prince of Denmark’ called Hálfdan, ‘king of the Danes’. His life, as best we can reconstruct it, reveals much that is of great significance for our understanding of the Viking Age, not only in England but in Denmark and the Frankish realm as well.

Hunger and the Clerical Canine: The Dog as Metaphor in Piers Plowman B

Hunger in Piers Plowman B is a controversial and perplexing figure in passus 6, one that has garnered considerable and remarkably divergent critical attention over the years.

Dialect in the Viking-Age Scandinavian diaspora: the evidence of medieval minor names.

This thesis aims to investigate the Scandinavian contribution to medieval microtoponymic vocabulary in two areas of northwest England, and it attempts to clarify what Scandinavian-derived place-name elements in minor names can tell us.

Chretien de Troyes and Arthurian Romance in the Development of the Tournament

How did the joust as an event come to replace the tournament proper? The relationship between art and life is of a cyclical nature, meaning that it does not stop with art’s imitation of life, but continues with the roles reversed. This was the relationship between Chretien de Troyes and the medieval nobility.

Tournaments, Jousts and Duels: Formal Combats in England and France, circa 1380 – 1440.

During the period circa 1380-1440, knights and men-at-arms in England and France engaged in armed combat in a range of different contexts. One of these contexts was in formal combats, which included jousts, judicial duels, and foot combats.

Whether a True Christian May Wage War: Hussite Polemics About Just War

Hussite warfare and ideology have been the subject of detailed reflection for nearly two hundred years now. They have represented different nations, attitudes and methodologies.

Wild to domestic and back again: the dynamics of fallow deer management in medieval England

The medieval fashion for parks transformed the English landscape: it is estimated that by 1300 AD over 3000 had been established, covering about 2% of the total area of countryside

Catalan commerce in the late Middle Ages

In this article I shall examine the maritime commercial activities of Catalans abroad.

East meets West: Mounted Encounters in Early and High Mediaeval Europe

By the Late Middle Ages, mounted troops – cavalry in the form of knights – are established as the dominant battlefield arm in North-Western Europe.

Starvation Under Carolingian Rule. The Famine of 779 and the Annales Regni Francorum

How vulnerable was the Frankish society to famines in the Early Middle Ages?

The Medieval Magazine No. 99 (Volume 3, No. 16) : The Anniversary Issue!

The Anniversary Issue! Medievalists.net turns 9 this September! This issue will celebrate our favourite things about the Middle Ages from travel, to art, fashion, books and events.

The Hobbit and Other Fiction by J. R. R. Tolkien: Their Roots in Medieval Heroic Literature and Language

The body of this study presents the results of a survey of certain major medieval works in English, Norse, Irish, Welsh, French, German, and Italian, particularly those alluded to in Tolkien’s published scholarship and those suggested as possible sources in reviews of Tolkien’s fiction

A female Viking warrior confirmed by genomics

Already in the early middle ages, there were narratives about fierce female Vikings fighting alongside men. Although, continuously reoccurring in art as well as in poetry, the women warriors have generally been dismissed as mythological phenomena.

Matthias Corvinus and Charles the Bold

The paper investigates the diplomatic relations of Matthias Corvinus with the Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, focusing on the 1460s and ‘70s.

Why We Can’t Stop Fighting about Chaucer’s Man of Law

Why We Can’t Stop Fighting about Chaucer’s Man of Law By Bonnie J. Erwin Enarratio: Publications of the Medieval Association of the Midwest, Volume 20 (2016) Introduction: As Chaucer’s Canterbury pilgrims compete in their Host’s tale-telling challenge, they bicker and mock one another, form both alliances and rivalries, and critique one another’s religiosity, gender performance, and social […]

The Meaning of the Habit: Religious Orders, Dress and Identity, 1215-1650

What lies at the core of this analysis of the conceptions about religious clothing – used as a heuristic tool – is precisely its capacity to show not only how the identities of the religious orders of the period evolved, but also how they were perceived and conceived, and how they shaped these changes.

The Medieval Quiet Period

The Medieval Quiet Period By Raymond S Bradley, Heinz Wanner and Henry F. Diaz The Holocene, Vol 26, Issue 6 (2016) Abstract: For several centuries in early Medieval times the climate system was relatively unperturbed by natural forcing factors, resulting in a unique period of climate stability. We argue that this represents a reference state for the […]

Surrender in Medieval Europe: An Indirect Approach

The demise of slavery meant that for the first time women and children came to be regarded as non-combatants, and high-status warriors treated as a source of profit (ransom).

Horses for work and horses for war: the divergent horse market in late medieval England

Rivaled perhaps only by the medieval knight, horses evoke some of the most familiar images associated with England in the Middle Ages.

An Assessment of the ‘Sweating Sickness’ Affecting England During the Tudor Dynasty

This strange disease, known variously as “sweating sickness,” Sudor anglicus, or simply the “Sweat” occurred almost exclusively in England and only during the first half of the Tudor dynasty, seemingly vanishing in 1551.

‘Greek fire’ revisited: current and recent research

The first point to make is that it seems now widely agreed that liquid fire was, in fact, a petroleum-based weapon, and had no connection whatsoever with explosive materials or mixtures,

Decline or Transformation? Archaeology and the Late Medieval ‘Urban Decline’ in Southern England

Decline or Transformation? Archaeology and the Late Medieval ‘Urban Decline’ in Southern England By Ben Jervis Archaeological Journal, Vol.174:1 (2017) Abstract: Archaeological evidence is used to examine how urban life changed in the later medieval towns of Sussex, Surrey, and Hampshire in southern England, in light of ongoing debates about the existence of a fifteenth-century urban […]

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