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How did the Merovingian Kings wear their hair?

We must accept, I think, that the Franks, like all Germans, attached a particular importance to the hair

Eleanor of Aquitaine: A Queen and A Mother

The mere mention of Eleanor of Aquitaine brings to mind an remarkable woman in many respects.

Henry V and the crossing to France: reconstructing naval operations for the Agincourt campaign, 1415

On 11 August 1415 a large fleet slipped out of the Solent and headed to the Chef de Caux.

Verba vana: empty words in Ricardian London

Verba vana: empty words in Ricardian London By Robert Ellis PhD Dissertation, Queen Mary, University of London, 2012 Abstract: Verba Vana, or ‘empty words’, are named as among the defining features of London by a late fourteenth-century Anglo-Latin poem which itemises the properties of seven English cities. This thesis examines the implications of this description; […]

Women’s Medicine and Female Embodiment in the Morte Darthur, a Middle English Trotula Treatise, and The Mists of Avalon

In this essay, I will read the Morte Darthur alongside the Middle English Trotula treatise, a fifteenth-century gynecological handbook, and Marion Zimmer Bradley’s The Mists of Avalon, a twentieth-century fantasy adaptation of the Arthurian legend.

Birds of the Mongol Empire

The Mongol Empire, the largest contiguous empire the world has ever known, had, among other things, a goodly number of falconers, poultry raisers, birdcatchers, cooks, and other experts on various aspects of birding.

The Idea of World Domination in the Public Consciousness in Europe in the Early and Developed Middle Ages

The article explores a public thought and public consciousness in the early and developed Middle Ages in Europe.

The Affects of Warfare Upon Trade: Growth in a War-Torn World, Northern Europe 1000-1700

By requiring rulers to raise new revenue streams, warfare forced them to bargain for new resources. This bargaining granted concessions to cities and merchants, in the form of city charters and monopolies, which encouraged trade and therefore increased the economic well-being of the affected states.

Popular Culture and Royal Propaganda in Norway and Iceland in the 13th century

Do the kings presented in Strengleikar appear as the European Christian rex justus kings, which was the dominant medieval royal model, or do they convey another image – an image that may be interpreted to explain both the intended function and the popularity of the translations in Norway and Iceland

Death of a Renaissance Record-Keeper: The Murder of Tomasso da Tortona in Ferrara, 1385

Beginning with a description of the murder of an Italian record-keeper at the hands of an angry mob in the late fourteenth century, this essay explores the historical background of official records destruction during the Renaissance

The Lack of a Western European Military Response to the Ottoman Invasions of Eastern Europe from Nicopolis (1396) to Mohacs (1526)

On 25 September 1396, on the plains south of the central Bulgarian city of Nicopolis, a battle was fought.

The personality of Guibert de Nogent reconsidered

Uncertainty over Guibert’s reasons for writing his autobiography, the De vita sua, has prompted attempts at psycho-historical analyses of his personality.

The Oneiromancy of Laxdæla saga: A Psychoanalytic interpretation of the dreams of Laxdæla saga

In medieval literature dreams were used in abundance, with many different visionary sources and outcomes, and the medieval Icelandic sagas show this same tendency.

Letters from the Otherworld: Arthur and Henry II in Stephen of Rouen’s Draco Normannicus

The poem Draco Normannicus includes a correspondence between King Arthur, now ruler of the Antipodes, and Henry II.

Women as Artists in the Middle Ages

This essay surveys the evidence of women as artists in the Western and Byzantine Middle Ages in the centuries between about 600 and 1400.

Traditio vel Aemulatio? The Singing Contest of Samarra, Expression of a Medieval Culture of Competition

The rivalry between two famous female singers was the topic of the day in al-Mutawakkil’s (r. 847–61) Samarra, according to the Kitab al-aghani.

Past and Present in Mid-Byzantine Chronicles: Change in Narrative Technique and the Transmission of Knowledge

Particular emphasis will be placed on the Chronicle of Theophanes the Confessor and the Chronicle of Symeon the Logothete.

A Wolfish Reflection: A Literary Analysis of the Werewolf Story in ‘The King’s Mirror’

Why has the werewolf story been selected? How should it be read and understood?

The Ostrogothic Military

This chapter explores the place of the army and military organisation within the Ostrogothic kingdom.

The Historiography of Crisis: Jordanes, Cassiodorus and Justinian in mid sixth-century Constantinople

This article presents a new interpretation of the historiographical production of Jordanes by situating it in the political and social environment of Constantinople of the years 550-552.

The Mongol Invasion of Croatia and Serbia in 1242

The Mongol invasion of Croatia and Serbia constitutes a single, albeit extremely interesting, episode in the great western campaign of 1236-1242, so meticulously planned and executed by the armies of Batu, grandson of Chingis Khan and founder of the “Golden Horde”.

Say What I am Called: A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Self-Referential Inscriptions

This thesis compiles a working corpus of Anglo-Saxon self-referential inscribed artifacts to examine how the inscriptions and supports utilize self-reference to push the viewer to understand the social and cultural significance of such objects.

Isabel of Aragon (d. 1336): Model Queen or Model Saint?

This study of Isabel of Aragon (c. 1270–1336), wife of King Dinis of Portugal (1279–1325), who was venerated as a saint from shortly after her death, aims to explore the relationship between Isabel’s queenship and her sainthood.

Moses as a Role Model in the Serbian Charters after 1371: Changing Patterns

The aspects of the Old Testament figure of Moses highlighted in the charters of post-Nemanjić Serbia, or under the Lazarević and Branković dynasties (1371– 1459), testify to a changed attitude towards Old Testament role models.

A millennium of Belgrade (Sixth-Sixteenth centuries): A Short Overview

This paper gives an overview of the history of Belgrade from the reign of Justinian I (527–565), i.e. the time of Slavic settlement, to the Ottoman conquest in 1521.

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