Advertisement

Canterbury Roll now available online

In New Zealand, University of Canterbury staff and students are working to translate and digitise a unique medieval manuscript to make it accessible to the world.

New Year, New You: Early Modern Style

While many people may be making new year’s resolutions to get fitter in 2018, Natalie Anderson takes a look at the early modern obsession with achieving the same goal hundreds of years ago.

Medieval Manuscripts: Epiphany in The Great Hours of Anne of Brittany

The Great Hours of Anne of Brittany is undoubtedly a masterpiece of French painting, as is fitting for a manuscript intended for someone who was twice queen of France: with Charles VIII and then Louis XII.

Wood Culture and Technology in the Greenland Norse Society, 10th-15th Century

Despite a relatively poor wooded environment, well preserved archaeological collections show timbers were often used, suggesting Norse people in Greenland found multiple ways to acquire the wood they needed.

Aspects and Problems of the Templars’ Religious Presence in Medieval Europe from the Twelfth to the Early Fourteenth Century

What has been neglected in the debate on military order religion is a more focused discussion of how the religion of individual military orders was understood and experienced by outsiders through the ecclesiastical property these orders possessed and the devotional spaces they created and maintained.

Well-Behaved Women Rarely Make History: Eleanor of Aquitaine’s Political Career and Its Significance to Noblewomen

Eleanor of Aquitaine played an indirect role in the formation of medieval and early modern Europe through her resources, wit, and royal connections.

A Provençal Holy Land. Re-reading the Legend and the Sites of Mary Magdalene in Southern France

From the twelfth century onwards, various sites in Provence became associated with Mary Magdalene and her family, creating a pilgrimage “land” for those who wanted to see and experience their post-biblical lives.

Dracontius and the Wider World: Cultural and Intellectual Interconnectedness in Late Fifth-Century Vandal North Africa

The traditional image of Vandal North Africa as a place of oppression has largely been shattered under the weight of modern scholarly investigation. In recent years, scholars from various fields have come together to greatly enhance our understanding of Vandal North Africa.

How Waterford won its Civic Sword: the battle of Ballymacaw

The battle of Ballymacaw is known from two accounts, both compiled at the end of the sixteenth and beginning of the seventeenth centuries.

Climate of Doubt: A re-evaluation of Büntgen and Di Cosmo’s environmental hypothesis for the Mongol withdrawal from Hungary, 1242 CE

Büntgen and Di Cosmo’s recent article in Scientific Reports attempts to tackle an important historical mystery (the abrupt Mongol withdrawal from medieval Hungary). We agree with their underlying assumption that an interdisciplinary analysis of environmental and documentary resources can result in a better understanding of the events. However, some of the supporting evidence does not withstand critical examination in the context of the Mongol invasion of Hungary.

Free Trade and Free Movement of People: diplomacy and material culture in the early and high Middle Ages

There is a wealth of material relating to diplomatic gifts. However, beyond this aspect, and a few references about trade in treaties and links to this in coinage, surprisingly little has been written about material culture and diplomatic  practice.

Multilingualism and Empires: Byzantium and Sasanian Persia

The long and bitter confrontation between Byzantium and the Sasanian Empire was one of the most important historical phenomena of Late Antiquity; it was also very significant for the development of later mediaeval societies and institutions in East and West.

Some Highlights of Education in Christian Spain the Late Medieval Period

In this article we will tour some of the major educational milestones of late medieval Spain, including the primary and secondary education at that time, especially in the educational activity of the Church, the councils and individuals.

The Conservation History, Problems and the Rehabilitation of Lithuanian Medieval Castles

The paper discusses the conservation practices and methods of the Lithuanian medieval castles. Since 19th century there was a lot of attention on the medieval castles in Lithuania, which later transformed into a search for an identity.

Medieval Iceland, Greenland, and the New Human Condition: A case study in integrated environmental humanities

By interlinking analyses of historically grounded literature with archaeological studies and environmental science, valuable new perspectives can emerge on how these past societies may have understood and coped with environmental impacts.

Reading the Exeter Book Riddles as Life-Writing

The recent explosion of interest in the theory and practice of ‘life-writing’ provides a valuable new opportunity to reassess these texts with new critical tools at hand.

Medieval sunken buildings in the North of France: from samples to micro-features

Thirty years of development of preventative archaeology in France have permitted a renewal of the research into the early medieval period.

Remembrance of things past: recreating the lost world of medieval pilgrimage to St Thomas Becket in Canterbury

This paper discusses the Centre for the Study of Christianity & Culture’s recently completed a three-year AHRC funded research project, ‘Pilgrimage and England’s Cathedrals, past and present’.

Anti-Clericalism in Medieval Persian Poetry

The dominant attitude of the anti-clerical rhetoric in Persian poetry is permeated by criticism of judges, lawyers, aesthetics, spiritual advisors, and authority figures of that nature. This is one of the reasons that makes this poetry still relevant.

Medieval friary where Richard III was buried to be protected

The remains of a 13th century monastic site, Greyfriars in Leicester, which was the burial place of King Richard III, has been granted protection by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on the advice of Historic England.

Ruins of 8th century monument discovered in Mongolia

A joint excavation team from Osaka University and the Institute of History and Archaeology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences discovered the ruins of a unique monument surrounded by 14 large stone pillars with Turkic Runic inscriptions.

How the Pope’s rhino drowned and was immortalised in art history

The story of one of the most infamous gifts, and one of the most influential images in art history, has been brought back to life thanks to research at the University of Warwick.

The Anglo-Norman Vegetius: a thirteenth century translation of the “De re militari”

The De re militari of Flavius Vegetius Renatus was written and compiled towards the close of the fourth century. Dedicated to the reigning Emperor, the work is a military treatise describing the training, organization, tactics and strategy of the Roman army.

The Deeds of William of Villehardouin: An Annotated Translation of a Part of the Medieval Work, La Chronique de Morée

This thesis provides a translation of a portion of La Chronique de Morée, one of the remaining French texts from a period just following the Fourth Crusade (1202-1204).

The Ilkhanid Mongols, the Christian Armenians, and the Islamic Mamluks: a study of their relations, 1220-1335

This work seeks to fill a gap in the academic literature concerning the study of the Ilkhanid Mongols of the Middle East during the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries CE using Armenian, Persian, Arabic, and Syriac primary sources in English translation.

medievalverse magazine