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Identification, Geochemical Characterisation and Significance of Bitumen among the Grave Goods of the 7th Century Mound 1 Ship-Burial at Sutton Hoo (Suffolk, UK)

The 7th century ship-burial at Sutton Hoo is famous for the spectacular treasure discovered when it was first excavated in 1939.

A Family of Mercers in Medieval London

A fourteenth century family coordinating elements of English life, the academy, the church, the crown, land, commerce and family connections to become significant participants in London life.

‘As If Augustine Had Said’: Textual Interpretation and Augustinian Ambiguity in a Medieval Debate on Predestination

This paper reevaluates a sample of Hincmar’s writings in the 840s and 850s to argue that he sought to make explicit what Augustine had left unclear regarding predestination by appealing to common standards of orthodoxy in the forms of additional patristic authors, conciliar judgments, and liturgical practices.

The Scapegoat: Impotence and Witchcraft in the Middle Ages

This essay investigates the question of how women were used as scapegoats for male impotence during the Witch Craze.

Monstrous Muslims? Depicting Muslims in French Illuminated Manuscripts from 1200-1420

This paper examines depictions of Muslims in illuminated manuscripts produced in France between 1200-1420 that feature images of Christian-Muslim interactions.

13th century skeleton discovered with oldest known form of maternal infection

By Michelle Donovan The 800-year-old skeleton of a young woman buried in a graveyard on the outskirts of the fabled city of Troy is yielding new insights into the evolution of bacterial infections and maternal health. Researchers at the University of McMaster’s Ancient DNA Centre and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have sequenced the complete genomes […]

The Concept of a Boundary Between the Latin and the Byzantine Civilizations of Europe

This boundary runs from the Barents Sea in the north to the Adriatic Sea in the south. On its western side nations are associated with the Latin legacy, while on the eastern side are those that relate to the Byzantine tradition and later on, to Moscow.

The Medieval Magazine: #Engaging the Medieval (Volume 3 Issue 1)

New Year, New You? Kicking off the first issue of 2017 with a look at how we as historians, scholars and the general public, engage with history.

Joan of Arc’s Ring: A Question of Possession and Cultural Patrimony

To begin to grasp the significance of this object to the French psyche, one must first understand the full import of the Maid of Orleans within the context of French history and culture.

Cats and Dogs: The Development of the Household Pet through Symbolic Interpretations and Social Practices in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

The shifting attitudes and social practices between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in Western Europe fostered the reexamination of the relationship between humans and animals.

Post-Apocalyptic Fiction: A Return to the Medieval

A specific theme in post-apocalyptic science fiction is a return to a new medieval context.

The Alternate Islands: A Chapter in the History of SF, with a Select Bibliography on the SF of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance

Cockayne is a universal folk legend of a land of peace, plenty, and sloth, well known already in Antiquity, and refurbished—probably by vagrant student-poets—in the Middle Ages.

Understanding Castle Rushen

Castle Rushen has been at the heart of Manx history, politics and life for over 800 years and has changed radically over time as its purpose and context has altered. It is surely the most important structure on the Island.

Maps, Travel and Exploration in the Middle Ages: Some Reflections about Anachronism

How were maps conceived in the Middle Ages? Using the words “map”, “travel” and “exploration”, historians must be wary of anachronism.

Good versus Evil: Representations of the Monstrous in Thirteenth Century Anglo-French Apocalypse Manuscripts

This paper examines one of the oldest ideological conflicts of all time: that between the divine powers of good and evil in the Book of Revelation, as represented in thirteenth century Anglo-French apocalypse manuscripts.

Medieval Big Bang Theory: An Interdisciplinary Tale

In his De luce (on light) he extends it to the origin of the Universe in what has been referred to as the ‘Medieval Big Bang’.

The Roots of Fencing from the Twelfth to the Fourteenth Centuries in the French Language Area

This article offers a partial overview on fencing, as recognized through archive records, as well as French epics and romances from the twelfth to the early fourteenth century.

The Twelfth-century documents of St. George’s of Tròccoli (Sicily)

This study publishes for the first time six authentic and original documents from mid-twelfth-century Norman Sicily. Three are bilingual, written in Greek and Arabic, and three are Arabic.

Top 10 Medieval News Stories of 2016

These last twelve months have seen more discoveries and great research about the Middle Ages. However, in keeping with the theme that 2016 is the worst year ever, our most important story is a depressing tale for medievalists.

The Role Of Ritual And Ceremonial In The Reign Of Edward I

The following paper will explore occasions of ceremony and ritual linked to King Edward I as an arbiter of royal power, as well as consider the means by which he utilized the influence of his position and the majesty of the monarchy to affirm and reinforce his extensive authority.

A Vision of Baby Jesus from 1344

The story told by Margaretha Ebner is a fascinating one – an intimate experience with the Baby Jesus. In her own words, she describes powerful visions of being with the infant, and even breastfeeding him.

The Medieval Magazine: A Medieval Christmas (Volume 2 Issue 31)

Happy holidays from Medievalists.net! Medieval holiday traditions, the story of how Nicholas became Santa Claus, and some tasty treats for your holiday feast. As it gets chilly outside, we’ve also got a few articles connecting medieval studies with climate change too! Inside this issue: From Ale to Wassail: Lady Matilda’s Guide to Surviving a Medieval […]

How to Party Like It’s 1399

The holiday season is upon us once again, which means that it’s time to get medieval and party like there’s no fifteenth century!

Historical rise of waterpower initiated the collapse of salmon stocks

We demonstrate that populations declined by up to 90% during the transitional period between the Early Middle Ages (c. 450–900 AD) and Early Modern Times (c. 1600 AD).

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