Researchers discover a ‘Little Ice Age’ in the 6th century

Summer temperatures were reconstructed from tree rings in the Russian Altai (red) and the European Alps (blue). Horizontal bars, shadings and stars refer to major plague outbreaks, rising and falling empires, large-scale human migrations, and political turmoil.  Image by Past Global Changes International Project Office

‘This was the most dramatic cooling in the Northern Hemisphere in the past 2000 years.’

Flood-hit Medieval Guildhall to reopen for JORVIK Viking Festival

Flooded Undercroft at York’s Merchant Adventurers’ Hall - photo courtesy The York Company of Merchant Adventurers

York’s Merchant Adventurers’ Hall, which was badly affected by the Boxing Day floods in the city, is to reopen to the public in time for the 32nd JORVIK Viking Festival. The ground floor of the Medieval Guildhall including the Undercroft and Chapel were under a metre of water just over six weeks ago and a […]

The Medieval Magazine: Love and Marriage (Volume 2 Issue 2)

medieval mag 54

Love and Marriage is the theme of this week’s issue, as we take a look at love-letters from the 12th-century, and defining marriage in the 13th. Read about the dangers of weddings in Italy, and the possibility of mixed-religious unions in Poland.

The Vikings, their worms, and the diseases they got

Photo by Charles Starrett / Flickr

The Vikings and people of the Norse world would have been predisposed to emphysema and other lung conditions, according to a paper published last week in Nature: Scientific Reports.

Medieval Universities: Privileged, Distinctive and Embedded

medieval university teaching

This lecture will introduce medieval universities from their beginnings in England, France and Italy and on to the Renaissance

Functions of Chess in Medieval French Literature

Functions of Chess in Medieval French Literature

Edward Mills examines the functions of the game of chess in medieval French literary culture.

The Noisy Middle Ages

Hieronymus Bosch, detail from Christ Carrying the Cross

Let’s take five minutes to lend the Middle Ages an ear.

Almost a Millennium, by Jeanbill

Almost a Millennium

Almost a Millennium, by Jeanbill, is an eclectic novel about the unlikely connection between an English monk and an American physician that lived nearly 1,000 years apart, one of today and one in the medieval period.

Creating a crusader saint: Canute Lavard and others of that ilk

Canute Lavard (died 1131), Danish prince and saint. Medieval painting in the church of Vigersted, Denmark. Photographer: Fredrik Tersmeden, Lund, Sweden (2002)

In the Middle Ages, saints were invoked before great, decisive battles, they sometimes participated directly themselves, and they did so more and more often after the eleventh and especially the twelfth century.

Digital Media and Medieval Studies Workshop at the International Medieval Congress

Created by Alexis Wilke / Wikimedia Commons

We at Medievalists.net are proud to announce that we will be delivering a workshop at the 2016 International Medieval Congress

Saladin and the Problem of the Counter-Crusade in Medieval Europe

19th-century depiction of a victorious Saladin, by Gustave Doré.

The phrase Counter-Crusade is, obviously, a modern construct, but in 1144 the military situation in Syria did drastically change.

Support Structures in Crusading Armies, 1095-1241

Battle between the Turks and the Crusaders  - The Hague, KB, KA 20 fol. 254v

This thesis will examine the support structures in crusading armies from the First Crusade, launched in 1095, to the end of the Barons’ Crusade, in 1241.

The Medieval Magazine: The First Crusade (Volume 2 Issue 1)

medieval mag 53

For our one-year anniversary issue we focus on the First Crusade, and ask were Christians and Muslims allies during this event? The answer might surprise you. We have more about the First Crusade, including interviews with two historians that specialize in the topic.

BOOK REVIEW: Grendel’s Mother: The Saga of the Wyrd-Wife by Susan Signe Morrison

Books: Grendel's Mother by Susan Signe Morrison.

Grendel’s Mother tells the story of Brimhild, a child found abandoned in a boat on the shores of Denmark. Taken in by a fisherwoman woman and her husband, she is received as a blessing for the child they recently lost. There is nothing to identify her save for a few strange, and foreign items packed […]

If it Thunders in February…

Thunder Storm Clouds - photo by Per / Flickr

If you hear thunder in February, it could mean bountiful crops are coming, or war and death will come down upon the wealthy. Here is your day-to-day guide on thunder from the sixth century.

Civic Knighthood in the Early Renaissance: Leonardo Bruni’s De militia (ca. 1420)

Statue ofe Francesco Ferrucci (1489-1530), Florentine condottiere

Leonardo Bruni’s aim in the De militia (ca. 1420) was to co-opt the most glamorous of medieval ideals, the ideal of chivalry, and to reinterpret it in terms of Greco-Roman ideals of military service.

Sir Gawain Gets an 80s Reboot: The Sword of the Valiant Movie Review

Oh that hair! Miles O'Keefe rocking a He-Man, metal band hair do, in the 1984 reboot of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight in, 'The Sword of the Valiant'

This week, we have the retelling of the epic Arthurian romance of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight in this 1984 fantasy reboot.

Five Things Medieval People Would Hate About the Modern World

Portrait of a Man by Albrecht Durer

Although a medieval person vacationing in the twenty-first century would no doubt be overjoyed at things like electricity, modern transportation, and flushing toilets, there are a lot of things they probably wouldn’t appreciate about our time.

Berserkir: a re-examination of the phenomenon in literature and life

Iron helmet from a Vendel era (550-793 AD) boat grave in Vendel, Uppland, Sweden. Displayed at the Museum of History in Stockholm. Photo by Mararie  / Wikimedia Commons

This thesis discusses whether berserkir really went berserk.

Good Dog/Bad Dog: Dogs in Medieval Religious Polemics

Four Dogs before a Doghouse;  Ms. Ludwig XV 1, fol. 50v. - Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program

From its positive attributes, the dog became a Christian symbol for conscientious prelates and preachers who guarded the community from the devil and applied the dog’s curative properties to heal the community of sin.

medievalverse magazine