Advertisement

Top 10 Most Brutal Medieval Deaths

When being broken on the wheel is not enough! Ten brutal ways to die from the Middle Ages.

Medieval Islamic Thought and the ‘What is X?’ Question

Medieval Islamic Thought and the “What is X?” Question By Thérèse-Anne Druart American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, Vol.73:1 (1999) Introduction: In his early dialogues Plato presents a Socrates who goes around raising the famous “what is x?” question and receiving no satisfactory answer. In the case of Medieval Islamic Thought the raising of the “what is x?” […]

The sex-selective impact of the Black Death and recurring plagues in the Southern Netherlands, 1349-1450

We present a newly compiled database of mortality information taken from mortmain records in Hainaut, Belgium, in the period 1349-1450, which not only is an important new source of information on medieval mortality, but also allows for sex-disaggregation.

White, Black and Grey: recent discoveries at Aberdeen’s medieval friaries

Recent excavations at Robert Gordon’s College in Aberdeen have revealed 30 burials from the medieval Dominican (Black) friary as well as hints at remains of the buildings. This talk will present the latest evidence from this site and look at the other excavated medieval friaries, Franciscan (Grey) and Carmelite (white).

Legal Arguments: The Medieval Origin of a European Invention

What do we mean as we say that ‘During the Middle Ages Roman Law became the shared common law of Europe’?

Medieval Medicine for Modern Infections

Recent scholarship may show that there is more methodology to the medicines of medieval practitioners and further inquiry may show that their medicines were more than just placebos or palliative aids but actual antibiotics being used long before the advent of modern infection control.

Pilgrim and patron: Cnut in post-conquest historical writing

This article examines a number of short narratives from the late eleventh and early twelfth centuries which relate to the activities of Cnut as king of England.

St Augustine’s Abbey recreated digitally

St Augustine’s Abbey – part of Canterbury’s World Heritage site – has been ‘rebuilt’ in virtual reality as part of a ground-breaking collaboration between English Heritage and the University of Kent.

The Medieval History of the Pantheon

One of the great landmarks of ancient Rome is the Pantheon. Built around the year 126 AD by emperor Hadrian, it initially served as a temple to all gods. However, in the Early Middle Ages the Pantheon would be repurposed.

Heads, shoulders, knees and toes: Injury and death in Anglo-Scottish combat, c.1296-c.1403

For all that has been written about this period, little, however, has been produced regarding the realities of war, the impact that it had on the individual soldier, or the wounds suffered by those who engaged in these conflicts.

The Evil That Kings Do: Kingship, Tyranny and William I in Hugo Falcandus

A study of the presentation of William I of Sicily in the work of the pseudo – Hugo Falcandus, with particular attention to the author’s views on the entirety of the Hauteville dynasty and kingship in Sicily through the lens of his reign.

How to Murder a Byzantine Emperor

Three tales of murder from the Byzantine court.

The Medieval History of Stonehenge

How was Stonehenge perceived in the Middle Ages? Was it simply abandoned to the passage of time?

New Medieval Books: Historical Fiction, Part 2

Five more new historical fiction novels…

Nine Things You Didn’t Know Were Medieval

From vegetarian meat substitutes to beach parties – find out what came from the Middle Ages!

Medieval Dog Tricks

Can your dog dig up rings, dance to music, or tell if a lady is pregnant? Find out what strange tricks dogs could perform in the Middle Ages.

The many faces of Duchess Matilda: matronage, motherhood and mediation in the twelfth century

In this book I argue that the varied visual and textual source material related to Matilda (1156-1189) provides an insight into her duties and responsibilities at her husband’s court.

Frail or hale: Skeletal frailty indices in Medieval London skeletons

The representative nonmonastic, or lay, community in Medieval London comprises samples from Guildhall Yard (1140–1350 CE), Spital Square (1200–1500 CE), St. Mary Graces (1350–1538 CE), and St. Benet Sherehog (1250–1666 CE).

New Medieval Books: Historical Fiction

Escape this summer to the Middle Ages with these five historical fiction novels…

Tips on being a good CEO from a medieval abbot

In many ways, Abbot Samson would resemble the Chief Executive Officer of a company – indeed, he was actually running a corporation that would have been worth tens of millions of pounds in today’s money

Brewing Viking beer — with stones

There’s nothing archaeologists like better than piles of centuries-old rubbish. Ancient bones and stones from trash heaps can tell complex stories. And in central Norway, at least, the story seems to be that Vikings and their descendants brewed beer by tossing hot rocks into wooden kettles

Pillaging Public Perceptions: Finding Your Career as a Medievalist

The story of how I made the jump from trained academic to designing coloring books

Enviable Possessions: The Thirteenth-Century Gemellions of Limoges

One of the most common images of ritual hand-washing in the medieval period depicts the Gospel account of the Roman procurator Pontius Pilate washing his hands after condemning Jesus to death.

A Dynasty of Saints

By all accounts, St. Æthelthryth was married twice and remained a virgin. During her life she was a princess of East Anglia, queen of Northumbria, and finally abbess and founder of the monastery at Ely.

medievalverse magazine