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Castle for Sale in Germany: Schochwitz Castle

This stunning castle dates from the 15th century, and has been carefully renovated with conservation of many of the original elements.

Women as Artists in the Middle Ages

This essay surveys the evidence of women as artists in the Western and Byzantine Middle Ages in the centuries between about 600 and 1400.

Traditio vel Aemulatio? The Singing Contest of Samarra, Expression of a Medieval Culture of Competition

The rivalry between two famous female singers was the topic of the day in al-Mutawakkil’s (r. 847–61) Samarra, according to the Kitab al-aghani.

Past and Present in Mid-Byzantine Chronicles: Change in Narrative Technique and the Transmission of Knowledge

Particular emphasis will be placed on the Chronicle of Theophanes the Confessor and the Chronicle of Symeon the Logothete.

A Wolfish Reflection: A Literary Analysis of the Werewolf Story in ‘The King’s Mirror’

Why has the werewolf story been selected? How should it be read and understood?

The Ostrogothic Military

This chapter explores the place of the army and military organisation within the Ostrogothic kingdom.

New Medieval Books: From Bastards to Conquerors

Five new books that look at the powerful and the despised in the Middle Ages.

Seven Things You Didn’t Know About Medieval Dragons

Why were dragons so popular—and what was a dragon in the Middle Ages, anyway? Here are a few things you might not know about medieval dragons

Medieval priest buried 700 years ago may have been a victim of the Great Famine, archaeologists report

The remains of Richard de W’Peton, a medieval priest who died 700 years ago – on 17 April 1317 – have been uncovered in an elaborate grave.

Imagining the Past: Interplay between literary and visual imagery in late medieval France

Her research examines the relationships between text and image in vernacular late medieval French manuscripts.

Medieval Sources of Sovereignty: The Idea of Supreme Authority in Quanto Personam and its Glosses

Pope Innocent III’s decretal Quanto personam, issued on 21 August 1198, makes a number of claims regarding the locus, source and character of supreme authority within the Church.

Leprosy victim buried 900 years ago offers insights into how the disease spread through medieval Europe

Medieval leprosy victim in English cemetery was likely a religious pilgrim, possibly from overseas

The Historiography of Crisis: Jordanes, Cassiodorus and Justinian in mid sixth-century Constantinople

This article presents a new interpretation of the historiographical production of Jordanes by situating it in the political and social environment of Constantinople of the years 550-552.

The Mongol Invasion of Croatia and Serbia in 1242

The Mongol invasion of Croatia and Serbia constitutes a single, albeit extremely interesting, episode in the great western campaign of 1236-1242, so meticulously planned and executed by the armies of Batu, grandson of Chingis Khan and founder of the “Golden Horde”.

Say What I am Called: A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Self-Referential Inscriptions

This thesis compiles a working corpus of Anglo-Saxon self-referential inscribed artifacts to examine how the inscriptions and supports utilize self-reference to push the viewer to understand the social and cultural significance of such objects.

Isabel of Aragon (d. 1336): Model Queen or Model Saint?

This study of Isabel of Aragon (c. 1270–1336), wife of King Dinis of Portugal (1279–1325), who was venerated as a saint from shortly after her death, aims to explore the relationship between Isabel’s queenship and her sainthood.

Moses as a Role Model in the Serbian Charters after 1371: Changing Patterns

The aspects of the Old Testament figure of Moses highlighted in the charters of post-Nemanjić Serbia, or under the Lazarević and Branković dynasties (1371– 1459), testify to a changed attitude towards Old Testament role models.

A millennium of Belgrade (Sixth-Sixteenth centuries): A Short Overview

This paper gives an overview of the history of Belgrade from the reign of Justinian I (527–565), i.e. the time of Slavic settlement, to the Ottoman conquest in 1521.

Medieval Hazing: Freshmen Orientation in the Middle Ages

Anchoresses and beguines simply do not get drunk, break into lecture rooms…and play tennis. Yet this was a recurring problem at the University of Paris.

Medieval Archery at The Royal Garrison

We’re trying out medieval archery at The Royal Garrison in Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

Medieval Fun: Joking about the Church in the Middle Ages

Were medieval people funny? Could they tell a good joke? Check out these stories from Poggio Bracciolini and see if you will laugh!

Researchers bring Old Norse language back to JORVIK Viking Centre

Old Norse has been brought back to life by researchers at the University of York through the voices of new animatronic Viking characters at the world-famous JORVIK Viking Centre.

The Sights, Sounds and Smells of the Vikings are back in York

The long-awaited re-opening of the JORVIK Viking Centre in York took place early this week among much fanfare. The well-known medieval attraction is again having visitors immerse
themselves in experiencing the sights, sounds and smells of a Viking-age city.

Merchants’ Marks in Medieval English Books

Merchants’ marks were used initially as a tool of commerce, on consignments of goods, in the Middle Ages.

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