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Archives for August 2011

The Importance of the Belt in Religious and Secular Medieval Courtly Love Literature

Three stories from this time period focus on a sort of courtly love relationship between two people that involves this characteristic giving of a gift: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Guigemar, and an apocryphal account of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary into heaven by “John the Evangelist”. These seemingly different stories share one unifying bond: a belt.

Birgitta of Sweden and the Divine Mysteries of Motherhood

Birgitta of Sweden and the Divine Mysteries of Motherhood Stjerna, Kirsi Feminist Forum, 24, no. 1 (1997) Abstract St. Birgitta of Sweden is most widely known as the founder of her order Regula Sanctissimi Saluatoris and as the “author” of the Revelaciones S. Birgittae, the collection of her 700 revelations. Born in 1303 to one […]

Motte and Bailey Castle in England to go on sale at auction

The remains of a Norman motte and bailey castle will be sold at auction next month, and is expected to fetch between £25,000 and £30,000. Driffield Castle on Moot Hill, located in East Yorkshire, sits on a private property of just over two acres near town of Driffield. It will be sold at an auction […]

Perceptions of beauty in Renaissance art

The depiction of beauty in Renaissance art is shown to be more complex than a mere photograph-like representation of sexuality or of a person’s physical appearance.

Female Wage-Earners in Late Fourteenth-Century England

Historians are becoming increasingly aware of the role played by women in the economy of medieval England

A Norfolk gentlewoman and Lydgatian patronage: Lady Sibylle Boys and her cultural environment

A Norfolk gentlewoman and Lydgatian patronage: Lady Sibylle Boys and her cultural environment Bale, A. Medium Aevum, 78(2), (2009) Abstract The poetry of John Lydgate (c.1370–1449/50) is often discussed in terms of the poet’s illustrious and powerful patrons: literary commissions for royal figures such as Henry V (Troy Book), Henry VI (numerous mummings and pageant poems), […]

Fashioning the Middle Ages: Teaching Medieval Culture Through Clothing

The first hurdle is to make sure students accept that these are clothes, not costumes. Despite how odd some medieval fashions look to modern eyes, people in the past wore this clothing every day, found it comfortable, reasonable, and lovely, and were able to accomplish what they needed to while wearing it.

A social analysis of Viking jewellery from Iceland

This thesis is original in attempting to decipher the social messages conveyed in jewellery.

Medieval Schools: Roman Britain to Renaissance England

Medieval Schools: Roman Britain to Renaissance England By Nicholas Orme Yale University Press, 2006 ISBN: 9780300111026 Publisher’s Synopsis: Children have gone to school in England since Roman times. By the end of the middle ages there were hundreds of schools, supporting a highly literate society. This book traces their history from the Romans to the Renaissance, […]

Researchers discover original bacteria of the Black Death

The bacteria responsible for causing the 1348 Black Death, identified as one of the most cataclysmic events in human history, has been identified by researchers from Canada and Germany. Using a novel method of DNA enrichment coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing, Hendrik Poinar, an evolutionary geneticist from the McMaster University and Johannes Krause of the […]

“An Unhappy Knight”: The Diffusion and Bastardization of Mordred in Arthurian Legends from Select Works of the Sixth through the Fifteenth Centuries

“An Unhappy Knight”: The Diffusion and Bastardization of Mordred in Arthurian Legends from Select Works of the Sixth through the Fifteenth Centuries By Emerson Richards University of Florida: Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume 10, Issue 3 (2010) Introduction: From the earliest incarnations of Arthurian legend, the figure of Mordred was a constant. His character has […]

Mealtime in monasteries: the culture of the Byzantine refectory

Mealtime in monasteries: the culture of the Byzantine refectory By Alice-Mary Talbot Eat, Drink and be Merry (Luke 12: 19): Food and Wine in Byzantium, edited by L. Brubaker, K. Linardou (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007) Introduction: This study will outline some of the ritual practices associated with mealtime in monasteries, the dietary regulations that reflected the […]

Astronomy and Compotus at Oxford University in the Early Thirteenth Century: The Works of Robert Grosseteste

Astronomy and Compotus at Oxford University in the Early Thirteenth Century: The Works of Robert Grosseteste Dowd, Matthew F. PhD Philosophy Thesis, University of Notre Dame, June (2003) Abstract This dissertation examines two works of Robert Grosseteste (c. 1169-1253), his astronomical textbook, the De spera, and his computistical work, the Compotus correctorius. Through the use […]

Teaching the Canterbury Tales in American High Schools

Despite formidable obstacles, teachers have developed creative and effective ways to engage students with Chaucer’s texts.

The Appearance of Lighthouses on Portolan Charts: 1300-1600 AD

The Appearance of Lighthouses on Portolan Charts: 1300-1600 AD By Kevin Sheehan North and South, East and West: Movements in the Medieval World: Proceedings of the 2nd Postgraduate Conference of the Institute for Medieval Research, University of Nottingham, 30-31 May 2009, edited by Judith Mills and Marjolein Stern (2009) Introduction: Seafaring is the life-blood of the […]

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