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Archives for October 2010

True Barbarians?: The Role Of Visigothic Iberia In Medieval Persecutory Discourse

True Barbarians?: The Role Of Visigothic Iberia In Medieval Persecutory Discourse By Justin T. Dellinger Master’s Thesis, University of Texas at Arlington, 2010 Introduction: During the last twenty-five years, there has been wide-spread debate about the extent of the notion of persecution in medieval Europe. Those who believe that persecution existed deliberate to what extent, […]

“The End Followed In No Long Time”: Byzantine Diplomacy And The Decline In Relations With The West from 962 to 1204

This study will examine these examples in the context of diplomacy between Byzantium and Western European powers, explaining how a breakdown in diplomacy affected every facet of the East-West relationship, creating the conditions in which the Fourth Crusade’s diversion to Constantinople was possible.

How Effective Was the Longbow, and What Damage Did it Do?

A debate between Kelly DeVries and Clifford Rogers about the medieval weapon known as the longbow.

Just what medieval movies need – Zombies

Amber Entertainment and 2000 AD, a British comic book company, have agreed to develop a feature film based upon the graphic novel Stronghold, which features zombies terrorizing medieval Wales. According to Varierty.com production will begin by next year, and will be directed by Jason Kingsley and adapted to the screen by writer Tom Fickling. Jason Kingsley, a […]

Witches and «bitches»: genderised laughter in medieval comic tales

During this period, it is possible to differentiate two kinds of witches, in the geographical context of England and Continental Europe: the English popular archetypal witch; and the Continental demonic witch.

Repentant soul or walking corpse? Debatable apparitions in Medieval England

This paper examines two sets of medieval English narratives describing encounters with ghosts, those by William of Newburgh and those in a manuscript from Byland Abbey

Dracula: From Historical Voievod To Vampire Prince

Vlad Dracula was a fifteenth century historical prince in Wallachia, a part of modern day Romania.

From Greek myth to medieval witches: infertile women as monstrous and evil

From Greek myth to medieval witches: infertile women as monstrous and evil McGuire, Linda Interdisciplinary.net Abstract In 1484, Pope Innocent VIII issued a papal bull declaring “witches” as heretics. Shortly after the idea of a witch became gender-related to women and the stereotype of a witch that of an elderly and dangerous woman. The exact […]

Law and the (Un)dead: medieval models for understanding the hauntings in Eyrbyggja saga

Eyrbyggja saga alone, then, presents modern readers with at least three possible conceptions of the revenant’s nature.

Dean’s Eye Window – the reconstruction of a medieval rose window at Lincoln Cathedral

Dean’s Eye Window – the reconstruction of a medieval rose window at Lincoln Cathedral By Geoff Clifton and Gary Willis The Structural Engineer (2007) Introduction: The first Norman Cathedral in Lincoln was built between 1072 and 1092; this building was partially reconstructed from 1141 after a fire, but was then severely damaged in an earthquake […]

The Late Birth of a Flat Earth

In his chronologies, Bede sought to order the events of Christian history, but the primary motive and purpose of his calculations centered on a different, and persistently vexatious, problem in ecclesiastical timing—the reckoning of Easter.

Studies on the structure of Gothic Cathedrals

Studies on the structure of Gothic Cathedrals By Pere Roca Historical Constructions, edited by P.B. Lourenço and P. Roca (Guimarães, 2001) Abstract: The study of three Gothic Cathedrals is presented with a discussion on the results obtained with regard to their structural features and present condition. The paper focuses on the significant difficulties that the analysts […]

Berserker: a ferocious Viking warrior

Berserker: a ferocious Viking warrior By Christie Ward Published Online Introduction: The modern popular conception of the Viking warrior is one of a murderous savage, clad in animal skins, howling in battle. This conception probably owes more to literary tradition than to historical fact: it reflects not the ordinary Scandinavian warriors, but rather a special […]

Finding Traces of the Princes of Gwynedd

Open Days have been organised in the Welsh village of Abergwyngregyn to show findings made during digging into the medieval history of the Princes of Gwynedd. The work is the result of a partnership between the local community’s Aber Heritage Valley Partnership, Snowdonia National Park Authority and Gwynedd Archaeological Trust with financial support from Cadw. Its […]

The Concept of Courtly Love as an Impediment to the Understanding of Medieval Texts

I have never been convinced that there was any such thing as what is usually called courtly love during the Middle Ages. However, it is obvious that courtly love does exist in modern scholarship and criticism, and that the idea appeals to a great many people today.

Hosting Dynasties and Faiths: Chronicling the Religious History Of a Medieval Moroccan Oasis City

Hosting Dynasties and Faiths: Chronicling the Religious History Of a Medieval Moroccan Oasis City By Robert Caverly MA Thesis, Villanova University, 2008 Introduction: Writing a history of an ancient society is a process that calls on both the specificity of individuated events and the broad, sweeping currents of greater change. Similarly, a religious history is […]

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela and the Supporting Travel Network

I would like to consider here how a Roman hamlet such as Santiago de Compostela turned into one of three major holy places in Middle Ages, what historical significance the legends of Santo Jacob had, what motives moved many pilgrims to travel to Santiago de Compostela, what were ages, sexes, jobs and classes of pilgrims, and what communicative means and what travel network were used by medieval pilgrims.

Intellectual Networks of Humanists at the Councils of Constance and Basel in the 15th Century

Intellectual Networks of Humanists at the Councils of Constance and Basel in the 15th Century By Takashi Jinno The Communications and Networks of Medieval Cities in the West: The Sixth Japanese-Korean Symposium on Medieval History of Europe (2007) Introduction: The vivid interests in the classical works of Greek and Latin authorities were revived in the […]

“Treachery in the Remotest Territories of Scotland:” Northern Resistance to the Canmore Dynasty, 1130-1230

This paper argues that not only were many of the uprisings carefully timed and orchestrated predatory strikes against the Scottish kings in their weakest moments, but also that careful reexamination of these insurrections is crucial to our understanding of key issues in the history of twelfth-century Scotland.

The Romagna campaign of 1494: a significant military encounter

The Romagna campaign of 1494: a significant military encounter By Cecil H. Clough The French Descent into Renaissance Italy 1494-95: Antecedents and Effects, edited by David Abulafia (Ashgate, 1995) Introduction: In Baldassare Castiglione’s The Book of the Courtier (the second draft transcribed 1520-21, as in the final version), it was given to Count Ludovico Canossa to stress […]

Warfare and Society in the Carolingian Ostmark

Warfare and Society in the Carolingian Ostmark By Charles R. Bowlus Austrian History Yearbook, vol.14 (1978) Introduction: The relationship between military and social organization has long been a topic of major concern and debate among scholars specializing in the history of the European Middle Ages. It is a topic of importance, for, as we who live in […]

British Library, Qatar Foundation, to work together to digitize historical documents

A partnership exploring ways to transform online resources for the study of the history, science and culture of the Arabian Gulf was announced yesterday by Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development and the British Library. Her Highness Sheikha Mozah Bint Nasser Al-Missned, Chairperson of Qatar Foundation, and Baroness Tessa Blackstone, Chairman of the […]

Books as a Source of Medical Education for Women in the Middle Ages

In this essay, I would like to explore the degree to which medical books may have functioned as an alternate source of medical education to women who, because of their sex, could not move within the same social and intellectual circles as men.

Where the Philosopher Finishes, the Physician Begins: Medicine and the Arts Course in Thirteenth-Century Oxford

Where the Philosopher Finishes, the Physician Begins: Medicine and the Arts Course in Thirteenth-Century Oxford By Roger French Dynamis : Acta Hispanica ad Medicinae Scientiarumque, vol. 20 (2000) Abstract: In the thirteenth century the English universities were different from others, particularly those in the south of Europe, in two important ways: they taught more natural […]

Learning Medieval Medicine: The Boundaries of University Teaching

Learning Medieval Medicine: The Boundaries of University Teaching By Cornelius O’Boyle Dynamis : Acta Hispanica ad Medicinae Scientiarumque. Historiam Illustrandam, vol. 20 (2000) Introduction: What was new about teaching medicine in a university context? What distinguished it from the sort of medical education that went before? In the past, historians have treated these questions either […]

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