Advertisement

Rómverja saga: an introduction and a translation

Rómverja saga is an Old Icelandic translation of three Latin works on historical themes from the classical period. In this thesis, I provide the first English translation of this little-known text in the hope that it might prove a resource for scholars interested in the reception of Latin literature in the medieval period.

The Making of Flateyjarbók: What we are learning about Iceland’s National Treasure

Made in the last quarter of the 14th century, Flateyjarbók (Book of Flatey) is probably the finest manuscript that Iceland has ever produced.

Hveiti ok Hunang: Viking Age Icelandic Mead?

This paper will try and draw out the picture of mead in Viking Age Iceland, a picture worth elaborating on due to the importance of Icelandic sources of information for an even larger culture.

‘To Talk of Many Things’: Whales, Walrus, and Seals in Medieval Icelandic Literature

In comparing the roles of whales, walrus, and seals, this study will examine the themes that recur throughout the Old Icelandic literary tradition, and how these may have been influenced by the circumstances of the time.

The Legendary Topography of the Viking Settlement of Iceland

This paper focuses on Icelanders’ myth of origin as presented in the various Landnámabók redactions, and explores how a largely fictional medieval text can assert ownership and control over territory, and ultimately contribute to the creation of a legendary topography.

How a volcanic eruption influenced Iceland’s conversion to Christianity

Memories of the largest lava flood in the history of Iceland, recorded in an apocalyptic medieval poem, were used to drive the island’s conversion to Christianity, new research suggests.

The Medieval Magazine: (Volume 4: No. 4): Issue 106

In this issue, we look medieval cannibalism, dietary advice to a king, animal sex in art, the medieval precinct of St. Paul’s, visit Dorchester Abbey, and look at the life of Edward II.

Bloodfeud and Miracles: Creating and Killing a Saint

Hrafn Sveinbjarnarson was a physician and chieftain in Iceland who was drawn into a bloodfeud that ultimately resulted in his death.

Erosive and Mechanical Tooth Wear in Viking Age Icelanders

The importance of the Icelandic Sagas as a source of information about diet habits in medieval Iceland, and possibly other Nordic countries, is obvious.

Gender Ambiguity in Medieval Iceland: Legal Framework and Saga Dynamics

In the judgmental genre of the Icelandic family saga, gender transgression is always central to plot dynamics and this is its only rationale for inclusion.

‘To Talk of Many Things’: Whales, Walrus, and Seals in Medieval Icelandic Literature

The use of whales, walrus, and seals in the sagas illustrates a cultural map of the ocean. This network of places, known and imagined, is filled in by trade goods, species and place names, and stories that incorporate the denizens of the deep.

Medieval Iceland, Greenland, and the New Human Condition: A case study in integrated environmental humanities

By interlinking analyses of historically grounded literature with archaeological studies and environmental science, valuable new perspectives can emerge on how these past societies may have understood and coped with environmental impacts.

The World’s Saga: An English Translation of the Old Norse Veraldar saga, a History of the World in Six Ages

Veraldar saga is a medieval Icelandic prose universal history written in the Old Norse vernacular. It describes the history of the world divided into six “ages” from the Biblical creation narrative until the reign of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa.

Power and Political Communication. Feasting and Gift Giving in Medieval Iceland

Unlike modern friendship, its medieval namesake was anything but a free and spontaneous practice, and neither were its primary modes and media of expression.

Combat in Saga Literature: Traces of martial arts in medieval Iceland

On a first glance, the Íslendingasögur can seem like a never-ending chain of feud killings, and many of the best known and most noteworthy saga scenes are scenes of combat.

A Case of an Odd Saga: Structure in Bjarnar saga Hítdælakappa

The discussion of ‘Bjarnar saga Hítdælakappa’ structure has resulted in it being described either as a clumsily made saga or as an odd, non-mainstream saga. However, a scholastic attempt to find the narrative strategy behind the veil of clumsiness has shown that the seemingly loosely constructed narrative of the “Icelandic” part appears to be planned in a rather sophisticated and artistic way.

Communities of Death in Medieval Iceland

In Iceland, the introduction of Christianity around 1000 AD was associated with fundamental chnges in burial customs.

Old Norse White Walkers?

Fear of the undead is by no means a new sensation to humankind; the Icelanders, for instance, knew it centuries ago.

The character of commercial fishing in Icelandic waters in the fifteenth century

The character of commercial fishing in Icelandic waters in the fifteenth century By Mark Gardiner Cod and Herring: The Archaeology and History of Medieval Sea Fishing, eds. J. Barrett and D. Orton (Oxbow Books, 2016) Abstract: From the early fifteenth century English vessels began fishing in Icelandic waters. They adopted a mixed approach of fishing and trading to […]

New Medieval Books: Iceland

Five new books for those interested in the sagas and society of Iceland during the Middle Ages.

Shapeshifting in Old Norse-Icelandic Literature

This article aims to cast a light upon the colorful yet largely unknown shapechanging motifs found in Old Norse-Icelandic literature as well as in related literary works conceived from Classical times until the middle of the 16th century

Popular Culture and Royal Propaganda in Norway and Iceland in the 13th century

Do the kings presented in Strengleikar appear as the European Christian rex justus kings, which was the dominant medieval royal model, or do they convey another image – an image that may be interpreted to explain both the intended function and the popularity of the translations in Norway and Iceland

The use and the abuse of history, national heritage and nationalism

‘Icelanders or Norwegians? Leifur, Snorri and national identity then and now’ followed by a panel discussion

Book Review: A Medieval Woman’s Companion by Susan Signe Morrison

Susan Signe Morrison’s book, “A Medieval Woman’s Companion” brings the contributions of medieval women, famous and obscure, to the forefront in this fantastic introductory text.

medievalverse magazine
WordPress Security