Free Online Course on Medieval Music Begins today

from ink to sound

The University of Basel and Future Learn have teamed up to offer a seven week free online course that will teach the history of musical notation in the Middle Ages, and show you how to decode medieval music manuscripts.

Agincourt 600 Celebrated with Pomp and Pageantry at Westminster Abbey

Diana Heath, Metalwork Conservator lays Henry V's sword on the High Altar at Westminster Abbey. Photo courtesy of Dean & Chapter of Westminster.

600 years ago, the bells of Westminster Abbey rang out as word arrived in London that Henry V had defeated the French in Agincourt. 600 years later to the very day, the bells pealed out again to commemorate a medieval battle where the English were vastly outnumbered but still came home victorious.

Medieval Monastic Library to be recreated online

Durham Priory Library Recreated project

Durham University and Durham Cathedral have teamed to digitally recreate a medieval monastic library.

John Gower’s Handwriting identified

British Library, Add. MS 59495, fol. 39v. - image from the International John Gower Society

John Gower, considered to be one of the greatest poets of medieval England, left behind several remarkable works. A scholar has now been able to identify poems that were written by his own hand, including a poignant piece about how he was going blind.

Chinese translation of De re metallica discovered

Kunyu gezhi (1640): End of the table of contents, with seals and a note added by later reader Photo: Dr. Cao Jin, by courtesy of Nanjing Library

Scholars from the University of Tübingen have discovered a 17th century Chinese translation of large parts of De re metallica or On the Nature of Metals, a mining handbook written by Georgius Agricola in 1556.

Glimpse of medieval trade revealed along the River Forth

School pupils from St Ninian's Primary School uncovering the medieval harbour of Cambuskenneth Abbey © GUARD Archaeology Ltd

Over two weeks in September, the Cambuskenneth Harbours project brought together a wide range of experts and local volunteers to investigate the medieval harbour of Cambuskenneth Abbey, which lies on the River Forth near Stirling.

Byzantine-era mosaic map restored in Israel

Photo by Nikki Davidov, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

Although the Byzantine-era church that existed about 1500 years ago in southern Israel no longer exists, its mosaic floor has now been restored and shows a map revealing a scene of streets and buildings from an Egyptian town.

Beautiful 15th century sculpture now on display at the Getty Museum

Saint Philip by the Master of the Rimini Altarpiece - photo courtesy The Getty Museum

The Getty Museum is now showing its latest acquisition – a rare medieval alabaster sculpture of Saint Philip by the Master of the Rimini Altarpiece.

Global Middle Ages Project launches website

Global Middle Ages Project

The Global Middle Ages Project, founded in 2007 by Geraldine Heng and Susan Noakes, features six digital projects.

The Vikings and clothing accessories they brought home

Mounting from a reliquary, produced in Northumbria in the 8th century. The mounting have been modified and was used as a brooch. It was found in a woman's grave from the second part of the 9th century, in Buskerud, Norway - Photo courtesy University of Oslo Museum of Cultural History

New study on the use of imported objects in Viking Age Scandinavia

Priests found spiritual satisfaction by serving nuns, Stanford medieval historian says

A female scribe and male artist present their book to the Virgin Mary in this medieval manuscript, called the Guta-Sintram Codex (c. 1154). The Codex supports Fiona Griffiths' finding that men and women collaborated during this period of history. Photo by Claude Truong-Ngoc / Wikimedia Commons

A study of medieval texts and imagery by Stanford history Professor Fiona Griffiths counters commonly held beliefs about misogynistic practices in medieval Europe. Griffiths’ research reveals how some male clergy acknowledged and celebrated the perceived religious superiority of nuns.

New Location for the Battle of Crécy discovered

Proposed site of the Battle of Crecy, showing the English and French approaches to the battlefield and the site of the English wagenburg and defensive ditch upon the site of the Herse, superimposed upon the modern topography. Image courtesy Michael Livingston

For over 250 years it has been believed that the Battle of Crécy, one of the most famous battles of the Middle Ages, was fought just north of the French town of Crécy-en-Ponthieu in Picardy. Now, a new book that contains the most intensive examination of sources about the battle to date, offers convincing evidence that the fourteenth-century battle instead took place 5.5 km to the south.

Between 50 and 75 medieval skeletons discovered at Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey - photo by Daniel Gillaspia / Flickr

Archaeologists have discovered the skeletal remains of between 50 to 75 individuals buried in the walls of Westminster Abbey. It is believed that they date from the 11th or early 12th century.

What’s New in Scandinavian Rune Stones

The Vik stone (U 288), Uppland, Sweden. 12th cent. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons; photographer: Robin Iversen.

Danielle Turner reports on the papers from the session The World of Images of the Scandinavian Rune Stones

30 Sagas in 30 Days on Twitter

30 Sagas in 30 Days on Twitter

This month, a scholar is using Twitter to tell the stories of thirty lesser known tales written by Icelanders.

Simon Fraser University unveils its first medieval manuscript

SFU archivist Melanie Hardbattle peruses the SFU Library's first medieval manuscript, dated 1269. Photo courtesy SFU News

Written in Latin on parchment, and dated to 1269, it features student notes scrawled in the margins, as well as amusing decorative drawings.

Fallen tree reveals medieval skeleton in Ireland

Photo from Sligo-Leitrim Archaeological Services / Facebook

Last May a storm in northwest Ireland blew over a 215-year old tree. It also unearth an unusual find – the skeletal remains of a young man who lived nearly a thousand years ago.

Walking Tour of the Battle of Stamford Bridge

Battle of Stamford Bridge - Wilhelm Wetlesen: Illustration for Harald Hardraada saga, Heimskringla 1899-edition

The Stamford Bridge Battlefield Walk takes place on the 26th September at 10:30am, a day after the battle would have taken place in 1066, and starts at Shallows Car Park, Stamford Bridge.

The earliest use of the F-word discovered

Cheshire County Court Rolls - TNA CHES 29/23 - photo by Paul Booth

An English historian has come across the word ‘fuck’ in a court case dating to year 1310, making it the earliest known reference to the swear word.

Call for Papers: Exploring the Fourteenth Century Across the Eastern and Western Christian World

Leeds cfp

Session at Leeds International Medieval Congress, 4-7 July 2016

Call for Papers: Death and Identity in Scotland from the Medieval to the Modern

death and identity scotland

Friday 29 January to Sunday 31 January 2016, at New College, University of Edinburgh

What do Cod Bones from the Mary Rose tell us about the global fish trade?

Atlantic cod

New stable isotope and ancient DNA analysis of the bones of stored cod provisions recovered from the wreck of the Tudor warship Mary Rose, which sank off the coast of southern England in 1545, has revealed that the fish in the ship’s stores had been caught in surprisingly distant waters

Cast of Bede’s skull rediscovered

Cast of Bede's Skull - Photo: J. Story, with  permission  of  the  director  of  the  Duckworth  Laboratory  at  the University  of  Cambridge,  Leverhulme  Centre  for  Human  Evolutionary Studies

‘The Skull of Bede’ exhibition opened yesterday at Bede’s World, Jarrow

A clerk ther was of Rowan County also…. What the Kim Davis Case Tells Us About America’s Long Middle Ages

Mug shot of Kim Davis

Have you ever thought about the relationship between the words “clerk” and “clergy”?

Finding the Battle of Bannockburn

Map of Bannockburn showing the new archaeological find spots and the likeliest course of the battle over 23 and 24 June 1314. © Tony Pollard / GUARD Archaeology Ltd

Between 2011 and 2014, a new search for the site of the Battle of Bannockburn took place, spurred on by the 700th anniversary of the battle and the National Trust for Scotland’s new state-of-the-art Bannockburn Battlefield Centre.

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