30 Sagas in 30 Days on Twitter

30 Sagas in 30 Days on Twitter

This month, a scholar is using Twitter to tell the stories of thirty lesser known tales written by Icelanders.

Simon Fraser University unveils its first medieval manuscript

SFU archivist Melanie Hardbattle peruses the SFU Library's first medieval manuscript, dated 1269. Photo courtesy SFU News

Written in Latin on parchment, and dated to 1269, it features student notes scrawled in the margins, as well as amusing decorative drawings.

Fallen tree reveals medieval skeleton in Ireland

Photo from Sligo-Leitrim Archaeological Services / Facebook

Last May a storm in northwest Ireland blew over a 215-year old tree. It also unearth an unusual find – the skeletal remains of a young man who lived nearly a thousand years ago.

Walking Tour of the Battle of Stamford Bridge

Battle of Stamford Bridge - Wilhelm Wetlesen: Illustration for Harald Hardraada saga, Heimskringla 1899-edition

The Stamford Bridge Battlefield Walk takes place on the 26th September at 10:30am, a day after the battle would have taken place in 1066, and starts at Shallows Car Park, Stamford Bridge.

The earliest use of the F-word discovered

Cheshire County Court Rolls - TNA CHES 29/23 - photo by Paul Booth

An English historian has come across the word ‘fuck’ in a court case dating to year 1310, making it the earliest known reference to the swear word.

Call for Papers: Exploring the Fourteenth Century Across the Eastern and Western Christian World

Leeds cfp

Session at Leeds International Medieval Congress, 4-7 July 2016

Call for Papers: Death and Identity in Scotland from the Medieval to the Modern

death and identity scotland

Friday 29 January to Sunday 31 January 2016, at New College, University of Edinburgh

What do Cod Bones from the Mary Rose tell us about the global fish trade?

Atlantic cod

New stable isotope and ancient DNA analysis of the bones of stored cod provisions recovered from the wreck of the Tudor warship Mary Rose, which sank off the coast of southern England in 1545, has revealed that the fish in the ship’s stores had been caught in surprisingly distant waters

Cast of Bede’s skull rediscovered

Cast of Bede's Skull - Photo: J. Story, with  permission  of  the  director  of  the  Duckworth  Laboratory  at  the University  of  Cambridge,  Leverhulme  Centre  for  Human  Evolutionary Studies

‘The Skull of Bede’ exhibition opened yesterday at Bede’s World, Jarrow

A clerk ther was of Rowan County also…. What the Kim Davis Case Tells Us About America’s Long Middle Ages

Mug shot of Kim Davis

Have you ever thought about the relationship between the words “clerk” and “clergy”?

Finding the Battle of Bannockburn

Map of Bannockburn showing the new archaeological find spots and the likeliest course of the battle over 23 and 24 June 1314. © Tony Pollard / GUARD Archaeology Ltd

Between 2011 and 2014, a new search for the site of the Battle of Bannockburn took place, spurred on by the 700th anniversary of the battle and the National Trust for Scotland’s new state-of-the-art Bannockburn Battlefield Centre.

A Feast fit for a King at York

King Henry VIII (Nathan Wade) surveys the Tudor-feast inspired top table at Barley Hall, York. Photo courtesy  Jorvik Group

The JORVIK Group offer a time-travelling gastronomic treat during York’s Food and Drink Festival

Free online course on the Battle of Agincourt begins in October

Battle of Agincourt, depicted in A pictorial history of England (1854)

One of the leading experts on the famous Battle of Agincourt will be part of a free online course that begins on October 19th.

Fireworks in Scotland date back to 1507, researchers find

Edinburgh Castle with fireworks in 2011 - Photo by weir thru a lens / Flickr

Previously experts believed that fireworks were first used in Stirling in 1566, however, new evidence suggests that it was actually around 59 years earlier and in the Scottish capital. It is thought that ‘fireballs’ featured in a great tournament staged by King James lV, which took place at the base of Castle Rock, in 1507, in the area which is now the King’s Stables Road.

13th century insult discovered etched into the walls of Nidaros Cathedral

Photo by Asbjørn Svarstad /   Dagbladet News


Bucks County Museum looking to acquire Lenborough Coin Hoard

lenborough hoard - photo courtesy British Museum

Late last year, over 5200 silver coins was found by a metal detectorist in England. Now, the public will get a taste of this hoard, when 21 coins go on a special exhibit at at Bucks County Museum.

Drone Technology Aids in Discoveries at Medieval Irish Sites

Archaeological Discoveries in Ireland

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) have been gaining attention in the news for the last few years, but archaeologists like Saint Louis University history professor Thomas Finan, Ph.D., have always appreciated what aerial photography could accomplish.

National Library of Wales teams up with Wikipedia to share digital images

Peniarth MS 481D - from National Library of Wales

Those looking for images of the history of Wales, including its medieval past, can now make use of thousands of digital images that have been made available on Wikipedia thanks to the National Library of Wales.

High tech tools used to understand medieval manuscripts

Many documents are very delicate and sensitive, and ideally should not be touched or exposed to direct light. Photo by Nils Kristian Eikeland/NTNU Universitetsbiblioteket

Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology’s Gunnerus Library are developing new high-tech tools to unlock the secrets hidden in old parchment.

18 Millionth Visitor comes to JORVIK Viking Centre

McKee family outside JORVIK with Viking re-enactor, Arnor (Max O'Keeffe) - Photo courtesy York Archaeological Trust

JORVIK Viking Centre opened to the public on the 14th April, 1984, attracting people from all over the world to discover what life was like over 1,000 years ago in York.

‘Décapitation’ by Femme No. 5 – get your own Tudor-inspired perfume at York

decapitation - Photo courtesy York Archaeological Trust

Catherine Howard, the fifth wife of Henry VIII who was said to have had an illicit liaison during her visit to York in 1541, is the inspiration of a new perfume now available at Barley Hall in York as part of its ‘Power & Glory: York in the Time of Henry VIII’ exhibition.

Medieval Treasures from the Digital.Bodleian

Image from the Menologion, a 14th century Byzantine work, now online courtesy Digital.Bodleian

Last month, the Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford officially launched their Digital.Bodleian online resource, which allows users to view, download and share over 100,000 images going back to the Middle Ages.

Why did they stop building tower house castles in Ireland?

Mahee Castle - Mahee Castle, Ringneill Road, Mahee Island, County Down, Northern Ireland, Photo by Ardfern / Wikicommons

One of the most visible reminders of Ireland’s medieval history are the tower house castles that are scattered throughout the country. For centuries they were the homes and fortresses for the native Irish elites as well as the English and Scottish settlers. However, by the early seventeenth-century it seems that they were now being abandoned and left the fall into ruin. What happened?

Mosaics discovered at Byzantine-era Synagogue in Israel

The newly found mosaic with an inscription in the Horvat Kur synagogue (photographed by Jaakko Haapanen, www.haapanenphotography.com; © Kinneret Regional Project.

Excavations of a medieval synagogue in Israel dating to the Byzantine period (4th—7th c. CE) have uncovered a partially-preserved colorful mosaic floor.

Explore the Medieval Jewish Trail in Winchester

Winchester medival Jewish trail map

Visitors to Winchester have a new way to explore the English city’s medieval Jewish past. Winchester City Council and the University of Winchester have launched a new city trail telling the story of this community.

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