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‘Lost chapel’ of Westminster Palace revealed in new 3D model

The first dedicated House of Commons chamber, destroyed in the 1834 Palace of Westminster fire, has been reconstructed with the help of 3D visualisation technology.

Morbidity and mortality of leprosy in the Middle Ages

During the Middle Ages, nearly everyone in Europe was exposed to the disfiguring, painful and ostracizing disease of leprosy. But did contracting the disease necessarily increase a person’s chances of dying?

Unravelling a medieval murder mystery

In the ultimate cold case an Aberdeen historian has re-examined a 600 year old murder, fitting of a plot for Game of Thrones.

Sutton Hoo to be transformed

£1.8 million grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund will lead to a new experience for visitors of the famous Anglo-Saxon site.

British Library purchases 13th-century Psalter for £775,000

A rare and beautiful Psalter produced in thirteenth-century London has been acquired by the British Library. The Mostyn Psalter-Hours can now be viewed online.

Call for Papers: Sixth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies

June 18-20, 2018, at Saint Louis University

700-year-old saint myth has been proven (almost) true

Scientists confirm that the age and content of an old sack is in accordance with a medieval myth about Saint Francis of Assisi.

Video: Porpoise found in medieval graveyard

Here is the video of an interesting archaeological discovery on the island of Chapelle Dom Hue near Guernsey.

Animals came with medieval trade in Indian Ocean, researchers find

The earliest introduction of domestic chickens and black rats from Asia to the east coast of Africa came via maritime routes between the 7th and 8th centuries AD.

The First Zero

When did the mathematical zero begin being used? New research revealed this week by the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries shows that a manuscript from India bearing the symbol was written in the 3rd or 4th century, making it the world’s oldest recorded origin of the zero that we use today.

Archaeologists explore medieval manor linked with the Knights Hospitallers

University of Leicester archaeologists have returned this month to Castle Hill Country Park at Beaumont Leys to continue exploring a large scheduled ancient monument, Castle Hill, believed to be the remains of a medieval manorial site linked with the Knights Hospitallers. Last year, a two-week community dig on the site uncovered well-preserved medieval archaeology dating […]

The Vikings are coming to Toronto

The Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Toronto, Canada will be hosting the final stop of the North American tour of Vikings: The Exhibition. Beginning on November 4th, it draws on current archaeological scholarship and research, offering a fresh perspective on the Viking age that challenges some of the commonly held myths and perceptions about the […]

Neath Abbey reconstructed digitally

Neath Abbey — a site that has witnessed Cistercian monks, Tudor splendour and thriving industry over its 900-year history — will share its story with visitors in a new digital reconstruction.

Byzantine mosaic discovered in Jerusalem

Israeli archaeologists have discovered a 1,500 year old mosaic floor near the Damascus Gate in the Old City of Jerusalem. It is believed to be part of a hostel built by the Byzantine emperor Justinian for Christian pilgrims.

Medieval Gospel Commentary, lost for 1500 years – now translated and online

The earliest Latin Commentary on the Gospels, lost for over 1500 years, has been rediscovered and made available in English for the first time, thanks to research from the University of Birmingham.

Call for Papers: Medievalism in Popular Culture

PCA/ACA 2018 National Conference – March 28th – 31st, 2018 – Indianapolis, Indiana

Global Medieval Sourcebook launched

A new website curated by Stanford faculty and students, the Global Medieval Sourcebook, translates medieval literature into English for the first time.

260,000 digitized images of Jewish art and artifacts now online

The Hebrew University’s Center for Jewish Art has launched the world’s largest index of Jewish Art, a collection of more than 260,000 digitized images of Jewish objects and artifacts from all over the world.

DNA samples reveal Viking Age fish trade

It has been assumed that the Vikings were trading in cod, but so far solid evidence has been lacking. With new methods, it is possible to extract ancient DNA from fishbone remnants and this can provide some exciting new information!

Fused Imaging Reveals Sixth-Century Writing Hidden Inside Bookbinding

After being hidden for centuries, the secrets within medieval manuscripts might soon come to light.

X-rays identify medieval manuscript ink

Analyzing pigments in medieval illuminated manuscript pages at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) is opening up some new areas of research bridging the arts and sciences.

Archaeologists unearth medieval treasures at Pictish fort

Scottish archaeologists exploring a Pictish fort have discovered surprising treasures, including an eleven-hundred year old coin.

St Columba’s cell revealed by archaeologists

This discovery is massive. St Columba is a key figure in Western Christendom. He was the national patron saint of Scotland in the Middle Ages.

What’s more bloody – Game of Thrones or the Wars of the Roses?

Has Game of Thrones become far too bloody? Surprisingly, statistical analyses actually indicate that the fictional show is quite realistic compared to a real life medieval civil war.

Call for Papers: The Medieval Horse – IMC 2018

Call for Papers for the sessions on THE MEDIEVAL HORSE at the International Medieval Congress 2018 at Leeds, 2-5 July 2018

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