Foreign envoys and resident Norwegians in the Late Middle Ages – a cultural clash?

In this article, I will discuss the question of multiculturalism in Norway in the Late Middle Ages, focusing on potential cultural differences in the interaction between Norwegian farmers and foreign envoys or royal administrators.

The Relationship of the Italian and Southern French Cathars, 1170-1320

The aim of this thesis is to answer two questions, namely why Southern French Cathars chose to flee to Italy
when persecuted in the early thirteenth century and secondly to assess the extent to which Catharism was a ‘universal church’.

Anglo-Scandinavian Literature and the Post-Conquest Period

This thesis concerns narratives about Anglo-Scandinavian contact and literary traditions of Scandinavian origin which circulated in England in the post-conquest period.

The Norse Penny Reconsidered: The Goddard Coin—Hoax or Genuine?

This article considers the penny’s numismatic and archaeological context, and engages with the debate from a Norwegian perspective.

I was there. Constantine Akropolites’ Typikon

Constantine Akropolites wrote an appendix to the typikon for the Church of our Lord’s Resurrection in Constantinople, rebuilt by his father, George (1217-82).

Anglo-Danish Connections and the Organisation of the Early Danish Church: Contribution to a Debate

The Christianization of Northern Europe is closely linked to concepts of cultural transfer, transmission, and influence. Latin Christianity was essentially foreign to the medieval North, and foreign expertise was needed for the implementation of the Christian faith.

The control of Kent in the ninth century

To one who lived through the political turmoil in England during the second half of the ninth century, the most significant aspect of a changing world must have been the intensification of Viking raids, culminating with the ‘conquests’ of the ancient kingdoms of East Anglia, Mercia and Northumbria.

The elusive Norse harbours of the North Atlantic: why they were abandoned, and why they are so hard to find

In the 8th century, Scandinavians began to press westwards across the North Atlantic; exploring, raiding, colonizing and trading.

Two Different Views of Knighthood in the Early Fifteenth-Century: Le Livre de Bouciquaut and the Works of Christine de Pizan

This article contends that the view of knighthood defended by the author of the biography was strikingly different in many ways from that held by Christine.

Three individuals, three stories, three burials from medieval Trondheim, Norway

This article presents the life stories of three individuals who lived in Trondheim, Norway, during the 13th century. Based on skeletal examinations, facial reconstructions, genetic analyses, and stable oxygen isotope analyses, the birthplace, mobility, ancestry, pathology, and physical appearance of these people are presented.

Episcopal Virginity in Medieval England

The literature on medieval sainthood is substantial, rich and varied, but on one point it is almost unanimous: sexuality, and in particular virginity, was of far greater significance to female saints than to their male counterparts.

The ‘joyous entry’ of Archduke Maximilian into Antwerp (13 January 1478): an analysis of a ‘most elegant and dignified’ dialogue

An in-depth analysis of a contemporary account of Maximilian’s joyous entry into Antwerp (13 January 1478) adds a new perspective to historiography by showing how the public urban spaces functioned as complex social products.

One of his own: the Irish participant in the assassination of Tigernán Ua Ruairc

Tigernán Ua Ruairc was King of Bréifne and Conmaicne. In fact this kingdom reached its greatest extent during his long reign, between c. 1124 and his assassination in 1172.

Medieval Clothing in Uvdal, Norway

A special feature of three of the bodies was that their skulls were wrapped in linen cloth. Not only the forehead and neck, but also mouth, nose and eyes were covered with linen. These linen wrappings must have been applied especially for burial purposes.

‘Sisters Under the Skin’? Anglo-Saxon Nuns and Nunneries in Southern England

The history of female monastic life in Anglo-Saxon England has generally been seen as falling into two distinct phases conveniently separated by the Carolingian Renaissance and the Viking invasions of the ninth century.

The Giving and Withholding of Consent in Late Twelfth-Century French Literature

My investigations into the depiction and punishment of rape in late twelfth-century literature in northern France stem from a particular interest in some of the earlier branches of the Roman de Renart.

The Monk Who Knew the Ways of Love

It has been suggested that the art of the troubadour is original primarily in its exercise of choice within a relatively strictly limited field and that, if art results from the tension between freedom and restraint, then the two poles of this dialectic are the exercise of choice of expression and the limitation of the field in terms of subject-matter and linguistic register.

Old Norse Ship Names and Ship Terms

The nautical language of the North Sea Germanic area is a very elaborate and rich terminology. This was no less true at the time I am dealing with, namely the period from the Viking Age up to about 1400 A.D.

The Penny in the Pennylands: Coinage in Scotland in the Early Middle Ages

Other terms of account, such as shilling, mancus, mark and ora are to be found in Old English documents, but the silver penny was tile only coin to be issued, and remained so until the groat was introduced by Edward I in 1279.

The Idea of the Castle in Medieval England

The castle has long been regarded as a practical, military architecture, introduced by the Normans as a tool of feudal control. More recently, castles have been accorded a certain symbolic significance, expressing military and political power.

The Templar Lands in Lincolnshire in the Early Fourteenth Century

The focus of the study is the Templar estates in Lincolnshire during the first four decades of the fourteenth century. Within this context, two themes are explored: the characteristics of Templar farming and estate management and the fate of the former Templar properties between 1312 and 1338.

Wonder and Scepticism in the Long Twelfth Century

This dissertation proposes that wonder is an initial emotional reaction to a novel phenomenon, and that scepticism, a form of cognition, necessarily follows when the phenomenon is sufficiently bizarre, or out of coherence with one’s prior experience.

Fifteenth-Century Burgundy and the Islamic East

What was the nature and scope of Burgundian contact with the Islamic world? How did Burgundians conceptualise the Islamic East? What were their frames of reference and how were they shaped by contemporaneous events, including further Ottoman penetration into eastern Europe and the fall of Constantinople?

Life, Literature and Prayer in Early Anglo-Saxon England

This thesis deals with the representation of prayer in literary texts from early Anglo-Saxon England, investigating the role of reading in the life of prayer and the various ways in which literary texts from the eighth and ninth centuries attest to cultures of prayer in this period.

Which Witch?: Morgan le Fay as Shape-Shifter and English Perceptions of Magic Reflected in Arthurian Legend

The name Morgan le Fay holds many meanings and has appeared in various forms throughout the course of medieval and modern history.

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