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‘As If Augustine Had Said’: Textual Interpretation and Augustinian Ambiguity in a Medieval Debate on Predestination

This paper reevaluates a sample of Hincmar’s writings in the 840s and 850s to argue that he sought to make explicit what Augustine had left unclear regarding predestination by appealing to common standards of orthodoxy in the forms of additional patristic authors, conciliar judgments, and liturgical practices.

The Scapegoat: Impotence and Witchcraft in the Middle Ages

This essay investigates the question of how women were used as scapegoats for male impotence during the Witch Craze.

Monstrous Muslims? Depicting Muslims in French Illuminated Manuscripts from 1200-1420

This paper examines depictions of Muslims in illuminated manuscripts produced in France between 1200-1420 that feature images of Christian-Muslim interactions.

The Concept of a Boundary Between the Latin and the Byzantine Civilizations of Europe

This boundary runs from the Barents Sea in the north to the Adriatic Sea in the south. On its western side nations are associated with the Latin legacy, while on the eastern side are those that relate to the Byzantine tradition and later on, to Moscow.

Joan of Arc’s Ring: A Question of Possession and Cultural Patrimony

To begin to grasp the significance of this object to the French psyche, one must first understand the full import of the Maid of Orleans within the context of French history and culture.

Cats and Dogs: The Development of the Household Pet through Symbolic Interpretations and Social Practices in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

The shifting attitudes and social practices between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in Western Europe fostered the reexamination of the relationship between humans and animals.

Post-Apocalyptic Fiction: A Return to the Medieval

A specific theme in post-apocalyptic science fiction is a return to a new medieval context.

The Alternate Islands: A Chapter in the History of SF, with a Select Bibliography on the SF of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance

Cockayne is a universal folk legend of a land of peace, plenty, and sloth, well known already in Antiquity, and refurbished—probably by vagrant student-poets—in the Middle Ages.

Maps, Travel and Exploration in the Middle Ages: Some Reflections about Anachronism

How were maps conceived in the Middle Ages? Using the words “map”, “travel” and “exploration”, historians must be wary of anachronism.

Good versus Evil: Representations of the Monstrous in Thirteenth Century Anglo-French Apocalypse Manuscripts

This paper examines one of the oldest ideological conflicts of all time: that between the divine powers of good and evil in the Book of Revelation, as represented in thirteenth century Anglo-French apocalypse manuscripts.

The Roots of Fencing from the Twelfth to the Fourteenth Centuries in the French Language Area

This article offers a partial overview on fencing, as recognized through archive records, as well as French epics and romances from the twelfth to the early fourteenth century.

The Twelfth-century documents of St. George’s of Tròccoli (Sicily)

This study publishes for the first time six authentic and original documents from mid-twelfth-century Norman Sicily. Three are bilingual, written in Greek and Arabic, and three are Arabic.

The Role Of Ritual And Ceremonial In The Reign Of Edward I

The following paper will explore occasions of ceremony and ritual linked to King Edward I as an arbiter of royal power, as well as consider the means by which he utilized the influence of his position and the majesty of the monarchy to affirm and reinforce his extensive authority.

Historical rise of waterpower initiated the collapse of salmon stocks

We demonstrate that populations declined by up to 90% during the transitional period between the Early Middle Ages (c. 450–900 AD) and Early Modern Times (c. 1600 AD).

Disimpassioned Monks and Flying Nuns: Emotion Management in Early Medieval Rules

What do a monastery and an airplane have in common? Both are closed communities; there is no way out (at least after the plane has started). Both are regulated by rules different from those followed in the world outside.

Orientalism in Assassin’s Creed

On first glance Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed from 2007, the first of a long and popular series, presents itself as yet another example of Orientalism in video games

Semi-fictionalized History as Teaching Aids: Opportunities for learning history in Assassin’s Creed II as a digital game and novel

This study is a hermeneutic content analysis of both a digital video game, in this case Assassin’s Creed II, and the written story based on that game, Assassin’s Creed Renaissance.

‘Nothing is true, everything is permitted’: The Portrayal of the Nizari Isma’ilis in the Assassin’s Creed Game Series

Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed does a remarkable – though not flawless – job in presenting a well-balanced game narrative, which incorporates not only a historically justified representation of the Nizari Isma’ilis, but also implicitly corrects one of the most famous Western legends about the so-called ‘Assassins’

Gaming history: computer and video games as historical scholarship

The video game offers far greater potential for the creation and presentation of history than any other entertainment or interactive media.

Undercutting the Fabric of Courtly Love with ‘Tokens of Love’ in Wolfram Von Eschenbach’s Parzival

In this article I will focus on two areas in which clothes provide us insights into Wolfram’s complex commentary on constructions of masculinity and femininity, and the discourse of courtly love

The Poetics of Wolves: Mapping a Metaphor in World Literature

In my paper I want to trace the ways in which the metaphor of the wolf transforms over time and cultural space, how it epitomizes different and shifting cultural anxieties, trauma, but also hope.

Allegories of Sight: Blinding and Power in Late Anglo-Saxon England

The practical necessity of sight to effective participation in Anglo-Saxon life is reflected in the multifaceted depictions of punitive blinding in late Anglo-Saxon literature.

Muscular Medievalism

Our job as medievalists—as humanists—is not to wall off the Middle Ages from public discourse when it’s being misused or mishandled.

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