Advertisement

Cross purposes: Frankish levantine perceptions of gender and female participation in the crusades, 1147-1254

Though numerous historians have studied the participation of women in the Levantine crusades during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, few have investigated the trends in gender perceptions within the Latin states.

Network Analysis of the Viking Age in Ireland as portrayed in Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh

The year 2014 marked the 1000th anniversary of the Battle of Clontarf, an iconic event in the history of Ireland.

Reading Margery Kempe’s inner voices

The richness of Margery’s multi-sensory experience, and the care with which it is depicted, is illuminated by and illuminates the experience of contemporary voice-hearers, offering a powerful alternative perspective to often reductive bio-medical understandings.

Mann and Gender in Old English Prose: A Pilot Study

This article aims to present a preliminary study of the various uses of mann as attested in Old English prose, particularly in its surprisingly consistent use by an individual author, namely that of the ninth-century Old English Martyrology.

The Insular Landscape of the Old English Poem The Phoenix

The Old English poem The Phoenix, found in the Exeter Book (fols. 55b–65b), describes the mythical bird, the Edenic landscape it inhabits and the cycle of death and rebirth that it enacts in an extended Christian allegory.

Living with Books in Renaissance Ferrara

The growth of private libraries was one of the most remarkable aspects of the history of the medieval book during the 14th and 15th centuries.

Joanna II of Anjou-Durazzo, the Glorious Queen

This short essay reflects on Queen Joanna as a test case of both the difficulties and the potential that always reside in communication and confrontation between disciplines, even when they are as closely related as history and art history.

Christ as Priest in Byzantine church decoration of the 11th and 12th centuries

The 11th century was a watershed in the Byzantine church decoration.

The York Gospels: a one thousand year biological palimpsest

Medieval manuscripts, carefully curated and conserved, represent not only an irreplaceable documentary record but also a remarkable reservoir of biological information.

Love, Freedom, and Marital Fidelity in Malory’s Morte Darthur

If we examine closely Malory’s representation of courtship and marriage — a sphere of human activity within knightly society where men’s and women’s interests and activities converge — we will realize that he is not at all “misogynistic.”

Pharmacy, Testing, and the Language of Truth in Renaissance Italy

This article examines the role of testing and innovation in sixteenth-century Italian pharmacy. I argue that apothecaries were less concerned with testing drugs for efficacy or creating novel products than with reactivating an older Mediterranean pharmacological tradition and studying the materials on which it relied.

The Viking Shield in the British Isles: Changes in use from the 8th-11th Century in England and the Isle of Man

The Viking Shield in the British Isles: Changes in use from the 8th-11th Century in England and the Isle of Man By Emma Boast Master’s Thesis, University of York, 2011 (re-edited 2017) Abstract: This investigation into the study of the Viking shield will include analysis and interpretation of archaeological material, from England and the Isle of […]

Malaria and malaria-like disease in the early Middle Ages

This paper clears up contours of malaria’s occurrence in Frankish Europe. It surveys sources relevant to its study and establishes guidelines for retrospectively diagnosing the disease.

Characteristics of Gothic Cathedrals in France and their Structural Elements

Cathedrals represent some of the finest examples of interconnections architectural, aesthetic, functional, but also the structural design of the building

Constraining Elites: The Self-Enforcing Constitution of the Patricians of Venice

This paper analyzes how late Middle Age and Renaissance era Venice achieved economic prosperity despite being ruled by elite patricians.

Ramon Llull and The Book of the Order of Chivalry: an attempt to retake the ideals of the Christian Chivalry

This study has as theme the resumption of the ideal of Christian Chivalry, or milles Christi, present in The Book of the Order of Chivalry, from Ramon Llull.

Shapeshifting in Old Norse-Icelandic Literature

This article aims to cast a light upon the colorful yet largely unknown shapechanging motifs found in Old Norse-Icelandic literature as well as in related literary works conceived from Classical times until the middle of the 16th century

Medieval Islamic Thought and the ‘What is X?’ Question

Medieval Islamic Thought and the “What is X?” Question By Thérèse-Anne Druart American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, Vol.73:1 (1999) Introduction: In his early dialogues Plato presents a Socrates who goes around raising the famous “what is x?” question and receiving no satisfactory answer. In the case of Medieval Islamic Thought the raising of the “what is x?” […]

The sex-selective impact of the Black Death and recurring plagues in the Southern Netherlands, 1349-1450

We present a newly compiled database of mortality information taken from mortmain records in Hainaut, Belgium, in the period 1349-1450, which not only is an important new source of information on medieval mortality, but also allows for sex-disaggregation.

Pilgrim and patron: Cnut in post-conquest historical writing

This article examines a number of short narratives from the late eleventh and early twelfth centuries which relate to the activities of Cnut as king of England.

Heads, shoulders, knees and toes: Injury and death in Anglo-Scottish combat, c.1296-c.1403

For all that has been written about this period, little, however, has been produced regarding the realities of war, the impact that it had on the individual soldier, or the wounds suffered by those who engaged in these conflicts.

The Evil That Kings Do: Kingship, Tyranny and William I in Hugo Falcandus

A study of the presentation of William I of Sicily in the work of the pseudo – Hugo Falcandus, with particular attention to the author’s views on the entirety of the Hauteville dynasty and kingship in Sicily through the lens of his reign.

The many faces of Duchess Matilda: matronage, motherhood and mediation in the twelfth century

In this book I argue that the varied visual and textual source material related to Matilda (1156-1189) provides an insight into her duties and responsibilities at her husband’s court.

Frail or hale: Skeletal frailty indices in Medieval London skeletons

The representative nonmonastic, or lay, community in Medieval London comprises samples from Guildhall Yard (1140–1350 CE), Spital Square (1200–1500 CE), St. Mary Graces (1350–1538 CE), and St. Benet Sherehog (1250–1666 CE).

medievalverse magazine