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Living with Medieval Things: Why We Need a Global Medieval Archaeology

This essay argues for the critical relevance of medieval material culture to contemporary politics, and for the necessity of an engaged global medieval archaeology.

‘I watch it for historic reasons.’ Representation and reception of the Middle Ages in ‘A Song of Ice and Fire’ and ‘Game of Thrones’

This article aims to analyse several ideas of the Middle Ages that inspired HBO’s TV show Game of Thrones (HBO 2011-), based on George R. R. Martin’s ongoing series of novels A Song of Ice and Fire (1996-).

From reformed barbarian to “saint-king”: literary portrayals of King Malcolm III Canmore (r. 1058-93) in Scottish historical narratives, c. 1100- 1449

It examines how King Malcolm went from being considered a barbaric king of Scots reformed by the influence of his second wife, Saint Margaret of Scotland (d. 1093), to the Scottish prince exiled in England by Macbeth (r. 1040-1057/8).

Blood Cries Afar: The Forgotten Invasion of England, 1216

The large French expeditionary force that landed in England in May 1216 allied with baronial rebels against King John to divide the country for eighteen months. For a year the French occupied and ruled the richest one-third of England, including the capital, London.

Fighting in women’s clothes: The pictorial evidence of Walpurgis in Ms. I.33

Ms. I.33 is not only the oldest of the known fencing treatises in European context, it is also the only one showing a woman fighting equally with contemporary men.

Fulfilling Gregory’s goal: the conversion of the Anglo-Saxon people

The conversion of the Anglo-Saxons in the seventh century AD was a complex process that involved several stages.

A Pious Mouse and a Deadly Cat: The Schede tou Myos, attributed to Theodore Prodromos

The text, here translated and commented on, is a school exercise but comic in tone, and so appropriate both for pupils and as court entertainment, as it echoes contemporary criticism of monks.

Severity and Selectivity of the Black Death and Recurring Plague in the Southern Netherlands (1349-1450)

This paper offers a newly-compiled database of 25,610 individuals that died between 1349-1450 in the County of Hainaut to test a number of assumptions on the selectivity and severity of late medieval plague outbreaks.

The Square “Fighting March” of the Crusaders at the Battle of Ascalon (1099)

In this paper I will examine a number of theories about the origin of this particular marching formation, based on the manuals attributed to the Byzantine Emperors Maurice (582–602), Leo VI (886–912) and Nicephoros Phocas (963– 69) and several anonymous Byzantine military treatises of the sixth and tenth centuries.

Ampullae and Badges: Pilgrim Paraphernalia in Late Medieval England

Late medieval persons who adorned their hats and cloaks with the traces of their pilgrimage visits grappled with many conflicting perspectives.

‘To Talk of Many Things’: Whales, Walrus, and Seals in Medieval Icelandic Literature

In comparing the roles of whales, walrus, and seals, this study will examine the themes that recur throughout the Old Icelandic literary tradition, and how these may have been influenced by the circumstances of the time.

Earth, air, fire, and water in Beowulf

In this thesis, I explore the intersection of nature and human society in the poem Beowulf.

The development of medieval medical ethics

Yet it is not until the late Middle Ages that we can speak of the development of a clearly-defined medical deontology and professional ethics resulting from two factors:

What did they sound like? Reconstructing the music of the Viking Age

This paper attempts to fill that gap by offering a reconstruction of Viking Age Scandinavian music.

Theories of the Soul vs. Medical Knowledge: Averroës as an Authority in Thirteenth-Century France

The intellectual florescence of thirteenth-century France, and Paris in particular, was vibrant, yet it confronted scholastic thinkers with a range of both new and continuing problems.

The Legendary Topography of the Viking Settlement of Iceland

This paper focuses on Icelanders’ myth of origin as presented in the various Landnámabók redactions, and explores how a largely fictional medieval text can assert ownership and control over territory, and ultimately contribute to the creation of a legendary topography.

In the Wake of Death: Socioeconomic Effects of the Black Death in Medieval England

In the years following the plague, as peasants and merchants gained more economic freedom, tensions grew between lower and upper classes of society as the upper classes stood to lose their status and way of life.

Maiden warriors in Old Norse Literature

In the Old Norse literature, the term ‘shieldmaiden’ (Skjaldmær in Icelandic) tends to be used with reference to a Viking woman warrior

Imperium et Credo: Frankish-Byzantine Rivalry over Leadership of the Roman-Christian Credo-State in the Ninth Century

The years 869-871 saw the onset of the last major diplomatic dispute between the two great powers of Christendom, the Franks in Western Europe and the Byzantines in the East. Louis

Spoliation and disseisin: possession under threat and its protection before and after 1215

Each of the two great law-making events of 1215, Magna Carta and the Fourth Lateran Council, included provisions relating to dispossession (spoliation, disseisin) and how to remedy some of its previous deficiencies.

Sewing the Scene: The Uses of Embroidery in Medieval Film

Embroidery has been used in medieval film as a means by which the main female character reclaims her autonomy.

Noble warriors: the military elite and Henry VIII’s expeditions of 1513 and 1544

This thesis is concerned with identifying and understanding the typical behaviour of the early Tudor nobility, particularly in relation to military activity.

Survival at the frontier of Holy War: political expansion, crusading, commerce and the medieval colonizing settlement at Biała Gora, North Poland 

In the southern Baltic, episodes of colonisation were accompanied by processes of military conquest, political subjugation and religious conversion.

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