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Love Between Muslim and Jew in Medieval Spain: A Triangular Affair

We will soon find that, in affairs of love as in so many others, Muslims and Jews in Christian Spain were not in an exclusive dialogue.

Marrying the Mongol Khans: Byzantine Imperial Women and the Diplomacy of Religious Conversion in the 13th and 14th Centuries

Marrying the Mongol Khans: Byzantine Imperial Women and the Diplomacy of Religious Conversion in the 13th and 14th Centuries By AnnaLinden Weller Scandanavian Journal of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies, Volume 2 (2016) Concerning this matter also a dread and authentic charge and ordinance of the great and holy Constantine is engraved upon the sacred table […]

History and Fiction in the Kings’ Sagas: The Case of Haraldr Harðráði

History and Fiction in the Kings’ Sagas: The Case of Haraldr Harðráði By Alison Finlay Saga-Book, Volume XXXIX, 2015 Haraldr harðráði was the other invader of England in 1066. If he had been as successful in his confrontation with the English king Harold Godwinsson at Stamford Bridge as he had been just five days earlier […]

The 1381 Rising in Bury St Edmunds: The Role of Leaders and the Community in Shaping the Rebellion

The 1381 Rising in Bury St Edmunds: The Role of Leaders and the Community in Shaping the Rebellion By Joe Chick PONS AELIUS: Newcastle University Postgraduate Forum E-Journal, Edition 13, 2016 Leadership is a central theme in popular perceptions of the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381. The image of the rebel leader Wat Tyler face-to-face with […]

The Economics of Guilds

The Economics of Guilds By Sheilagh Ogilvie Journal of Economic Perspectives,Volume 28, Number 4, 169–192 (2014) Occupational guilds have been observed for thousands of years in many economies: ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome; medieval and early modern India, Japan, Persia, Byzantium, and Europe; and nineteenth-century China, Latin America, and the Ottoman Empire. Guilds were most prevalent […]

‘To Avoide All Envye, Malys, Grudge and Displeasure’: Sociability and Social Networking at the London Wardmote Inquest, c.1470–1540

‘To Avoide All Envye, Malys, Grudge and Displeasure’: Sociability and Social Networking at the London Wardmote Inquest, c.1470–1540 By Charlotte Berry The London Journal, 42:3, 201-217 In 1540, the men chosen as members of the jury for the Aldersgate wardmote set down a series of regulations ‘for good rule and order to be kepte and observed […]

Holy Blood Devotion in Later Medieval Scotland

Holy Blood devotion in later medieval Scotland By Richard Oram Journal of Medieval History, Volume 43, Issue 5, 562-578 Sometime in 1440 the townsfolk of Aberdeen watched the performance of a ‘certain play of ly Haliblude played at the Windmill Hill’ just outside their burgh. Plays of such a spiritual nature were part of the established […]

What Exactly is the Forum Confessionis? Secrecy and Scandal in Church Governance

What Exactly is the Forum Confessionis? Secrecy and Scandal in Church Governance (12th – 14th Centuries) By Arnaud Fossier Academia.edu First of all, let us establish the difference between secrecy and privacy. In latin, secretum comes from secernere which means to isolate, to distinguish or to put some-thing aside. According to this etymology, «secret» or «secrecy» refers to […]

Encounters with Alcabitius: Reading Arabic Astrology in Premodern Europe

Encounters with Alcabitius: Reading Arabic Astrology in Premodern Europe By Margaret Gaida PhD Dissertation, University of Oklahoma, 2017 The most popular text on astrology in medieval Europe was al-Qabīṣī’s Kitāb al‐mudkhal ilā ṣināʿat aḥkām al‐nujūm, or Alcabitius’s Introductorius ad magisterium iudiciorum astrorum, which was translated from Arabic into Latin by John of Seville in the […]

Beekeeping from Antiquity Through the Middle Ages

Beekeeping from Antiquity Through the Middle Ages By Gene Kritsky Annual Review of Entomology, 2017. 62:249–64 Humans and honey bees have a long history of association. It is likely that proto-humans were interacting with honey bees long before the appearance of Homo sapiens, as chimpanzees will modify branches into a variety of tools to tear into […]

Medical Auxiliaries from the Physician’s Viewpoint in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Medical Texts

Medical auxiliaries from the physician’s viewpoint in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance medical texts: codifying professional skills or establishing a hierarchy? By Dina Bacalexi and Mehrnaz Katouzian-Safadi Scientiae 2017: Disciplines of knowing in the Early Modern World, Apr 2017, Padoue, Italy Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance medical treatises written by physicians contain information pertaining to various categories of […]

The Irish DNA Atlas: Revealing Fine-Scale Population Structure and History within Ireland

The Irish DNA Atlas: Revealing Fine-Scale Population Structure and History within Ireland By Edmund Gilbert, Seamus O’Reilly, Michael Merrigan, Darren McGettigan, Anne M. Molloy, Lawrence C. Brody, Walter Bodmer, Katarzyna Hutnik, Sean Ennis, Daniel J. Lawson, James F. Wilson and Gianpiero L. Cavalle Nature: Scientific Reports 7:17199, 2017 Located off the North-Western seaboard of Europe, Ireland’s geographic situation is […]

Combat in Saga Literature: Traces of martial arts in medieval Iceland

On a first glance, the Íslendingasögur can seem like a never-ending chain of feud killings, and many of the best known and most noteworthy saga scenes are scenes of combat.

The Struggle for North Africa between Almohads, Ayyubids, and Banū Ghāniya

This thesis is concerned with the invasion of the Almohad Empire by the Banū Ghāniya of Majorca and the Ayyubid amir Sharaf al-Dīn Qarāqūsh in the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries A.D.

Woman and love in medieval courtly literature: the real and the fictional

The purpose of this study is to examine the formal and thematic interaction of the poetry of medieval Arabs with Western literature through the Troubadour poets in France.

Two unnoticed pieces of medieval polyphony

The two pieces introduced and briefly discussed in this article have so far remained unnoticed because of the manner of their notation. In each case pieces of twovoice polyphony were notated with the two voices separate, instead of in the score notation which has been usual since, roughly, the second half of the twelfth century.

Harry Potter and the Legends of Saints

Along with its other generic borrowings, the Harry Potter series uses tropes and plot structures from medieval hagiography. Rowling most significantly uses hagiographical plot structures during the confrontations between Harry and Voldemort and the confrontation between Neville and Voldemort.

The Courts Christian in Medieval England

This article examines the structure and jurisdiction of the pre-Reformation ecclesiastical courts in England to determine their effect on the Reformation.

A Case of an Odd Saga: Structure in Bjarnar saga Hítdælakappa

The discussion of ‘Bjarnar saga Hítdælakappa’ structure has resulted in it being described either as a clumsily made saga or as an odd, non-mainstream saga. However, a scholastic attempt to find the narrative strategy behind the veil of clumsiness has shown that the seemingly loosely constructed narrative of the “Icelandic” part appears to be planned in a rather sophisticated and artistic way.

Between the Sultan and the Doge: Diplomats and Spies at the Time of Suleiman the Magnificent

The paper presents earliest Venetian accounts about the Ottoman empire viewed through the prism of personal contacts and links between Venetian and Ottoman diplomats and nobles.

The Piri Reis Map of 1528: A Comparative Study with Other Maps of the Time

The second world map by Piri Reis, made in 1528, as with his earlier world map of 1513, is only a remnant of a larger world map no longer extant. And, as with the first map, the surviving portion preserves areas depicting the newly discovered lands to the west of Europe.

Non ex unica natione sed ex plurimis: Genoa, the Catalans and the Knights of St John in the fifteenth century

In the fifteenth century, the hitherto usually close relations between the Genoese community and the Order of the Knights of St John were threatened by an increase in tension and incidents of violence.

The Battle of Poitiers, 1356

There are days when the course of the history of the world—or a large part of it, anyway—depends on the character, emotions, decisions, and actions of a few men in a single place.

Messengers in Later Medieval England

Varied documents other than Exchequer records expose a terminological confusion in the generic term of ‘messengers’; as a result, the nature of medieval messengership is not easy to approach.

The Dog in the Middle Ages

In my project, I will be looking at the inextricable link between dogs and humans in the Middle Ages, and how dogs had their place among humans, forged relationships with humans, and had their own function in the human world. 

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