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A Royal Gift Exchange

Natalie Anderson explores the gifts exchanged between two powerful medieval monarchs: King Henry VIII of England and Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I.

The Soul of Early Irish Monasticism

Not many people are aware that when it comes to Irish religious history, St Patrick only scratches the surface. The island in fact has a rich and fascinating Christian heritage, of which monks and sprawling monastic communities play a central role.

The Sistine Chapel: History and Meaning

The Sistine Chapel in Rome is one of the most famous monuments of the Italian Renaissance. The images which adorn the altar wall of this chapel are so ingrained in our minds and our culture that Michelangelo’s representation of Creation are found throughout popular culture.

How did so many Roman artifacts make it into the Viking Early Middle Ages?

This paper examines the evolution between the periods of antiquity, late-antiquity, and the early Middle Ages through archaeological findings.

Researchers unlock the chemistry of Irish medieval manuscripts

Hidden away among the letters and words that cover the Gaelic manuscripts of the late middle ages is a world of minerals and chemical compounds. These chemicals have their own tales to tell about the craft and ingenuity of the scribes.

1,300 Hebrew manuscript now online in bilingual website

The British Library has launched its first ever fully bilingual web resource, providing free access to its spectacular collection of Hebrew manuscripts to researchers worldwide.

Combat in Saga Literature: Traces of martial arts in medieval Iceland

On a first glance, the Íslendingasögur can seem like a never-ending chain of feud killings, and many of the best known and most noteworthy saga scenes are scenes of combat.

The Struggle for North Africa between Almohads, Ayyubids, and Banū Ghāniya

This thesis is concerned with the invasion of the Almohad Empire by the Banū Ghāniya of Majorca and the Ayyubid amir Sharaf al-Dīn Qarāqūsh in the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries A.D.

Woman and love in medieval courtly literature: the real and the fictional

The purpose of this study is to examine the formal and thematic interaction of the poetry of medieval Arabs with Western literature through the Troubadour poets in France.

Two unnoticed pieces of medieval polyphony

The two pieces introduced and briefly discussed in this article have so far remained unnoticed because of the manner of their notation. In each case pieces of twovoice polyphony were notated with the two voices separate, instead of in the score notation which has been usual since, roughly, the second half of the twelfth century.

Harry Potter and the Legends of Saints

Along with its other generic borrowings, the Harry Potter series uses tropes and plot structures from medieval hagiography. Rowling most significantly uses hagiographical plot structures during the confrontations between Harry and Voldemort and the confrontation between Neville and Voldemort.

The Courts Christian in Medieval England

This article examines the structure and jurisdiction of the pre-Reformation ecclesiastical courts in England to determine their effect on the Reformation.

A Case of an Odd Saga: Structure in Bjarnar saga Hítdælakappa

The discussion of ‘Bjarnar saga Hítdælakappa’ structure has resulted in it being described either as a clumsily made saga or as an odd, non-mainstream saga. However, a scholastic attempt to find the narrative strategy behind the veil of clumsiness has shown that the seemingly loosely constructed narrative of the “Icelandic” part appears to be planned in a rather sophisticated and artistic way.

Between the Sultan and the Doge: Diplomats and Spies at the Time of Suleiman the Magnificent

The paper presents earliest Venetian accounts about the Ottoman empire viewed through the prism of personal contacts and links between Venetian and Ottoman diplomats and nobles.

The Piri Reis Map of 1528: A Comparative Study with Other Maps of the Time

The second world map by Piri Reis, made in 1528, as with his earlier world map of 1513, is only a remnant of a larger world map no longer extant. And, as with the first map, the surviving portion preserves areas depicting the newly discovered lands to the west of Europe.

Non ex unica natione sed ex plurimis: Genoa, the Catalans and the Knights of St John in the fifteenth century

In the fifteenth century, the hitherto usually close relations between the Genoese community and the Order of the Knights of St John were threatened by an increase in tension and incidents of violence.

New archaeology festival announced in memory of pioneer Mick Aston

Sir Tony Robinson announces DigNation – a weekend festival programme of live excavations and talks on Lindisfarne in memory of friend and Time Team co-host Mick Aston.

Cosmos and Community in Early Medieval Art

Using thrones, tables, mantles, frescoes, and manuscripts, Benjamin Anderson shows how cosmological motifs informed relationships between individuals, especially the ruling elite, and communities.

Messengers in Later Medieval England

Varied documents other than Exchequer records expose a terminological confusion in the generic term of ‘messengers’; as a result, the nature of medieval messengership is not easy to approach.

The Dog in the Middle Ages

In my project, I will be looking at the inextricable link between dogs and humans in the Middle Ages, and how dogs had their place among humans, forged relationships with humans, and had their own function in the human world. 

The Bolognese Societates Armatae of the Late 13th Century

The Bologna archives preserve the bye-laws of 24 „armed societies”, dating from between 1230 and the early 1300s, written in good notary Latin. Though known to exist in other Italian city-states, only few non-Bolognese armed society bye-laws are preserved.

Income and working time of a Fencing Master in Bologna in the 15th and early 16th century

Since ancient times, the master-at-arms profession has always been considered essential for the education of the nobility and the common citizenship, especially in the Middle Ages. Yet, we know nothing about the real standard of living of these characters.

The fall of Rome and the retreat of European multiculturalism: A historical trope as a discourse of authority in public debate

This paper examines one recent incident of the use of a highly charged trope of Classical history, the Fall of the Roman Empire, as a discourse of authority in current public debates on western multicultural policies, in relation to the tragic events of the Paris terrorist attacks in Paris in November 2015.

Nutrition and the Early-Medieval Diet

The food supply of the temperate lands of early-medieval western Europe, and the ways in which its peoples dealt with the central problem of feeding themselves, has been subjected to a variety of interpretations in recent years.

The Rhythms of Vengeance in Late Medieval Marseille

Interpersonal violence was common in late medieval Marseille, as it was everywhere in Europe. In the fourteenth century, the city was riven by warfare between two great factions involving some of Marseille’s leading families.

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