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An Interactive Look at a Printed Masterpiece

Thanks to the British Museum, you can get an up close and personal look at one of the most elaborate prints ever produced.

UCLA to establish Center for the Study of Hellenic Culture

A $5 million grant from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation will enable UCLA to create the UCLA Stavros Niarchos Foundation Center for the Study of Hellenic Culture.

York Minster unveils restored grotesques

The first collection of new grotesques to be carved for York Minster’s 11 year project to conserve and restore its South Quire Aisle are being returned to the cathedral today.

Black Death spread to sub-Saharan Africa, researcher finds

After three years of work, Gérard Chouin is adamant that the medieval-era bubonic plague epidemic, the Black Death, spread to Sub-Saharan Africa and killed many people there as it did in Europe and the Mediterranean basin in the 14th century.

Archaeologists uncover Anglo-Saxon, medieval items in Suffolk

One of Europe’s largest archaeological digs this year has uncovered a rich tapestry of information about Suffolk’s history during Roman, Anglo-Saxon and Medieval times.

The making of medieval bling

Gold has long been valued for its luxurious glitter and hue, and threads of the gleaming metal have graced clothing and tapestries for centuries.

Reading the Exeter Book Riddles as Life-Writing

There is much to be gained from interpreting the tenth-century Exeter Book riddles as a characteristically biographical group of texts. They comprise a rich source of information for the study of Anglo-Saxon concepts of life courses and life stages.

Why was it important for the Byzantines to read Latin? The views of Demetrios Kydones (1324-1398)

This article will discuss how Demetrius Kydones promoted the policy of reconciliation and alliance with Western European powers against the Ottoman Turks. 

What’s in a Name?: Reflections on, and Echoes of, the Reign of Pedro I of Castile

There has been only one Pedro, Pedro I of Castile. This was no accidental oversight. The circumstances of his reign, and the passions and animosities he unleashed, assured that his name and memory would not be honored, sparing future monarchs of the taint of Pedro’s tumultuous reign.

Medieval Sermon Studies since The Sermon: A Deepening and Broadening Field

Since the publication of The Sermon in 2000, the field of medieval sermon studies has matured into a well-established and growing interdisciplinary area of medieval studies.

Clemence of Barking and Valdes of Lyon: Two Contemporaneous Examples of Innovation in the Twelfth Century

Clemence of Barking and Valdes of Lyons were strong supporters of Catholic ideals and were seeking to endorse Christian virtues. Nevertheless, their actions provide examples of innovation and a deviation from the mainstream.

Women, attorneys and credit in late medieval England

In recent years, quantitative research regarding the use of later medieval English courts has dispelled the old myth that women at law were mostly engaged in litigation over land.

‘Nec ancilla nec domina’: Representations of Eve in the Twelfth Century

This thesis seeks to demonstrate the extent to which the figure of Eve operated in twelfth-century commentary on Genesis as a crucial means by which to examine some of the most fundamental and problematic areas of the hexaemeron and fall narratives.

Artefacts could reveal closer connection between the Vikings and the Islamic world

Swedish researchers have uncovered Kufic characters, an ancient Arabic script, in artefacts from Viking Age Scandinavia. Their study also indicates that both the names ‘Allah’ and ‘Ali’ can be seen in these artefacts.

King Eystein’s Raid on Aberdeen

In the early 1150s Eysteinn Haraldsson, the eldest son of the late Harald Gille, who shared the kingship of Norway with his younger half-brothers, led a fleet across the North Sea.

Beowulf before Beowulf: Anglo-Saxon Anthroponymy and Heroic Legend

Since the inception of Beowulf scholarship approximately two hundred years ago, debate has persisted concerning the nature of the poem’s eponymous hero. Is he a historical Geatish prince or is he a fictional character inserted into a historico-legendary world?

Agatha, Clerical ‘Wife’ and Wet Nurse to King John of England, Longtime Companion to Godfrey de Lucy, Bishop of Winchester

Agatha is the earliest royal wet nurse for whom at least a faint sketch of her life can be drawn, and she presents a rare view of a non-noble, non-royal, non-religious English woman of the late twelfth- and early thirteenth centuries.

Topping Off a Tournament

In the tournament, a crest was an unusual and eye-catching piece of a knight’s equipment.

Sacred Values: Medieval Archaeology and Religious Heritage

Why do we value, conserve and interpret medieval sacred heritage? What is the potential significance of medieval archaeology to contemporary social issues surrounding religious identity, and how does this impact on archaeology? 

A Rabbi, a Priest, and an Imam Walk into a Coffee Shop: Talking about Other People’s Religions in the Middle Ages

This lecture focuses on three medieval scholars – one rabbi, one priest, and one imam – who had a lot to say about their rival religions, arguing that there is much more going on when they did so than just ugly denunciation.

‘Becoming English’: Nationality, Terminology, and Changing Sides in the Late Middle Ages

Late medieval English chronicles contain several puzzling references to the idea of people ‘becoming English’ by changing allegiance, usually in the context of war.

Women in Domesday

Four women may be taken as typical of the sort of information Domesday includes, and the sort of women on whom it focusses.

Law and Mental Competency in Late Medieval England

Between the late thirteenth century and 1540, when Henry VIII established the Court of Wards and Liveries, the English royal courts oversaw hundreds of inquisitions involving individuals thought to be idiots or ‘natural fools’.

The Nineteenth Century Memory of Renaissance Italian Warfare: Ercole Ricotti and Jacob Burckhardt

Renaissance Italian military history is a sad story of devolution, culminating in conquest by foreign powers. It stands as a “distant mirror” of the foreign oppression endured by nineteenth century Risorgimento Italy, when the academic study of Renaissance military history first began.

Mensuration in Early Medieval Barcelona

Various units of length are found in use in early medieval Barcelona, but the dexter is by far the most common. However, the interpretation of its value is by no means straightforward.

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