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Archives for June 2017

Illuminating Women in the Medieval World at the Getty

New exhibit open now at the Getty Museum! Illuminating Women in the Medieval World June 20-September 17, 2017 Curated by Christine Sciacca Modern portrayals of medieval women tend toward stereotypical images of damsels in distress, mystics in convents, female laborers in the fields, and even women of ill repute. In fact, women’s roles in the […]

How to Murder a Byzantine Emperor

Three tales of murder from the Byzantine court.

A Fortress Built of Salt

The mountains and hills of Spain are covered in many little towns. They are more than picturesque; so charming that they’re almost saccharine. In some of these little towns, which used to be great town centers in the medieval past, there are towering reminders of their previous glory. In the town of Cardona in Catalonia, […]

The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, No. 11) : London Strong

Features: Cool off and kick off summer with Swimming in the Middle Ages & 
Learn about the Valkyries in: The Women of Völsunga Saga
Exhibits: Illuminating Women in the Medieval World at the Getty
Books: Review of Everyday Life in Tudor London
Travel: Visiting SoCal’s Koroneburg Renaissance Festival

The Medieval History of Stonehenge

How was Stonehenge perceived in the Middle Ages? Was it simply abandoned to the passage of time?

New Medieval Books: Historical Fiction, Part 2

Five more new historical fiction novels…

Nine Things You Didn’t Know Were Medieval

From vegetarian meat substitutes to beach parties – find out what came from the Middle Ages!

Medieval Dog Tricks

Can your dog dig up rings, dance to music, or tell if a lady is pregnant? Find out what strange tricks dogs could perform in the Middle Ages.

The many faces of Duchess Matilda: matronage, motherhood and mediation in the twelfth century

In this book I argue that the varied visual and textual source material related to Matilda (1156-1189) provides an insight into her duties and responsibilities at her husband’s court.

Frail or hale: Skeletal frailty indices in Medieval London skeletons

The representative nonmonastic, or lay, community in Medieval London comprises samples from Guildhall Yard (1140–1350 CE), Spital Square (1200–1500 CE), St. Mary Graces (1350–1538 CE), and St. Benet Sherehog (1250–1666 CE).

New Medieval Books: Historical Fiction

Escape this summer to the Middle Ages with these five historical fiction novels…

Tips on being a good CEO from a medieval abbot

In many ways, Abbot Samson would resemble the Chief Executive Officer of a company – indeed, he was actually running a corporation that would have been worth tens of millions of pounds in today’s money

Brewing Viking beer — with stones

There’s nothing archaeologists like better than piles of centuries-old rubbish. Ancient bones and stones from trash heaps can tell complex stories. And in central Norway, at least, the story seems to be that Vikings and their descendants brewed beer by tossing hot rocks into wooden kettles

Pillaging Public Perceptions: Finding Your Career as a Medievalist

The story of how I made the jump from trained academic to designing coloring books

Enviable Possessions: The Thirteenth-Century Gemellions of Limoges

One of the most common images of ritual hand-washing in the medieval period depicts the Gospel account of the Roman procurator Pontius Pilate washing his hands after condemning Jesus to death.

A Dynasty of Saints

By all accounts, St. Æthelthryth was married twice and remained a virgin. During her life she was a princess of East Anglia, queen of Northumbria, and finally abbess and founder of the monastery at Ely.

The Light of Nature? No ‘Experience’ in the Middle Ages!

When we think of the concept of experience, we would most likely not be thinking of the Middle Ages.

Policing Violence: Royal and Community Perspectives in Medieval France

It is the purpose of this thesis to demonstrate that there were legitimate and acceptable forms of violence that could be used to police society.

Naming Particulars: A Thirteenth-Century Debate on Whether Individuals Have Proper Names

This dissertation is about a debate that occurred in thirteenth-century philosophy over an apparently bizarre question: Can individuals really have proper names?

The dragon’s skull: how can zooarchaeologists contribute to our understanding of otherness in the Middle Ages?

This paper explores how the study of animal bones, and the material practices associated with responses to other species, can build on the foundations of existing scholarship on otherness, alterity and monstrosity. 

New Medieval Books: To be an artist or a warrior

This week’s look at five books about the Middle Ages

Medieval Tightrope Walking

Even in the Middle Ages one can find accounts of people doing death-defying stunts for our entertainment.

Medieval and modern concepts of rights: how do they differ?

The concept of a right has not changed since the middle ages and neither have the kinds of justifications given for recognising rights.

The Newberry Library Announces Year-Long ‘Religious Change’ Project

Coinciding with the 500th anniversary of Luther’s 95 Theses, the project will include public programs, digital resources, and a gallery exhibition The Newberry Library in Chicago, Illinois announces the public launch of Religious Change, 1450 – 1700, a multidisciplinary project drawing on the full range of the library’s programs, services, and staff expertise. Coinciding with […]

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