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Virtus sermonis and the Trinity: Marsilius of Inghen and the Semantics of Late Fourteenth-Century Theology

Virtus sermonis and the Trinity: Marsilius of Inghen and the Semantics of Late Fourteenth-Century Theology

J. F. M. Hoenen, Maarten

Medieval Philosophy and Theology 10 (2001)

Abstract

The normative use of the Church Fathers and the theologi approbati, who were among the most important auctoritates next to the Scriptures, demonstrates that late-medieval theologians were faithful to tradition. This predilection for tradition was affirmed by, and institutionalized in, the university, where a fixed list of texts was read and commented upon across generations. While other disciplines also showed a tendency toward traditionalism, late-medieval theologians relied heavily on the traditional thinking that rested on the basic principle of a science dealing with God. That is, the source of theology should be found in divine revelation and divinely inspired tradition rather than any sort of human imagination.

 

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