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Five Things to Know About Gerald of Wales

Gerald of Wales, or Giraldus Cambrensis, was a twelfth-century cleric who wrote a whole raft of influential works on clerical reform, kingship, and history.

Reframing the Conversation on Medieval Military Strategy

This question of the history of strategy is a question of intellectual history: did medieval writers generate and transmit derivative and/or original ideas about how to wage war?

Episcopal Virginity in Medieval England

The literature on medieval sainthood is substantial, rich and varied, but on one point it is almost unanimous: sexuality, and in particular virginity, was of far greater significance to female saints than to their male counterparts.

The ‘joyous entry’ of Archduke Maximilian into Antwerp (13 January 1478): an analysis of a ‘most elegant and dignified’ dialogue

An in-depth analysis of a contemporary account of Maximilian’s joyous entry into Antwerp (13 January 1478) adds a new perspective to historiography by showing how the public urban spaces functioned as complex social products.

Which Witch?: Morgan le Fay as Shape-Shifter and English Perceptions of Magic Reflected in Arthurian Legend

The name Morgan le Fay holds many meanings and has appeared in various forms throughout the course of medieval and modern history.

Serbian scientific institutions and medieval research

Since the beginning of critical historiography, Serbian researchers and historians have dealt with the medieval history of Serbia, Serbian lands, and of its neighboring countries,

The Challenge of Folklore to Medieval Studies

When folklore began to emerge as a valid expression of a people during the early stages of national romanticism, it did so alongside texts and artifacts from the Middle Ages; it was only as folklore began to develop its own methodology during the nineteenth century that the fields were distinguished.

Eddic Poetry as World Literature

This article focuses on eddic issues including orality, dating, relationship to the ballad, provenance, international sources, and broadly typological literary relations.

The fall of Rome and the retreat of European multiculturalism: A historical trope as a discourse of authority in public debate

This paper examines one recent incident of the use of a highly charged trope of Classical history, the Fall of the Roman Empire, as a discourse of authority in current public debates on western multicultural policies, in relation to the tragic events of the Paris terrorist attacks in Paris in November 2015.

Archery in the Preface to Procopius’ Wars: A Figured Image of Agonistic Authorship

This article is a case study in the problems that can arise when a narrow interpretive lens is brought to historical texts by modern historians interested primarily in the facts of military history.

Making or Breaking a King: Kingship Ideals in Anglo-Saxon Historiography

This research will fit into the niche between works on specific kings and the analyses of those texts pertaining directly to them, since it will add a comparative angle. It will discover the ways in which written medieval sources created a literary image of a king, as opposed to only preserving the facts.

Medieval Sermon Studies since The Sermon: A Deepening and Broadening Field

Since the publication of The Sermon in 2000, the field of medieval sermon studies has matured into a well-established and growing interdisciplinary area of medieval studies.

The Nineteenth Century Memory of Renaissance Italian Warfare: Ercole Ricotti and Jacob Burckhardt

Renaissance Italian military history is a sad story of devolution, culminating in conquest by foreign powers. It stands as a “distant mirror” of the foreign oppression endured by nineteenth century Risorgimento Italy, when the academic study of Renaissance military history first began.

Pilgrim and patron: Cnut in post-conquest historical writing

This article examines a number of short narratives from the late eleventh and early twelfth centuries which relate to the activities of Cnut as king of England.

Letters from the Otherworld: Arthur and Henry II in Stephen of Rouen’s Draco Normannicus

The poem Draco Normannicus includes a correspondence between King Arthur, now ruler of the Antipodes, and Henry II.

Past and Present in Mid-Byzantine Chronicles: Change in Narrative Technique and the Transmission of Knowledge

Particular emphasis will be placed on the Chronicle of Theophanes the Confessor and the Chronicle of Symeon the Logothete.

The Historiography of Crisis: Jordanes, Cassiodorus and Justinian in mid sixth-century Constantinople

This article presents a new interpretation of the historiographical production of Jordanes by situating it in the political and social environment of Constantinople of the years 550-552.

Was There History in the Middle Ages?

Did medieval writers think they were writing history? Emily A. Winkler takes a closer look at the various forms of ‘history’ during this period.

Gregory of Tours, the Eastern Emperor, and Merovingian Gaul

This article explores Gregory’s passages on imperial Rome and argues that they were intended to highlight the virtues and vices of particular Merovingian kings in comparison with particular Roman emperors.

The use and the abuse of history, national heritage and nationalism

‘Icelanders or Norwegians? Leifur, Snorri and national identity then and now’ followed by a panel discussion

The Quennells and the ‘History of Everyday Life’ in England, c. 1918–69

The Quennells and the ‘History of Everyday Life’ in England, c. 1918–69 By Laura Carter History Workshop Journal, Issue 81 (2016) Introduction: A new social history developed in mid twentieth-century England, one that has seldom been taken seriously by historiographers of social history. The ‘history of everyday life’ involved disparate threads that are challenging to weave […]

Visions in a Ninth-Century Village: an Early Medieval Microhistory

This article however suggests that an account of a ninth-century peasant’s vision can be read to recover a microhistory of a rural priest in northern Francia, and draws out the implications for how the local societies of the period might be viewed.

‘The revolt of the medievalists’: Directions in recent research on the twelfth-century renaissance

Ever since Wallace K. Ferguson contributed to making ‘the revolt of the medievalists’ a slogan for the medievalists’ attack on the modernity of Jacob Burckhardt’s Italian renaissance, the question of ‘renaissance’ or ‘renaissances’ has been much discussed.

King Æthelstan in the English, Continental and Scandinavian Traditions of the Tenth to the Thirteenth Centuries

Using close textual analysis, this thesis has identified similarities and differences in the ways in which the Anglo-Saxon king, Æthelstan, is depicted in narrative sources from England, the Continent and Scandinavia during the tenth to the thirteenth centuries

Autumn of the Middle Ages: A Century Later

Taking a look at the influence of Johan Huizinga’s Autumn of the Middle Ages.

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