Five medieval websites to explore


Here are five medieval history websites with some great content. A few are very new, while others have been around a few years:

1) The Riddle Ages

Created by Megan Cavell, this new site is offering scholarly-produced, accessible translations and commentary for the Old English riddles. They have just a few riddles posted so far, but some of the most important scholars in this field will be posting to it, so keep checking back!

A good post to start with is A Brief Introduction to Riddles

cottesimple2) La Cotte Simple: Late Medieval Fashion Redressed

Created by Tasha Dandelion Kelly, this is perhaps the most indepth website on 14th and 15th century European fashion. You can find articles and tutorials about making historically-accurate medieval clothing, including:

An English noble lady’s outfit circa 1480

Making a dress from your bust-supportive bodice pattern

3) Eat Medieval

For those who love food from the Middle Ages – this site is group production by those working on the recently discovered 12th century manuscript containing cooking recipes (see Food Recipes from the 12th-century discovered in manuscript)

Here is how you make sausages!




4) Gothic Paris

Created by Sarah-Grace Heller, it allows you to take a look at the streets of Paris circa 1292, based on tax and administrative records.

5) Medieval London: Reading the Records

Created by  Robert Ellis, this site is producing transcriptions and translations from entries in one of the City of London’s Letter Books – a set of records kept by the city that detail their laws, what was happening in the city, and various administrative functions – like noting a will, or a lease of a property. Hopefully this site will expand, as the  City of London has some very interesting records about daily life in the late medieval urban area.

See also Five new websites for medievalists

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