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The Acts of Matthew and Andrew in the City of Cannibals

The Acts of Matthew and Andrew in the City of Cannibals

Sharp, Tom

Medieval Forum Vol.2 (2003)

Abstract

In the second century after the death of Jesus, legends arose to fill the gaps about which the New Testament is silent, particularly the experiences of the apostles whom Jesus had instructed to “make disciples of all nations” (Matthew 28:19), even “to the ends of the earth” (Acts 1:8). These legends of the apostles entertained early Christians for hundreds of years. The story of The Acts of Matthew and Andrew in the City of Cannibals was written down in Greek probably shortly before 400 A.D. by an Egyptian monk. The city of cannibals was Marmadonia, thought to be a town in Scythia, now in eastern Crimea; Andrew starts his journey from the land of Achaia, a region of Scythia on the east coast of the Black Sea. Presented here is a translation into modern English that follows the Old English translation of a lost Latin translation of the Greek text.

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