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Medieval Universities: Privileged, Distinctive and Embedded

Medieval Universities: Privileged, Distinctive and Embedded

Paper by Miri Rubin

Given at Queen Mary University of London on July 20, 2015

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This lecture will introduce medieval universities from their beginnings in England, France and Italy and on to the Renaissance when Europe has produced some seventy such institutions of higher education. The lecture will also address questions of still current interest:

  • How is learning to be turned into a job and career?
  • How are poor students to be supported?
  • How are youthful students best transformed into serious scholars?
  • Who should support higher education?
  • What is the appropriate balance between abstract learning – interesting and even virtuous per se – and study oriented towards jobs in church and state?
  • What are the criteria for academic freedom?
  • What is the pedagogic value of memory and memorizing
  • How does university experience set up networks ‘for life’
  • Are universities necessarily the antithesis to ‘life-long-learning’
  • Can universities combine ‘apprenticeship’ with ex cathedra teaching?
  • Can any European model ever be without considerable regional variation?

Here is another vision of the same paper, with a focus on the slides accompanying the talk:

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