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Exhibit: Shakespeare In Ten Acts at the British Library

This year marks the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare (1564-1616). The British Library has honoured his contribution to English literature and the stage in a celebratory exhibition that runs until September 6th. British Library curators, Julian Harrison and Zoë Wilcox, have crafted an impressive exhibit that covers Shakespeare’s importance in ten acts.

Anne of Brittany, Queen of France

This week brings us two articles from Susan Abernethy on Anne of Brittany. This first article details Anne’s life.

Letter Written by Sir George Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury to His Wife, Bess of Hardwick, 1568

Susan Abernethy’s latest piece looks at a letter from Sir George Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury to his wife, lady-in-waiting to Elizabeth I, Bess Hardwick.

The Life of Lady Katherine Gordon

This week, Susan Abernethy brings us an article on Lady Katherine Gordon.

The Global Side of Medieval at the Getty Centre: Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts

Los Angeles correspondent, Danielle Trynoski takes through the, ‘Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts’ exhibut at the Getty Museum.

The Funeral of Queen Elizabeth of York, the First Tudor Queen of England

Elizabeth of York, Queen to King Henry VII of England, died in the Tower of London on February 11, 1503. She had given birth to a daughter Katherine on February 2 and never recovered. The death was a shock to her husband, her children and to the nation.

Interview with Nancy Goldstone, author of The Rival Queens

It wasn’t until I was older, and writing European history, that I stumbled across a mention in the chronicle of Matthew Paris, a 13th century Benedictine monk, of the four daughters of the count of Provence who all became queens—queen of France, queen of England, queen of Germany (queen of the Romans), and queen of Sicily. Even from the little I was able to glean from the chronicle I could see that these women, who I had never heard of, exercised real power. Instantly curious, I went to find a book about them.

Celebrating the New Year, Medieval Style

A look at New Year’s in the Middle Ages.

Unknown Europe: The Mapping of the Northern countries by Olaus Magnus in 1539

Olaus Magnus, a highly educated Swedish priest and scholar, published his geographically and ethnographically remarkable map of the Northern countries, the Carta marina, in Venice in 1539.

The Tragic Story of Joanna the Mad

Joanna’s mental illness has been a subject of debate across the centuries.

The most popular boys’ names in Tudor England

What were the most popular names for boys in England during the 16th century?

The most popular girls’ names in Tudor England

What were the most popular names for girls in England during the 16th century?

The Quirky Questions of Wynkyn de Worde

From the ‘chicken or egg’ question to age of a mouse, some of the riddles from England’s oldest joke book.

Anne Boleyn’s Songbook

Now for the first time in 500 years much of the music included in Anne Boleyn’s songbook has been recorded by the Alamire Consort, under the direction of Dr. David Skinner of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge University.

Which 16th-century Monarch Would You Be?

Find out which sixteenth century monarch most closely matches your style.

Recipes from The Tudor Kitchen

Get recipes on A Dysschefull of Snowe – Strawberries on Snow and Steamed Asparagus Spears in Orange Sauce

What do Cod Bones from the Mary Rose tell us about the global fish trade?

New stable isotope and ancient DNA analysis of the bones of stored cod provisions recovered from the wreck of the Tudor warship Mary Rose, which sank off the coast of southern England in 1545, has revealed that the fish in the ship’s stores had been caught in surprisingly distant waters

Fireworks in Scotland date back to 1507, researchers find

Previously experts believed that fireworks were first used in Stirling in 1566, however, new evidence suggests that it was actually around 59 years earlier and in the Scottish capital. It is thought that ‘fireballs’ featured in a great tournament staged by King James lV, which took place at the base of Castle Rock, in 1507, in the area which is now the King’s Stables Road.

Movie Review: Dangerous Beauty

Late 16th century Venice, where a woman can be a nun, a wife or a courtesan. For Veronica Franco, the free spirited girl scorned by because of her lack of wealth, the choice is an obvious one…

Veronica Franco and the ‘Cortigiane Oneste’: Attaining Power through Prostitution in Sixteenth-Century Venice

Franco was a published author, a poet, and counted the King of France among her lovers.

Caterina Sforza’s Experiments with Alchemy

She collected over four hundred alchemical, medicinal, and cosmetic recipes, and corresponded with other alchemical adepts about materials and laboratory techniques.

Foundation Myths in Medieval and Renaissance Italy

The 3 papers featured here looked at the development of the civic identities of Florence, Genoa and Rome through art, architecture and foundation legends.

Fashion Old and New: Weaving and Tailoring in the Early Medieval and Early Modern Period

Fashion fan? Interested in medieval and early modern textiles? Then this was your session. 2 papers from opposite ends of the spectrum: Early Medieval weaving and Early Modern Tailoring.

Dynastic Politics: Five Women of the Howard Family During the Reign of Henry VIII, 1509-1547

The Howards were the most important noble dynasty of Henry VIII’s reign. Tudor political history cannot be written without them; they lived their lives at its core, in the shadow of the Crown.

Witchcraft on the High Seas: The Voyage of King James and the North Berwick Witch Trials

Being a man with a strong curiosity, James was personally involved with the witch trials, which was unusual for a monarch. More than one hundred people were arrested and accused.

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