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King Eystein’s Raid on Aberdeen

In the early 1150s Eysteinn Haraldsson, the eldest son of the late Harald Gille, who shared the kingship of Norway with his younger half-brothers, led a fleet across the North Sea.

5 stunning Scottish castles you can only reach by boat

Standing as lone sentinels on lochs or islands these ancestral homes have stood for hundreds of years, with their location making them difficult to reach.

Archaeologists unearth medieval treasures at Pictish fort

Scottish archaeologists exploring a Pictish fort have discovered surprising treasures, including an eleven-hundred year old coin.

St Columba’s cell revealed by archaeologists

This discovery is massive. St Columba is a key figure in Western Christendom. He was the national patron saint of Scotland in the Middle Ages.

White, Black and Grey: recent discoveries at Aberdeen’s medieval friaries

Recent excavations at Robert Gordon’s College in Aberdeen have revealed 30 burials from the medieval Dominican (Black) friary as well as hints at remains of the buildings. This talk will present the latest evidence from this site and look at the other excavated medieval friaries, Franciscan (Grey) and Carmelite (white).

Heads, shoulders, knees and toes: Injury and death in Anglo-Scottish combat, c.1296-c.1403

For all that has been written about this period, little, however, has been produced regarding the realities of war, the impact that it had on the individual soldier, or the wounds suffered by those who engaged in these conflicts.

Scotland’s most important medieval charters now on display

For the first time precious examples from two of Scotland’s most important collections of medieval charters are going on show in National Records of Scotland.

Campaign begins to keep Viking hoard in Scotland

Campaigners are calling for one of the most spectacular Viking hoards ever discovered in Scotland to have its home near where it was found in Dumfries and Galloway.

When St Andrews was the heart of medieval Scotland

Medieval St Andrews provides a pathway to an increased understanding of the medieval world.

Assembling places and persons: a tenth-century Viking boat burial from Swordle Bay on the Ardnamurchan peninsula, western Scotland

A rare, intact Viking boat burial in western Scotland contained a rich assemblage of grave goods, providing clues to the identity and origins of both the interred individual and the people who gathered to create the site.

Discovery of Lost Early Medieval Kingdom in Galloway

Archaeological research has just been published which reveals the location of a hitherto lost early medieval kingdom that was once pre-eminent in Scotland and Northern England.

The Tower-House Castle: Not Exactly Fit for a King

House, Tower, Castle. It’s like a weird hand of Cards Against Humanity or Apples to Apples but these special types of castles are common in Scotland and Ireland. The 13th century concentric castles of Edward I, a.k.a. Longshanks, a.k.a. Hammer of the Scots, are some of the most well-known surviving medieval structures. His castles are […]

The European History of Medieval and Renaissance Scotland: A Post Brexit Reflection

Kylie Murray speaking on Scotland and its relationship with Europe in the Middle Ages.

BOOK REVIEW: Pilgrim Routes of the British Isles by Emma J. Wells

What was pilgrimage like in the Middle Ages? Do modern day routes faithfully retrace the steps of long ago pilgrims? How has pilgrimage changed over the course of hundreds of years? Tourist? Pilgrim? Or both? What is the meaning of pilgrimage today?

Letter Written by Sir George Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury to His Wife, Bess of Hardwick, 1568

Susan Abernethy’s latest piece looks at a letter from Sir George Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury to his wife, lady-in-waiting to Elizabeth I, Bess Hardwick.

Yolande de Dreux, Queen of Scots

Susan Abernethy brings us back to medieval Scotland once again to look at another Scottish Queen, Yolande de Dreux.

Marie de Coucy, Queen of Scots

Susan Abernethy brings us the story of Alexander II of Scotland’s French Queen, Marie de Coucy.

The Life of Lady Katherine Gordon

This week, Susan Abernethy brings us an article on Lady Katherine Gordon.

A Viking Mess – Northmen: A Viking Saga Movie Review

This week’s medieval movie is Northmen: A Viking Saga.

The Norwegian Attack on Iona in 1209-10: The Last Viking Raid?

A closer look at what happened in and around Iona in the early 1200s, makes the interpretation that this was just another such ‘classic viking raid’ rather unlikely.

Bulls, bere and black oatmeal: Iona’s economy in the later Middle Ages

This paper will take a brief look at some of the landholdings of both the abbey and the nunnery, and at how they were used – and perhaps misused – over this period.

Sweetheart Abbey Breviary acquired by National Library of Scotland

A monastic treasure written in Scotland 700 years ago has been acquired by the National Library of Scotland.

The Law of Treason in the English Border Counties in the Later Middle Ages

The formulation of a general and comprehensive law of treason by the English government in the mid-fourteenth century allowed northerners to impose harsh penalties on those who offended them most grievously.

Institutionally Constrained Technology Adoption: Resolving the Longbow Puzzle

Historians have long puzzled over why this missile weapon—clearly superior to its alternative, the crossbow—was monopolized by the English for so long

Celebrating the New Year, Medieval Style

A look at New Year’s in the Middle Ages.

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