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‘Viking Age Destruction’ found to have preserved key parts of Scotland’s largest Pictish fort

When one of Scotland’s most powerful Pictish forts was destroyed by fire in the 10th century – a time when Vikings are known to have been raiding the Moray coastline – it brought to a rapid end a way of life which had endured for centuries.

From reformed barbarian to “saint-king”: literary portrayals of King Malcolm III Canmore (r. 1058-93) in Scottish historical narratives, c. 1100- 1449

It examines how King Malcolm went from being considered a barbaric king of Scots reformed by the influence of his second wife, Saint Margaret of Scotland (d. 1093), to the Scottish prince exiled in England by Macbeth (r. 1040-1057/8).

10 things you might not know about British cathedrals

Discover 10 curious facts you might not know about Great Britain’s most famous cathedrals.

The Penny in the Pennylands: Coinage in Scotland in the Early Middle Ages

Other terms of account, such as shilling, mancus, mark and ora are to be found in Old English documents, but the silver penny was tile only coin to be issued, and remained so until the groat was introduced by Edward I in 1279.

Historiography of Falkirk (1298) as the Predecessor to Infantry Dominance

For more than a century, historians have identified the Battle of Falkirk (1298) as a turning point in infantry tactics, not only for the Scots but also for warfare in the Western World.

Lollardy, Hussitism and the Scottish Inquisition, c.1390-c.1527

Despite a peculiar constellation of factors that make Scotland in this period quite unique, and because of a patchy and fragmentary archival record, scholars have paid virtually no attention to Scotland when considering those issues that have shaped the historiography of medieval Europe.

High-tech scans reveal secrets of medieval burial stones in Scotland

The latest digital photography techniques applied to the ancient burial stones at Inchinnan Parish Church in western Scotland have revealed that one of the stones, thought to be medieval in date, was originally carved much earlier..

The Drosten Stone, St Vigeans: A cultural hybrid

The inscriptions on the Drosten Stone have inspired extensive scholarship, but little study has been devoted to the possible meanings behind the Pictish art depicted on the stone.

The Battle of Culloden in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery – Part 2: The Battle and Aftermath

This lady’s story is one of courage and Jacobite patriotism; without her, the Prince may never succeed in making his voyage to Skye, which inspired the folk song quoted in the beginning.

The Battle of Culloden in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery – Part 1: Prelude

When day dawned on April 16th, 1746, what would be the final pitched battle on the British soil took place on the field of Culloden near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands.

Why is Scotland so often absent in studies of Britain and Europe in the early medieval period?

David Clarke examines the question of why Scotland is so often absent from larger studies of early medieval Europe.

Holy Blood Devotion in Later Medieval Scotland

Holy Blood devotion in later medieval Scotland By Richard Oram Journal of Medieval History, Volume 43, Issue 5, 562-578 Sometime in 1440 the townsfolk of Aberdeen watched the performance of a ‘certain play of ly Haliblude played at the Windmill Hill’ just outside their burgh. Plays of such a spiritual nature were part of the established […]

King Eystein’s Raid on Aberdeen

In the early 1150s Eysteinn Haraldsson, the eldest son of the late Harald Gille, who shared the kingship of Norway with his younger half-brothers, led a fleet across the North Sea.

5 stunning Scottish castles you can only reach by boat

Standing as lone sentinels on lochs or islands these ancestral homes have stood for hundreds of years, with their location making them difficult to reach.

Archaeologists unearth medieval treasures at Pictish fort

Scottish archaeologists exploring a Pictish fort have discovered surprising treasures, including an eleven-hundred year old coin.

St Columba’s cell revealed by archaeologists

This discovery is massive. St Columba is a key figure in Western Christendom. He was the national patron saint of Scotland in the Middle Ages.

White, Black and Grey: recent discoveries at Aberdeen’s medieval friaries

Recent excavations at Robert Gordon’s College in Aberdeen have revealed 30 burials from the medieval Dominican (Black) friary as well as hints at remains of the buildings. This talk will present the latest evidence from this site and look at the other excavated medieval friaries, Franciscan (Grey) and Carmelite (white).

Heads, shoulders, knees and toes: Injury and death in Anglo-Scottish combat, c.1296-c.1403

For all that has been written about this period, little, however, has been produced regarding the realities of war, the impact that it had on the individual soldier, or the wounds suffered by those who engaged in these conflicts.

Scotland’s most important medieval charters now on display

For the first time precious examples from two of Scotland’s most important collections of medieval charters are going on show in National Records of Scotland.

Campaign begins to keep Viking hoard in Scotland

Campaigners are calling for one of the most spectacular Viking hoards ever discovered in Scotland to have its home near where it was found in Dumfries and Galloway.

When St Andrews was the heart of medieval Scotland

Medieval St Andrews provides a pathway to an increased understanding of the medieval world.

Assembling places and persons: a tenth-century Viking boat burial from Swordle Bay on the Ardnamurchan peninsula, western Scotland

A rare, intact Viking boat burial in western Scotland contained a rich assemblage of grave goods, providing clues to the identity and origins of both the interred individual and the people who gathered to create the site.

Discovery of Lost Early Medieval Kingdom in Galloway

Archaeological research has just been published which reveals the location of a hitherto lost early medieval kingdom that was once pre-eminent in Scotland and Northern England.

The Tower-House Castle: Not Exactly Fit for a King

House, Tower, Castle. It’s like a weird hand of Cards Against Humanity or Apples to Apples but these special types of castles are common in Scotland and Ireland. The 13th century concentric castles of Edward I, a.k.a. Longshanks, a.k.a. Hammer of the Scots, are some of the most well-known surviving medieval structures. His castles are […]

The European History of Medieval and Renaissance Scotland: A Post Brexit Reflection

Kylie Murray speaking on Scotland and its relationship with Europe in the Middle Ages.

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