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Cardinals and the War of Ferrara

The bestowal of a red hat can turn even the most humbly born cleric into an ecclesiastical prince, but whereas few cardinals of the modern era have been born princely, most of those created in the Renaissance period could claim to be of noble lineage.

Medieval Manuscripts: Epiphany in The Great Hours of Anne of Brittany

The Great Hours of Anne of Brittany is undoubtedly a masterpiece of French painting, as is fitting for a manuscript intended for someone who was twice queen of France: with Charles VIII and then Louis XII.

Aspects and Problems of the Templars’ Religious Presence in Medieval Europe from the Twelfth to the Early Fourteenth Century

What has been neglected in the debate on military order religion is a more focused discussion of how the religion of individual military orders was understood and experienced by outsiders through the ecclesiastical property these orders possessed and the devotional spaces they created and maintained.

Medieval Manuscripts: The Massacre of the Innocents and Flight into Egypt in the Bible moralisée of Naples

Taking a look at how the 14th century Bible moralisée of Naples portrays two episodes of Jesus’ life after his birth.

Early medieval writings of the First Apocalypse of James discovered

The first-known original Greek copy of an early Christian writing describing Jesus’ secret teachings to his brother James has been discovered at Oxford University

Recovering the Histories of Women Religious in England in the Central Middle Ages: Wilton Abbey and Goscelin of Saint-Bertin

Building upon the efforts made by scholars over the past twenty years to enrich our understanding of literary cultures fostered within English communities of women religious during the central Middle Ages, this article offers evidence of these women keeping their communities’ histories and preserving their saints’ cults through their own writing.

The Reconciliation of Reason and Faith in Gothic Period of Medieval Europe

The term Gothic refers to a style of art and architecture and to the period of their development in western Europe, which lasted from the middle of twelfth century into the fourteenth century in Italy and later in other European countries. During the period, there appeared one conflict-reason verse faith.

What Medieval Ghosts can tell us about the Afterlife

People in the Middle Ages told tales of seeing and talking with ghosts. While these encounters could be quite scary, it was also an opportunity from them to learn about the afterlife.

Sacred Values: Medieval Archaeology and Religious Heritage

Why do we value, conserve and interpret medieval sacred heritage? What is the potential significance of medieval archaeology to contemporary social issues surrounding religious identity, and how does this impact on archaeology? 

A Rabbi, a Priest, and an Imam Walk into a Coffee Shop: Talking about Other People’s Religions in the Middle Ages

This lecture focuses on three medieval scholars – one rabbi, one priest, and one imam – who had a lot to say about their rival religions, arguing that there is much more going on when they did so than just ugly denunciation.

Did Crusaders get Tattoos? Devotional Symbols and Practices in Medieval Europe and the Holy Land

I explore what appears to be a largely overlooked aspect of devotional practice associated with the medieval crusading movement.

Christ as Priest in Byzantine church decoration of the 11th and 12th centuries

The 11th century was a watershed in the Byzantine church decoration.

Did everyone believe in religion in medieval Europe?

One common idea about medieval Europe was that everyone were firm believers in religion. If you were a Christian, then you accepted your faith without question.

No Strings Attached: Emotional Interaction with Animated Sculptures of Crucified Christ

Such life-size Christs were not just the stuff of dreams (or nightmares), but have existed in Europe throughout the middle ages – massive wooden bodies, from the size of a small adult up to three metres tall, were habitually hung on the crosses above the nave.

Private Passions: The Contemplation of Suffering in Medieval Affective Devotions

This dissertation examines the representation of suffering in medieval affective devotional texts.

Virtual Pilgrimage through the Jerusalem Cityscape

This essay considers a group of images depicting the Passion that are, at one level, quite disparate: they are executed in different media, in vastly different sizes, and with different target audiences.

Fish on Friday I: Economic Blessing or Dietary Sacrifice?

A lack of red meat on the medieval table meant the diners were having a humble meal, and fish was a convenient substitute protein.

Book Review: A Medieval Woman’s Companion by Susan Signe Morrison

Susan Signe Morrison’s book, “A Medieval Woman’s Companion” brings the contributions of medieval women, famous and obscure, to the forefront in this fantastic introductory text.

A Garden Enclosed, A Fountain Sealed Up: Paradoxical and Generative Metaphors of Enclosure in Medieval Female Anchoritism

The anchoritic life was a particular manifestation of the secluded or eremitical life.

The 
Privileging
 of 
Visio
 over
 Vox 
in
 the 
Mystical
 Experiences
 of
 Hildegard 
of 
Bingen 
and
 Joan
 of
 Arc

Even
 though
 medieval
 women
 mystics
 have
 enjoyed
 increased
 attention
 in
 recent
 scholarly
 discussion, 
a
 topic
 that
 still
 has
 not
 been
 tackled
 is
 the
 possible
 difference
 between
 seeing
 a
 vision
 and
 hearing
 a
 voice
 during
 a
 mystical
 experience
 and
 the
 ramifications
 of
 this
 difference 
in
 the
 context 
of
 medieval
 text 
production
 and 
in
 the
 status
 of
 mystics
 as
 authors.


Good versus Evil: Representations of the Monstrous in Thirteenth Century Anglo-French Apocalypse Manuscripts

This paper examines one of the oldest ideological conflicts of all time: that between the divine powers of good and evil in the Book of Revelation, as represented in thirteenth century Anglo-French apocalypse manuscripts.

A Vision of Baby Jesus from 1344

The story told by Margaretha Ebner is a fascinating one – an intimate experience with the Baby Jesus. In her own words, she describes powerful visions of being with the infant, and even breastfeeding him.

Marrying Jesus: Brides and the Bridegroom in Medieval Women’s Religious Literature

Phrases such as ‘bride of Christ’ and passages which describe Christ as a ‘Bridegroom,’ a ‘Spouse,’ and a ‘Lover’ appear in a wide range of Christian texts composed in both Latin and vernacular languages.

BOOK REVIEW: Pilgrim Routes of the British Isles by Emma J. Wells

What was pilgrimage like in the Middle Ages? Do modern day routes faithfully retrace the steps of long ago pilgrims? How has pilgrimage changed over the course of hundreds of years? Tourist? Pilgrim? Or both? What is the meaning of pilgrimage today?

Hearing medieval voices

Hearing voices without external stimuli: in the popular imagination, auditory hallucination is most often understood as a symptom of severe mental disorders.

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