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Christ as Priest in Byzantine church decoration of the 11th and 12th centuries

The 11th century was a watershed in the Byzantine church decoration.

Did everyone believe in religion in medieval Europe?

One common idea about medieval Europe was that everyone were firm believers in religion. If you were a Christian, then you accepted your faith without question.

No Strings Attached: Emotional Interaction with Animated Sculptures of Crucified Christ

Such life-size Christs were not just the stuff of dreams (or nightmares), but have existed in Europe throughout the middle ages – massive wooden bodies, from the size of a small adult up to three metres tall, were habitually hung on the crosses above the nave.

Private Passions: The Contemplation of Suffering in Medieval Affective Devotions

This dissertation examines the representation of suffering in medieval affective devotional texts.

Virtual Pilgrimage through the Jerusalem Cityscape

This essay considers a group of images depicting the Passion that are, at one level, quite disparate: they are executed in different media, in vastly different sizes, and with different target audiences.

Fish on Friday I: Economic Blessing or Dietary Sacrifice?

A lack of red meat on the medieval table meant the diners were having a humble meal, and fish was a convenient substitute protein.

Book Review: A Medieval Woman’s Companion by Susan Signe Morrison

Susan Signe Morrison’s book, “A Medieval Woman’s Companion” brings the contributions of medieval women, famous and obscure, to the forefront in this fantastic introductory text.

A Garden Enclosed, A Fountain Sealed Up: Paradoxical and Generative Metaphors of Enclosure in Medieval Female Anchoritism

The anchoritic life was a particular manifestation of the secluded or eremitical life.

The 
Privileging
 of 
Visio
 over
 Vox 
in
 the 
Mystical
 Experiences
 of
 Hildegard 
of 
Bingen 
and
 Joan
 of
 Arc

Even
 though
 medieval
 women
 mystics
 have
 enjoyed
 increased
 attention
 in
 recent
 scholarly
 discussion, 
a
 topic
 that
 still
 has
 not
 been
 tackled
 is
 the
 possible
 difference
 between
 seeing
 a
 vision
 and
 hearing
 a
 voice
 during
 a
 mystical
 experience
 and
 the
 ramifications
 of
 this
 difference 
in
 the
 context 
of
 medieval
 text 
production
 and 
in
 the
 status
 of
 mystics
 as
 authors.


Good versus Evil: Representations of the Monstrous in Thirteenth Century Anglo-French Apocalypse Manuscripts

This paper examines one of the oldest ideological conflicts of all time: that between the divine powers of good and evil in the Book of Revelation, as represented in thirteenth century Anglo-French apocalypse manuscripts.

A Vision of Baby Jesus from 1344

The story told by Margaretha Ebner is a fascinating one – an intimate experience with the Baby Jesus. In her own words, she describes powerful visions of being with the infant, and even breastfeeding him.

Marrying Jesus: Brides and the Bridegroom in Medieval Women’s Religious Literature

Phrases such as ‘bride of Christ’ and passages which describe Christ as a ‘Bridegroom,’ a ‘Spouse,’ and a ‘Lover’ appear in a wide range of Christian texts composed in both Latin and vernacular languages.

BOOK REVIEW: Pilgrim Routes of the British Isles by Emma J. Wells

What was pilgrimage like in the Middle Ages? Do modern day routes faithfully retrace the steps of long ago pilgrims? How has pilgrimage changed over the course of hundreds of years? Tourist? Pilgrim? Or both? What is the meaning of pilgrimage today?

Hearing medieval voices

Hearing voices without external stimuli: in the popular imagination, auditory hallucination is most often understood as a symptom of severe mental disorders.

Embracing Death, Celebrating Life: Reflections on the Concept of Martyrdom in the Order of the Knights Templar

This article aims at shedding light on this neglected aspect of Templar spirituality and discusses the implications of this concept’s manifestation throughout the order’s history.

Women and Catharism

Participation of women in sustaining and spreading the dualist heresy known as Catharism in Languedoc in the first half of the thirteenth century was greater than the passive role generally assigned to them in medieval society

How to Deal with the Restless Dead? Discernment of Spirits and the Response to Ghosts in Fifteenth-Century Europe

Discernment of spirits was embedded in late medieval theologies and ministries of death and, as such, was central to the assessment of other apparitions – like those of ghosts.

Annihilation and Authorship: Three Women Mystics of the 1290s

Mechthild of Hackeborn, Angela of Foligno, and Marguerite Porete were exact contemporaries who differed in language, social status, and modes of religious life; their books diverge no less in genre, modes of production, and posthumous destinies.

Negotiating the Sacred: Byzantium, Venice and the True Cross in Late Medieval Venice

Dr. Klein’s lecture about art, faith and politics in late medieval Venice.

Baptism in Anglo-Saxon England

This thesis examines the lexical field of baptism in Old English. The lexical development of the field and the semantic development of the individual lexemes were evaluated: the verbs fulwian, cristnian, depan, dyppan, and the vocabulary for baptismal water in Old English. At every stage of the project, the linguistic data was correlated to theological, liturgical and cultural backgrounds.

The sin of crime: The Mutual Influence of the Early Irish and Anglo-Saxon Penitentials and Secular Laws

One of the most fascinating questions concerning Medieval Irish and Anglo-Saxon society is not one about what was done when all went well, but rather, what was sought to be done when matters were not as they ought to be.

VIDEO: Female Sufis in the Medieval Period

Dr. Lloyd Ridgeon talks about the role of Sufi women in the medieval period. Ridgeone examines positive and negative portrayals of Sufi women in a wide range of texts.

Grief and Spiritual Crisis in the Middle Ages

Existential crises and questions of faith in times of hardship are not modern phenomena. Medieval people routinely questioned their faith, most poignantly when it came to death.

The Cathedral and the City

Another fantastic talk. Professor Caroline Bruzelius talks to us about medieval art, architecture, and the role of the cathedral in Medieval society.

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