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Popular Politics and Public Opinion in Late Medieval Paris

Michael Sizer discusses the popular politics of late medieval Paris (1380-1422) and what bearing it may have on the way we understand popular political culture today.

What Happened to the Grandsons and Great-grandsons of the House of York?

The Tudors, according to Tudor propaganda, brought an end to 30 years of civil war between the Houses of York and Lancaster, merging the two families through Henry VII’s marriage to Elizabeth of York, the eldest daughter of the Yorkist King Edward IV, the son of Duke Richard.

Imperial Electioneering: The Evolution of the Election in the Holy Roman Empire from the Collapse of the Carolingians to the Rise of the Ottonians

This election set the Holy Roman Empire apart from the Carolingian Empire and the rest of Europe. This strange political development would define the Holy Roman Empire and central Europe for centuries to come.

The Medieval Roots of Democracy

By the late Middle Ages, institutions of self-government, including regional representative institutions, municipal assemblies, and numerous other autonomous units, had come to saturate West European society.

An Uneasy Relation: Byzantium and the Nomads

Byzantine sources provide abundant information about how the imperial government in Constantinople dealt with the peoples inhabiting the steppe lands north of the Black and Caspian Seas.

The Measure of a King: Forging English Royal Reputations, 1066-1272

The good, the bad, the inept, the brave and the foolish – English historiography is peppered with remarkable kings whose reputations cling to them despite the best efforts of historians. Yet what is it that makes a king?

Kingship-in-Death in the Bayeux Tapestry

The interpretation of the purpose of the Bayeux tapestry hinges on two key scenes, Harold’s oath-taking at Bayeux and the death-bed of King Edward.

How to Defeat a Tyrant: The Florentines against the Duke

In a time of crisis the Republic of Florence turned to a brash noble to lead their city. He soon turned into a disgraceful tyrant. Could the Florentine citizens overthrow him before a plot to murder hundreds of people could be carried out?

Mob Politics: The Political Influence of the Circus Factions in the Eastern Empire from the Reign of Leo I to Heraclius (457-641)

This thesis explores the political motivations behind the factions’ violent behaviour, the evidence for their involvement in the military, and their role in accession ceremonies.

The Lancastrian Retreat from Populist Discourse? Propaganda Conflicts in the Wars of the Roses

This article explores an aspect of the propaganda wars that were conducted between the Lancastrian and Yorkist sides during the series of conflicts historians refer to as the Wars of the Roses.

The sons of Eadmund Ironside, Anglo-Saxon king at the court of Saint Stephen

Eadmund Ironside died shortly after his agreement with Canute, King of Denmark, deciding the boundaries of his realm. His decease took place on 30th November 1016.

Richard I and Berengaria of Navarre

Berengaria of’ Navarre was brought to Richard’s court, then at Messina in Sicily, in March 1191. She accompanied the crusader-king on his journey east and they were married in Cyprus, at Limassol, on 12 May 1191.

Isabella of France: The Rebel Queen

Read an excerpt from the new book by Kathryn Warner

Private Force and the Making of States, c. 1100–1500

This chapter shows how the distinction between the public and the private emerges with respect to the use of force in conjunction with the long rise of the state in Europe.

The Life of Lady Katherine Gordon

This week, Susan Abernethy brings us an article on Lady Katherine Gordon.

The Global Side of Medieval at the Getty Centre: Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts

Los Angeles correspondent, Danielle Trynoski takes through the, ‘Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts’ exhibut at the Getty Museum.

The Daily Life of a Medieval King

Have you wondered just what a medieval king did on a typical day? We actually do have an account of what it was like for King Charles V of France, thanks to Christine de Pizan.

Osthryth, Queen of the Mercians

Osthryth was one of the few women mentioned by the Venerable Bede in his Ecclesiastical History of the English People. She was born into a time of great strife. There was much tension and bad blood between the ruling houses of the various kingdoms in England before unification, especially between Mercia and Northumbria.

The Historicity of Imperial Bride-Shows

Seven independent Byzantine sources record that five times in the eighth and ninth centuries the winner in a competition of beautiful women became the bride of an emperor or future emperor.

Challenge to the Throne: the Byzantine Princess Anna Komnene and Conspiracies, 1118-1119

Today, I will focus on the latter aspect, and look at two conspiracies plans in terms of her character as a princess hungry for power.

Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville: A True Romance

Read an excerpt from Amy Licence’s new book on the 15th century royal couple.

The Power of Medieval States – A Report from the Year 1423

A 15th-century Venetian report estimates on the military and economic strength of the kingdoms and states of Europe

A Tale of too Many Romes: Competing Byzantine and Medieval Claims to Roman Legacy

Likewise in the Middle Ages, Rome’s legacy was contested among many powers and interested parties. The eastern (Byzantine) and western (German) emperors insisted that each was the sole legitimate owner of the title ‘Emperor of the Romans.’

Isabeau of Bavaria, Anne of France, and the History of Female Regency in France

With Charles VI and Isabeau of Bavaria the history of female regency in France takes a turn of the greatest importance, moving towards a conception of regency as a proxy reign for the king exercised ideally by the queen mother.

The Peaceful Part of the Norman Conquest of England

What happened between the Battle of Hastings and William’s coronation on Christmas Day, 1066?

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