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Book Review: The Mortecarni

Are you a horror fan looking for something different to shake up your reading list? Kelly Evans might have just what you’re looking for in her latest novel, ‘The Mortecarni’, a medieval zombie mash up set around the time of the Black Death.

MEDIEVAL BOOKS: Black Friday!

Here are a few recent releases for medievalists hunting for Black Friday books and early Christmas gifts!

The Struggle is Real: Where are the Medieval Economists?!

Another fascinating paper from “Making the Medieval Relevant” was given by Daniel Curtis, a specialist in Social and Economic History, and a professor at the University of Utrecht.

Making the Medieval Relevant: Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies on Disease and Disability

A summary of a paper given by Professor Christina Lee at the University of Nottingham’s “Making the Medieval Relevant” Conference.

Movie Review: Dangerous Beauty

Late 16th century Venice, where a woman can be a nun, a wife or a courtesan. For Veronica Franco, the free spirited girl scorned by because of her lack of wealth, the choice is an obvious one…

Single Genetic change created the medieval plague, researchers find

Yersinia pestis, the bacteria that caused Justinian’s Plague and the Black Death, was once only able to cause a mild gastrointestinal infection. However, researchers have found that a single genetic change to bacteria turned into one of the deadliest diseases in human history.

Yersinia pestis and the Plague of Justinian 541–543 AD: a genomic analysis

Between 541 and 543 AD, the Plague of Justinian, traditionally regarded as the first of three human plague pandemics, spread from either central Asia or Africa across the Mediterranean basin into Europe, killing an estimated 100 million people according to the contemporary scholar Procopius

Papers on Medieval Prosopography: Session #47 at KZOO 2015

Three fantastic papers on Prosopography from #KZOO2015.

How Climate Change in Asia brought the Black Death to Europe

A group of Norwegian and Swiss researchers have uncovered links between climatic changes in central Asia and repeated outbreaks of the Bubonic plague in Europe, starting with the Black Death in the 14th century.

Plague Remedies from Renaissance Italy

‘Rue tops, one clove of garlic, a walnut, a grain of salt, and eat on an empty stomach everyday for up to a month, and you must be cheerful, and this recipe, it’s good against vermin and it’s perfect.

INTERVIEW: A Conversation with SD Sykes about Plague Land

My interview with fiction author, SD Sykes about her fantastic medieval crime novel, Plague Land.

Containing Contagion: Perception and Prevention of Plague in the Late Middle Ages

When the Black Death, one of the world’s deadliest epidemics, struck the European continent, the people afflicted with plague looked to those already respected in the medical field.

Living la vita apostolica: Life expectancy and mortality of nuns in late-medieval Holland

Living la vita apostolica: Life expectancy and mortality of nuns in late-medieval Holland Jaco Zuijderduijn (Utrecht University ) Centre for Global Economic History: Utrecht University, Working Paper No. 44, June (2013) Abstract Data on vital events of medieval women are extremely scarce. We use a dataset based on a necrology of nuns in late-medieval Holland […]

MOVIE REVIEW: Flesh and Blood

My review of the late medieval movie, Flesh and Blood.

Mordred: Treachery, Transference, and Border Pressure in British Arthurian Romance

This study focuses on the question of how Mordred comes to be portrayed as a traitor within the British Arthurian context.

Black Death and Justinian’s Plague were caused by the same pathogen, scientists find

Two of the world’s deadliest pandemics – Justinian’s Plague and the Black Death – were caused by the same pathogen. These findings were revealed yesterday in an article published in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Stature and frailty during the Black Death: the effect of stature on risks of epidemic mortality in London, A.D. 1348-1350

Recent research has shown that pre-existing health condition affected an individual ’ s risk of dying duringthe 14th-century Black Death. However, a previous study of the effect of adult stature on risk of mortality during the epidemic failed to find a relationship between the two; this result is perhaps surprising given the well-documented inverse association between stature and mortality in human populations.

Islamic Attitudes to Disasters in the Middle Ages: A Comparison of Earthquakes and Plagues

By comparing two natural disasters, earthquakes and epidemics, in particular the plague, this article tries to reconstruct general features of debates around disasters in medieval Islam.

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