Advertisement

Priest as Criminal: Community Regulation of Priests in the Archdeaconry of Paris, 1483-1505

This dissertation examines accusations of criminal behavior levied against priests in the archdeaconry of Paris from 1483 – 1505.

Medieval Mass Grave discovered in Paris

Archaeologists in the French capital have discovered more than 200 skeletons on what was once the site of a medieval hospital. It is believed that the remains date between the 14th and 16th centuries.

How a 13th-century royal chapel influenced the history of France

UCLA art historian Meredith Cohen and her fascination with the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris

10 Creepy Things to See at the Louvre That Are Better Than the Mona Lisa

If you’re an ancient historian, a medievalist, or early modernist, there are so many other amazing pieces and works of art a the Louvre other than these two tourist staples. Here is my list of cool, creepy, unusual and better than the Mona Lisa at the Louvre in Paris.

10 Cool Medieval Things to See at the Musée de Cluny

I just visited Muée de Cluny this week while in Paris and picked out a few fabulous items you might want to check out on your next visit to this amazing medieval museum!

The Louvre: Highlights for Medievalists

Despite offering exemplary samples of almost every type of art, the Louvre showcases some great examples of medieval art. The Richelieu Wing is where it’s at!

Change in Northern Winds: A Modern Review of the Viking Siege of Paris 845

Paris has been besieged many times throughout history, yet the Siege of Paris by the Vikings in 845 remains a significant episode in this larger chronology.

Places to See: Sainte Chapelle

Travelling to Paris ? Add this beautiful thirteenth century Capetian chapel to your MUST-SEE list for your next visit!

Petrus Hispanus (circa 1215-1277) and ‘The Treasury of the Poor’

The identity of Petrus Hispanus is a matter of some controversy. Part of the problem is centred on the fact that ‘Hispanus’ covers the general region of the Iberian Peninsula, referred to in medieval times as ‘las Españas’ (the Spains), incorporating both present day Spain and Portgual.

10 Medieval and Renaissance Things to See at the Victoria and Albert Museum

My latest visit to the Victoria and Albert Musuem: 10 Medieval and Renaissance Things to See at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

The Lit de Justice: Semantics, Ceremonial, and the Parlement of Paris, 1300–1600

The curious phrase lit de justice originated in the fourteenth century and by the first decade of the fifteenth century designated particularly important royal sessions of the Parlement of Paris.

Caught in Love’s Grip: Passion and Moral Agency in French Courtly Romance

French royal courts in the late twelfth century were absolutely smitten with love. Troubadaours traveled from place to place reciting stories of knights and the ladies they wooed.

Women, Heresy, and Crusade: Toward a Context for Jacques de Vitry’s Relationship to the Early Beguines

Grundmann‘s search for a founding figure is understandable in light of the problematic nature of Beguine institutional history. Beguine historiography has long struggled with the anomalous lack of clear foundation documents and accounts.

Charles the Fat and the Viking Great Army: The Military Explanation for the End of the Carolingian Empire

In late July 885 a large Viking fleet gathered at the mouth of the River Seine and began to move upstream in the direction of Paris.

Manuel II Palaeologus in Paris (1400-1402): Theology, Diplomacy, and Politics

The end of the fourteenth century found the Byzantine Empire in a critical state.

Between Official and Private Dispute: The Case of Christian Spain and Provence in the Late Middle Ages

Literary and historical evidence of religious disputes that took place between Jews and Christians during the Middle Ages exists in a varietyof sources.

The Place of Germany in the Twelfth-Century Renaissance: Books, Scriptoria and Libraries

Scholars in Germany and elsewhere have studied individual instances of this growth in the output of scriptoria and expansion of collections, but no-one, as far as I know, has drawn attention to the impressive scale and character of the phenomenon as a whole.

The Queen of Sicily’s Paris Shopping List, 1277

Sarah-Grace Heller examines a letter sent by Charles I of Anjou, King of Sicily to one of his agents in Paris, where he provides a detailed order of textiles and clothing that he needed to have purchased.

Tax administration and compliance: evidence from medieval Paris

We provide evidence from the Parisian tailles levied between 1292 and 1313 and other historical records that indicates that these royal taxes were collected from the Free City of Paris at a remarkably low cost, without violence and with limited recourse to legal action against tax evaders.

medievalverse magazine