Advertisement

Poetic Wisdom from the Ninth-Century

Across the medieval world we can find various writings aimed at giving advice and wisdom. Here is some poetic wisdom from the ninth-century Middle East.

The Cadaver Synod: Low Point in the History of the Papacy

The notorious Cadaver Synod, when one Pope put on trial the corpse of one of his predecessors. Perhaps the lowest point in the history of the Papacy, the story of this trial is as murky as it is strange.

The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, Issue 8) : Mother’s Day Issue

In our latest issue: Celebrating Mother’s Day. Mothers Who Weren’t: Wet Nurses in the Late Medieval Mediterranean
Motherly advice from the ninth century, Sex in the Roman Empire: In Bed with the Romans! Feast, Famine, and Food in Medieval Russia, Books: A trip through Welsh past in Mysterious Wales and much, much more!

Traditio vel Aemulatio? The Singing Contest of Samarra, Expression of a Medieval Culture of Competition

The rivalry between two famous female singers was the topic of the day in al-Mutawakkil’s (r. 847–61) Samarra, according to the Kitab al-aghani.

Rodulf and Ubba: In Search of a Frisian–Danish Viking

This article attempts to reconstruct some of Rodulf’s life and deeds.

Visions in a Ninth-Century Village: an Early Medieval Microhistory

This article however suggests that an account of a ninth-century peasant’s vision can be read to recover a microhistory of a rural priest in northern Francia, and draws out the implications for how the local societies of the period might be viewed.

A Journey to the Far North in the Ninth Century

The name Ohthere does not usually rank among the great explorers of the Middle Ages, such as Leif Eriksson, Marco Polo and Christopher Columbus. However, his exploits are very impressive, for he would sail into Arctic Circle over eleven hundred years ago.

The Global Side of Medieval at the Getty Centre: Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts

Los Angeles correspondent, Danielle Trynoski takes through the, ‘Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts’ exhibut at the Getty Museum.

Movie Review: Pope Joan – Medieval Legend Comes to Life Onscreen

Released in 2009, also under its German title, ,Die Päpstin,, ,Pope Joan’ recounts the medieval legend of Johanna von Ingleheim, a woman who disguised herself as a man, lived as a monk, and eventually went on to become pope in the ninth century.

Outrage in Matrera Over Botched Castle Restoration

A botched restoration attempt in Spain has garnered international attention and condemnation from locals, historians and conservationists.

A Viking Mess – Northmen: A Viking Saga Movie Review

This week’s medieval movie is Northmen: A Viking Saga.

The First Book Reviewer

A book reviewer from the 9th century – unsurprisingly, he hated a lot of what her read.

Surviving Winter in the Middle Ages

Surviving Winter in the Middle Ages: How did people stay warm? What did they eat? What did they do?

The Empire that was always Decaying: The Carolingians (800-888)

According to most textbooks, the first Western empire to succeed its late Roman predecessor suddenly burst upon the scene, on Christmas Day 800 in Rome, when Pope Leo III turned Charles, King of the Franks and Lombards, and patricius (protector) of the Romans, into an imperator augustus

The first case of pagophagia: the Byzantine Emperor Theophilus

This paper describes a unique case of snow consumption by the Byzantine Emperor Theophilus (829-842 AD), who according to the narrations of the historians and chroniclers of those times was an ice eater, developing a pathologic craving for iced water and snow.

The Evil Spirit that Terrorized a Medieval Village

Today’s horror movies could make use of this story from the ninth-century, of how an evil spirit terrorized a village, and the attempt to get rid of it, which seems to be one of the earliest recorded exorcisms from the Middle Ages.

Against the Currents of His Day: Brittany, Louis the Pious, and Elite Insurrection

During Louis the Pious’s 36-year reign, he spent much of his time convening assemblies, securing his borders, and trying to govern his empire, rather than conquering and expanding aggressively as his father and grandfather, Charlemagne and Pepin, had done.

Is it better to be right or left-handed? The view from the 9th century

Was it really bad to be left-handed in the Middle Ages? Or was it better than being right-handed? The 9th century writer of all things unusual, al-Jahiz, weighs in.

Magna Carta Conference Offers New Insights Into The 800-year-old Document

Magna Carta just celebrated its 800th birthday this past Monday. In honour of this incredible milestone, King’s College London, and the Magna Carta Project, hosted a 3 day conference dedicated to this historic document.

How Well Do You Know the Ninth Century?

From Alfred the Great to a Giant Buddha – try our quiz about the 9th century.

The Vikings on the Continent in Myth and History

This article examines the evidence for the Vikings’ supposed cruelty, cunning and remarkable height and investigates how true the stereotypes were.

Irish and Scots may have been first to settle Iceland, researcher finds

It has long been believed that the first people to inhabit Iceland were the Norse settlers who arrived around the year 874 AD. However, the discovery of Christian crosses carved into man-made caves in the southern part of the island is offering evidence that Celtic-speaking people from Scotland and Ireland had come to Iceland around the beginning the ninth century.

Comparing China and India in the 9th century

A ninth-century Arabic text offers insights into daily life in medieval China and India.

Trolls in the Middle Ages

Where did trolls come from? What did medieval and early modern people think of trolls? How did the concept of the modern day troll evolve?

Change in Northern Winds: A Modern Review of the Viking Siege of Paris 845

Paris has been besieged many times throughout history, yet the Siege of Paris by the Vikings in 845 remains a significant episode in this larger chronology.

medievalverse magazine