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The 
Privileging
 of 
Visio
 over
 Vox 
in
 the 
Mystical
 Experiences
 of
 Hildegard 
of 
Bingen 
and
 Joan
 of
 Arc

Even
 though
 medieval
 women
 mystics
 have
 enjoyed
 increased
 attention
 in
 recent
 scholarly
 discussion, 
a
 topic
 that
 still
 has
 not
 been
 tackled
 is
 the
 possible
 difference
 between
 seeing
 a
 vision
 and
 hearing
 a
 voice
 during
 a
 mystical
 experience
 and
 the
 ramifications
 of
 this
 difference 
in
 the
 context 
of
 medieval
 text 
production
 and 
in
 the
 status
 of
 mystics
 as
 authors.


A Vision of Baby Jesus from 1344

The story told by Margaretha Ebner is a fascinating one – an intimate experience with the Baby Jesus. In her own words, she describes powerful visions of being with the infant, and even breastfeeding him.

Annihilation and Authorship: Three Women Mystics of the 1290s

Mechthild of Hackeborn, Angela of Foligno, and Marguerite Porete were exact contemporaries who differed in language, social status, and modes of religious life; their books diverge no less in genre, modes of production, and posthumous destinies.

Julian of Norwich: Mystic, Theologian and Anchoress

Very little is known of her actual life, not even her real name. We do know she wrote two texts in English on her visions and their meaning

Feminine Love in the Twelfth Century – A Case Study: The Mulier in the Lost Love Letters and the Work of Female Mystics

This article compares the twelfth-century writings of the secular mulier in the Lost Love Letters with the work of religious female ‘mystics’ to draw comparisons about the way these authors chose to express love.

The influence of conflicting medieval church and social discourses on individual consciousness : dissociation in the visions of Hadewijch of Brabant

This article examines the influence of the conflicting dis- courses in the medieval church and its social context on the subconscious experiences of Hadewijch of Brabant, a 13th century Flemish visionary, mystical author, vernacular theologian and Beguine leader

INTERVIEW: A Conversation with SD Sykes about Plague Land

My interview with fiction author, SD Sykes about her fantastic medieval crime novel, Plague Land.

An outside for the inside : a psychoanalytic reading of The Book of Margery Kempe

It is evident in Margery Kempe’s visions of holy family life that Virgin and Christ dyad is an oedipal fantasy of the child who is the father of himself.

Medieval mystic Angela da Foligno is named a Saint

Pope Francis made the surprising announcement last week that Angela da Foligno, an Italian Franciscan and mystic, has been named a saint.

Vision and Revision: The Female Mystics as Writers in Late Medieval Northern Europe

When I first encountered the writings of the medieval mystics years ago, I began this study with a simple question: why has so much writing been produced about a topic considered to be ineffable, inexpressible?

The Privileging of Visio over Vox in the Mystical Experiences of Hildegard of Bingen and Joan of Arc

Even
 though
 medieval
 women
 mystics
 have
 enjoyed
 increased
 attention
 in
 recent
 scholarly
 discussion,
 a
 topic
 that
 still
 has
 not
 been
 tackled
 is
 the
 possible
 difference
 between
 seeing
 a
 vision
 and
 hearing
 a
 voice
 during
 a
 mystical
 experience


Sisters Between: Gender and the Medieval Beguines

The origins of the Beguines can be traced to two important medieval religious reform movements: monastic mysticism and the vita apostolica, or “apostolic life.”

The Representation of Antichrist in Hildegard of Bingen’s Scivias

The image thatis the subjectof this essay is one of thirty-five miniatures that once illuminated the lost Rupertsberg manuscript (Wiesbaden, Hessisches Landesbibl., MS 1, ca. 1165-75), a deluxe copy of Scivias.

Transitional Holiness in the Twelfth Century: The Social and Spiritual Identity of Domina Christina of Markyate

Visions flourish within particular domestic contexts and disciplines, and Christina enables us to glimpse a sub-culture of visionary experience in twelfth-century England, which rarely shows up in sources and is given little authority in the dominant narratives.

Abandoned to Love: The Proceso of María de Cazalla and the Mirror of Simple Souls

In comparing the trial of María de Cazalla with Marguerite Porete’s Mirror of Simple Souls, one of the most notable works of medieval mysticism, the present study aims to demonstrate how the main components of alumbradismo may be discerned in a single normative example of medieval mystical theology.

Late-Medieval Women: Ascetic Performance and Subversive Mysticism

Christina the Astonishing (1150-1224), Mary of Oignies (1177-1213), and Margaret of Ypres (1216-1237) are examples of such lay women who used the accepted role of Female Mystic to effect and secure alternative lifestyles, and also to gain authority that equalled, and often surpassed, the male voices that made up their communities.

Devotion to the Name of Jesus in Medieval England

Denis Renevey discusses the medieval mystic tradition from the 11th century to the Reformation, the significance of the name of Jesus during this period, and its impact on religious attitudes in the Middle Ages.

Teaching the Visions: Female Mystics’ Participation in Thirteenth-Century Education

Female visionaries in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries brought to their readers vivid accounts of spiritual meetings with God regarding the religious life.

Christian Mysticism as a Threat to Papal Traditions

Several aspects of the mystic Christianity in the Middle Ages challenged the traditions of the church, including the mystics’ theological interpretation of scripture, their graphic visions, and their threat to established gender roles.

Cryptozoology in the Medieval and Modern Worlds

Albertus Magnus’s thirteenth-century work, De animalibus, a lengthy compilation based on Aristotle and on a handful of commentators, is as close as the Middle Ages comes to a systematic natural history in our understanding of the term.

An introduction to the investigation into the mental health of female medieval mystics

While the Medieval ascription to madness is known, in the light of recent psychological and medical insights, I will explore alternative explanations for the extreme behaviour of devout women in the Middle Ages.

The female body, animal imagery, and authoritarian discourse in the Ancrene Riwle

Through close reading and rhetorical analysis of numerous passages in the guide, this dissertation re-examines the importance of the body and authority in this work and notes the points at which the discourse of the Ancrene Riwle tends to place restrictions on its audience of medieval women religious.

VAGANTES: Necessary Imperfection: The Body of Sainte Marie l’Egyptienne

This paper seeks to examine the role of the body and its relationship to the world around it in the “vie de sainte” of Marie l’Egyptienne, who is an excellent example of a female saint who begins life as a sinner and transforms her body into something holy. This presentation will focus on the version of Marie l’Egyptienne’s life written by Rutebeuf in the 13th century, but will also bring in elements of other versions and of the stories of other female saints who transform their bodies for comparison.

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