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Major Michelangelo exhibition to begin next week at The Met

Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from November 13, 2017, through February 12, 2018, will present a stunning range and number of works by the artist.

The Hidden Symbols of Fertility in Michelangelo’s Medici Chapel

Michelangelo often surreptitiously inserted pagan symbols into his works of art, many of them possibly associated with anatomical representations. A new analysis suggests that Michelangelo may have concealed symbols associated with female anatomy within his famous work in the Medici Chapel.Michelangelo often surreptitiously inserted pagan symbols into his works of art, many of them possibly associated with anatomical representations. A new analysis suggests that Michelangelo may have concealed symbols associated with female anatomy within his famous work in the Medici Chapel.

Laser scanning and 3D Printing used to recreate Michelangelo’s bronzes

A team of researchers have been working together to try to understand how the two mysterious Renaissance bronzes were made and why they look the way they do by making accurate replicas of the originals.

The drawings that Michelangelo did not want you to see

There are about 600 drawings by the Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo that have survived to the present day – many of them stunningly beautiful – but he would probably have been ‘absolutely horrified’ that the general public can now see them.

Michelangelo, Copernicus and the Sistine Chapel

A detailed examination of the themes, motifs and secrets held with Michelagelo’s masterpiece.

The Council of Trent (1545–63) and Michelangelo’s Last Judgment (1541)

Michelangelo’s Last Judgment is one of the world’s most famous paintings, located in one of the world’s most famous rooms, the Sistine Chapel.

Does Michelangelo’s poetic veil shroud a secret Luther?

The thesis poses a question derived from an unlikely nexus of two prominent figures of the Renaissance and the Reformation: the artist whose creative abilities ostensibly dominate the Vatican and religious art, juxtaposed with the rebel who splintered the dominance of Roman Catholicism.

Sofonisba Anguissola: Marvel of Nature

Sofonisba Anguissola: Marvel of Nature Fulmer, Betsy Academic Forum, No.23 (2005-6) Abstract Born in Italy during the Renaissance, Sofonisba Anguissola was the first internationally recognized female artist. This paper examines the events that advanced her career and the cultural situation in which she found herself competing as an artist. Uniquely, during the Italian Renaissance arose […]

‘… con uno inbasamento et ornamento alto’: The Rhetoric of the Pedestal c.1430 – 1550

‘… con uno inbasamento et ornamento alto’: The Rhetoric of the Pedestal c.1430 – 1550 By Alison Wright Art History, Volume 34, Issue 1 (2011) Introduction:  When, in 1504, the Florentine painter Cosimo Rosselli gave his opinion on the best situation for Michelangelo’s colossal David, he suggested it be placed by the cathedral and raised […]

Michelangelo’s Moses of the Julius Tomb: The Definitive Michelangelo Sculpture

Michelangelo’s Moses of the Julius Tomb is one of the most powerful works from one of the most important artists of all time. Michelangelo is perhaps best known for the David.

Metaphorical painting: Michelangelo, Dante, and the Last Judgment

Metaphorical painting: Michelangelo, Dante, and the Last Judgment Barnes, Bernadine The Art Bulletin; Mar (1995)77, 1 Abstract In the lower right corner of the Last Judgement, Michelangelo painted an unmistakeable quotation from Dante’s Inferno (figs. 1, 2). The figures of Charon and Minos were easily recognized by sixteenth-century viewers, and to the present day no […]

History, origins, recovery: Michelangelo and the politics of art

When Michelangelo returned to Florence from Rome in the early spring of 1501, he returned to a city that had not yet recovered from a profound artistic crisis.

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