Advertisement

Horses for work and horses for war: the divergent horse market in late medieval England

Rivaled perhaps only by the medieval knight, horses evoke some of the most familiar images associated with England in the Middle Ages.

An Assessment of the ‘Sweating Sickness’ Affecting England During the Tudor Dynasty

This strange disease, known variously as “sweating sickness,” Sudor anglicus, or simply the “Sweat” occurred almost exclusively in England and only during the first half of the Tudor dynasty, seemingly vanishing in 1551.

Decline or Transformation? Archaeology and the Late Medieval ‘Urban Decline’ in Southern England

Decline or Transformation? Archaeology and the Late Medieval ‘Urban Decline’ in Southern England By Ben Jervis Archaeological Journal, Vol.174:1 (2017) Abstract: Archaeological evidence is used to examine how urban life changed in the later medieval towns of Sussex, Surrey, and Hampshire in southern England, in light of ongoing debates about the existence of a fifteenth-century urban […]

Heads, shoulders, knees and toes: Injury and death in Anglo-Scottish combat, c.1296-c.1403

For all that has been written about this period, little, however, has been produced regarding the realities of war, the impact that it had on the individual soldier, or the wounds suffered by those who engaged in these conflicts.

The Medieval History of Stonehenge

How was Stonehenge perceived in the Middle Ages? Was it simply abandoned to the passage of time?

Viking ‘Thing’ discovered in Sherwood Forest

A Viking Assembly site or ‘Thing’ has been discovered in the heart of England’s Sherwood Forest.

The career of Roger Mortimer, first earl of March (c.1287-1330)

A straightforward analysis of his regime is accompanied by a demonstration that, even though the court dictated political life, Roger Mortimer was able to extend his influence across the British Isles and pose a serious threat to the kingship of Edward III.

Ruined medieval castle for sale in England

The beautiful ruins of a 14th century castle in northern England have gone up for sale.

10 Medieval Royal Parents Whose Decisions Influence the Lives of Royal Children Today

From royal baby names to marrying for love – how five medieval English couples influence the lives of royal children today.

Clothes Make the (Wo)Man: Interpreting Evidence of the Secondhand Clothing Trade in Late Medieval England

There is very little work done on the topic of secondhand clothing in the Middle Ages, but what has been done has revealed a new phenomenon that reshaped the social structure of medieval England.

The Prior, the Prioress, and the Kidnappers

Monks were deserting their pastoral posts and in some cases their vows altogether; nuns were having covert affairs with local men and—worse—getting caught.

Eleanor of Aquitaine: A Queen and A Mother

The mere mention of Eleanor of Aquitaine brings to mind an remarkable woman in many respects.

Common Rights and Natural Resources: The 1217 Charter of the Forest in Historical Perspective

It is the 800th anniversary of the Charter of the Forest in 1217.

Letters from the Otherworld: Arthur and Henry II in Stephen of Rouen’s Draco Normannicus

The poem Draco Normannicus includes a correspondence between King Arthur, now ruler of the Antipodes, and Henry II.

Medieval priest buried 700 years ago may have been a victim of the Great Famine, archaeologists report

The remains of Richard de W’Peton, a medieval priest who died 700 years ago – on 17 April 1317 – have been uncovered in an elaborate grave.

Kingmakers: How Power in England Was Won and Lost on the Welsh Frontier

Timothy Venning explores their mentality and reveals the dramatic careers both of those who prospered from their loyalty to the king and those whose power was gained by treachery – from the Norman Conquest to the beginnings of the Tudor dynasty.

The Role Of Ritual And Ceremonial In The Reign Of Edward I

The following paper will explore occasions of ceremony and ritual linked to King Edward I as an arbiter of royal power, as well as consider the means by which he utilized the influence of his position and the majesty of the monarchy to affirm and reinforce his extensive authority.

What Happened to the Grandsons and Great-grandsons of the House of York?

The Tudors, according to Tudor propaganda, brought an end to 30 years of civil war between the Houses of York and Lancaster, merging the two families through Henry VII’s marriage to Elizabeth of York, the eldest daughter of the Yorkist King Edward IV, the son of Duke Richard.

A Revolutionary Reform: How William the Conqueror Conquered the Church

The aspect of William’s rule that this work is primarily focused on is his effect on the church. The changes to the church in England can only be described as revolutionary.

The Fortunes of a King: Images of Edward the Confessor in 12th to 14th Century England

This thesis is an iconographic study of Saint-King Edward the Confessor. It focuses on the political and devotional functions of his images in twelfth to fourteenth century England.

The Lancastrian Retreat from Populist Discourse? Propaganda Conflicts in the Wars of the Roses

This article explores an aspect of the propaganda wars that were conducted between the Lancastrian and Yorkist sides during the series of conflicts historians refer to as the Wars of the Roses.

BOOK REVIEW: Medieval Medicine: Its Mysteries and Science by Toni Mount

Our review of Toni Mount’s fascinating look at medicine in the Middle Ages in – Medieval Medicine: Its Mysteries and Science by Toni Mount.

The Funeral of Queen Elizabeth of York, the First Tudor Queen of England

Elizabeth of York, Queen to King Henry VII of England, died in the Tower of London on February 11, 1503. She had given birth to a daughter Katherine on February 2 and never recovered. The death was a shock to her husband, her children and to the nation.

medievalverse magazine